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Eastland Honey

Manuka Placement Contract

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I read through a Comvita joint venture proposal the other day, and what struck me was the running costs for their beekeeping operations. The amount that they have to spend to get a Kg of honey is huge. They could just about buy it off me for cheaper, without the risk.

I also noticed that they want to have 6000 hives on the east coast, up from 2000 this year, which was a bit scary.

Hey Merk who are the joint ventures between? Is it farmers or Maori blocks and are they wanting to plant manuka or are they just harvesting the honey?

The stream of new people getting into honey around here is crazy

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Getting a good harvest of good quality Manuka is harder than most people think.

 

especially when there's a gazillion hives within flight range that weren't there a few years ago. I get the feeling that good crops are fast becoming a thing of the past.

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yea we got some interesting couple years ahead. I had 100 hives last year do nothing got zero honey but still carted them, payed wages/fuel/etc.. does the land owner pay me a percentage of my loss?

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I have had several farmers (customers of my winter job sheep scanning) tell me their beekeeper is now paying them,no manuka to be seen.

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Hey Merk who are the joint ventures between? Is it farmers or Maori blocks and are they wanting to plant manuka or are they just harvesting the honey?

The stream of new people getting into honey around here is crazy

The jv proposal that I read involved a Maori incorporation but it was a standard jv offer- aimed at big landowners. Planting Manuka is part of it but basically it reads like it's more about running some beehives in partnership.

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I have had several farmers (customers of my winter job sheep scanning) tell me their beekeeper is now paying them,no manuka to be seen.

Any idea what kind of money, and for what Rob? And what sort of beekeepers ie nuubs or what?

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didn't ask about money ,didn't want to reinforce it . was payment for having a site on the farms.

pasture sites and pasture bush ,no manuka.

In another area farmers were paid for there farms to be used as helicopter pads to get to Doc land ,no scrub what to speak of on their farms.

Well established beekeepers trying to fend off all the interlopers.

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The Farmer papers have had a bit about bees and Manuka over the winter, so most of my lunch times over the last few months have been disscusions about bees and trying to steer clear of the money aspects(quite hard)

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Stop winging abut landowners chargng for beehives.Our great D.O.C tried to charge me$10.00/hive.I was the 1st peson to apply for a licence with the department on the coast.Th only people paying that at that time were the people on Rangitoto island.When you have a seson with 0 how doyou pay the dept and,we own them.

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I don't pay for clover/bush/wintering sites. But if a farmer approached me with really really good sites, with good autumn/winter/spring forage, good access, good security and no crowding plus protection from stock etc, would I pay for it?

 

In today's market conditions, I think I would.

 

Don't get me wrong, I enjoy the current symbiotic relationship that I have with the farmers. But if it was a "designer bee farm" along the lines of what the trees for bees project envisages, it would make my life so much easier, reduce my costs and improve my summer production. It would be worth paying for.

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Good points, merk we have the same situation with forestry blocks around here (autumn/winter/spring) and while at first its a shock to pay reality is its controlled and safe.

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just regarding farmers and the safety in employment act 1992 a beekeeper is classed as an employee as the farmer receives a benefit same as he does from his own employees.

there are two types of work related hazards and those "out of the ordinary" need to be verbally mentioned to the beekeeper in this case.such things as tree felling,blasting, machinery operation ,pest control and probably hunters! anything you would not expect in a normal day,steep tracks ,narrow and slippery tracks bluffs,rivers ect do not need to carry a warning.

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just regarding farmers and the safety in employment act 1992 a beekeeper is classed as an employee as the farmer receives a benefit same as he does from his own employees.

there are two types of work related hazards and those "out of the ordinary" need to be verbally mentioned to the beekeeper in this case.such things as tree felling,blasting, machinery operation ,pest control and probably hunters! anything you would not expect in a normal day,steep tracks ,narrow and slippery tracks bluffs,rivers ect do not need to carry a warning.

 

And bridges that fall down ?

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yip a rotten bridge or even an uncertified one would be an out of ordinary hazard but a certified compliant one would be a natural hazard by its nature.

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I don't pay for clover/bush/wintering sites. But if a farmer approached me with really really good sites, with good autumn/winter/spring forage, good access, good security and no crowding plus protection from stock etc, would I pay for it?

 

In today's market conditions, I think I would.

 

Don't get me wrong, I enjoy the current symbiotic relationship that I have with the farmers. But if it was a "designer bee farm" along the lines of what the trees for bees project envisages, it would make my life so much easier, reduce my costs and improve my summer production. It would be worth paying for.

Hi Merk

Say a ten thousand Hectare, roaded, gated bee farm with no competing hives possible.

Manuka, Kanuka, Rivers, scrub and bush at 40m above sea level, north Island

 

How much would you pay fro that?

Say 1200 hives

How much would you consider that to be worth in terms of gross % of income?

 

Lets face it, No land owner on the planet is going to allow 1200 hives on a bare block like this for nothing are they.

The hives are of no benefit to the land owner at all other than as a business proposition.

 

 

Serious question about a serious block.

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