Jump to content
Alastair

Thermowood boxes

Recommended Posts

Just wondered if guys who use them paint inside the joints before assembly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How old are the oldest thermowood boxes Fieldbee & how are they holding out?

 

BTW that was great having breakfast the other day really enjoyed the catch up! :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are a little more brittle than other treatments. But we like them. We think they are warmer as brood boxes that the process makes the wood denser. We splintered the corners a little more at first when we first got them, but you learn how to handle them. Followed up on your advice and have queens organized for spring, thanks a heap and yes it was good to catch up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We bought 300 3/4 thermowood boxes about 5 yrs ago. They are used exclusively as honey boxes so spend most of the year in the shed.

 

I had 3 smash when a stack blew over just after they were painted, 1 smash went it got tangled up in a cover and pulled out of my hands as I was putting on wets one day, 1 has completely rotted out (along top edge not corner), and about 5 broke during assembly (The thermowood treatment process has been modified since and the new ones are more robust). The rest have paid for themselves some time ago.

 

Overall a higher attrition than tan E boxes for us and these days I prefer to stick to tan E boxes. This is just my experience, lots of people seam to love them.

 

ps we don't paint the corners just the out side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks that's good info. They certainly have to be handled with care.

 

My oldest are 3 years old with no rot problems yet, it will be quite a few years before I know if they do better than untreated boxes. I have been painting inside the joints not sure if that's needed.

 

Planning to buy quite a few boxes in the next month or two so just trying to figure if the extra expense & extra care needed are actually worth it in terms of a longer lived box.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the boxs are for selling on as complete hives I know all the guys here that supply hives with bees etc buy the cheapest boxs available. If they are for your own use or maybe even for hobbyists ( if you are a big softy) then obviously you probably want better quality.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They are a little more brittle than other treatments. But we like them. We think they are warmer as brood boxes that the process makes the wood denser. We splintered the corners a little more at first when we first got them, but you learn how to handle them. Followed up on your advice and have queens organized for spring, thanks a heap and yes it was good to catch up.

Sorry Alistair the oldest will be coming up 5 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

" Overall a higher attrition than tan E boxes " .............. which are ?

 

making my own now about $5 for a 3/4 $7 for a F/D

I have two home made organic wood preservatives to test

 

 

wanted to make my own frames, .... just can't beat ecroyds price

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last year we started to write the date on the inside of box when we made them ,I wish I had done ten year ago it gives a good idea how long they last or which one rott out first

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good idea.

 

I used standard untreated boxes until about 4 years ago when I switched to thermowood. The untreated boxes were white and when I switched to thermowood I used colours so I could tell. Pretty much all the untreated boxes are now showing some rot and won't be long till there are none left.

 

I'm hoping thermowood is going to save me a heap of money, although I found one recently with a corner starting to soften. I just bought 3 pallets of E tan & am painting them a different bunch of colours so will see how that goes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like @Alastair we use colour I have written the year I used on the colour chart, and it gives rough enough idea of box age. Our oldest thermowood coming up for three years now. Still looking good.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have used them since 3 years nailed and glued them together, now they start to open up on the edges and need to be re done. It looks like the glue has not worked that well. I have not painted them at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think not painting them is a mistake. The whole idea is the heating process destroys sugars etc that can aid organisms that cause rot. But the timber is very absorbent and if not painted could get splashed with all sorts of stuff that will degrade the timber.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Sweden they use thermo wood for decking and they dont pait it and it last one of the advantages should be that you would not need to paint it. The glue I was using is Holdfast Gorilla premium glue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have standard untreated boxs that were parafin dipped 10 odd years ago, we use them only for honey boxs, they i reckon could last another 10, they only outside for 6 months tops. I bought 50 box fronts this year to repair broken boxs. We dismantle the broken ones rebuild them and sand undercoat and repaint, the broken bits run the fire for our wax melter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In Sweden they use thermo wood for decking and they dont pait it and it last one of the advantages should be that you would not need to paint it. The glue I was using is Holdfast Gorilla premium glue.

New Zealand grown Radiata Pine has growth rings you can drive a bus between. The Softwoods from Europe have a much slower rate of growth and this creates tight growth rings and a very dense timber, that goes a long way to giving it the longevity you mention @Manfred. For best protectin the Thermowood boxes will still need painting. The drying process is as @Alastair mentioned to convert the sugars and starches so decay fungi cannot feed off it. A chem free fungicide treatment that in turn hardens the timber.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, would painting or dipping be the best extra treatment on these....just wondering if you were going to do only 1 of these which would be best (I currently use pine dipped and paintedx2 coats but am looking at other options).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I go in future for EPS,they are used for almost 30 years and still some in use.

Easy to maintain no rotting light in weight still after 20 years they maintain the shape.

I like the ones in the Video.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what is EPS, Manfred?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So, would painting or dipping be the best extra treatment on these....just wondering if you were going to do only 1 of these which would be best (I currently use pine dipped and paintedx2 coats but am looking at other options).

AFAIK thermowood is recommended to be painted and not recommended to be Paraffin dipped.(y)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...