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frazzledfozzle

Manuka standards

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I also sell my own honey,but by the time you have creamed it and put it in the jar I double my money especially Mnuk and Rata.If you dont you are working for nothing.Hourly rate is below the minumion wage.Customers often ask me why manuka is more expensive.I tell them that if I could not command a decent price I wouls leaveit on the hive for feed as they didin the 50s

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Re. @@Love Honey 's writing "I would like to know more about the Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective on Manuka Honey. Its a major market, and use as a tonic is a major driver."

 

There are some insights in this link from today's Herald: Asian enthusiasm for natural health boosts NZ industry - Business - NZ Herald News

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I look at it as a treat and as I hate wine what better alternative to delight the palate than some beautiful honeys produced in gods own :)

 

A bit off topic from the original thread, but here's one we don't hear much of: Mahoe Honey Mahoe - The Bees' Choice

 

Anyone got any thoughts and insights?

I've spoken to someone who thinks "most Mahoe honey is blendy. It flowers in spring, is common in regenerating forest I think, particularly in northern and central North Island, area where kamahi & rewarewa present." and bees like it as a pollen source.

 

Don't think there is much volume available...

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We have a limited run of Mahoe, from Te Urawera.

 

Its a good honey, but was not a popular vintage. We sold 500 G for 14.95.

 

People kept buying the manuka...

 

Later on, I will post the story that outlines of why that jar of Manuka is on Trademe at 44.95.

 

Explaining its Origin, vintage and the reasons for it to be like that.

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We have a limited run of Mahoe, from Te Urawera.

 

Its a good honey, but was not a popular vintage. We sold 500 G for 14.95.

 

Tks. How were the organoleptic properties?

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Tks. How were the organoleptic properties?

 

Smooth, silky, minor notes of licorice and an intense cloverlike sweetness with a hint of vanilla.

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If the market and demand isnt there for medical then it must be the table grade everyone is chasing.Hence its table grade NPA that the fight is over because thats where the money is.

 

Agree, we could expect to see this trend towards lower NPA grades continue if Manuka gate prices continue to escalate (seemingly on a exponential growth curve!) +55% this year! This increase far exceeds the increasing costs of production.

There are some very wealthy Manuka beeks out there; packers & marketers can't increase prices that much, they're cutting their margins. If you think they're making big profits, see their annual accounts - some of them are publicly owned. [written as a counterbalance to what @@tony wrote in post #47 about "the scales are leaning far to one side.]

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I do understand all that, we have shears in such companys but just because they may not make money in a certian year doesn't mean that they have done things right or marketing the right product or they have but money has been spent in other investments.

I don't mean to get away from the topic and get into a price discussion the point was if we over price product it won't sell and more so in the nz market, and this is one of the reasons we seeing more table grade manuka sort after it a bigger market and with that we see the problems we see, along with not being able to produce enough of it for the demand this puts us in a good position, we just need a standard now to enhance that position

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Just thinking out loud.

 

Assuming the Manuka standard comes back with specific chemical markers that need to be present to be able to label a honey as Manuka.

 

Will there be testing of Australian Manuka honey to test if that honey has those specific markers?

If ozzie Manuka has those markers then I imagine it will be full steam ahead for oz manuka if it dosn't will that mean they are no longer able to sell their jellybush honey under a manuka label?

.

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Will there be testing of Australian Manuka honey to test if that honey has those specific markers?

.

 

Yes - that testing is being done currently

 

If ozzie Manuka has those markers then I imagine it will be full steam ahead for oz manuka if it dosn't will that mean they are no longer able to sell their jellybush honey under a manuka label?

.

 

The DNA test for Manuka/Kanuka does not detect jellybush. I believe the chemical tests also differentiate L. scoparium from L. polygalifolium (jellybush)

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@JohnF if the "test" can differentiate and the "test" is used to define a standard that must mean that jellybush will no longer be allowed to be labelled as Manuka?

 

Or will all Leptospermum regardless of type ( or whatever the proper word is ) be allowed to be labelled Manuka?

 

Rather than scoparium specifically .

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In New Zealand Frazz - but would that standard apply to Australia? manuka is not trademarked as far as I know but could it be used as a provenance name I wonder like eg Champagne and Parma ham?

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so i have to wonder if the standard is not applicable outside NZ and ozzy honey can be labelled Manuka when it dosnt meet the NZ definition/ standard then could any old ozzy honey be labelled and packed as Manuka because they dont have a standard of their own?

 

Or do they go by the Codex standard?

Which up until recently was the predominant standard for defining Manuka?

 

Could honey from NZ be sent in bulk to Oz and packed as Manuka if it didnt meet the NZ Manuka standard?

.

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I suggest that a quick look at FSANZ will show that Australia and NZ Food Safety organisations are linked at the hip.

 

Food Standards Australia New Zealand

 

NZ will not be doing these changes without consultation with Australia at National and State level.

 

At the Apiculture conference, it was stated by Jim Sim from MPI that Yes, manuka honey could be repackaged or relabelled to state information that is not permitted in NZ - health claims not permitted as it is a food - UMF claims etc.

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So in reality the new standard and also the revised labelling laws will only impact honey thats labelled in NZ or sold in NZ?

 

If its exported in bulk the company at the receiving end can label it as they wish?

Kind of defeats the purpose dosn't it ?

.

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So in reality the new standard and also the revised labelling laws will only impact honey thats labelled in NZ or sold in NZ?

 

If its exported in bulk the company at the receiving end can label it as they wish?

Kind of defeats the purpose dosn't it ?

.

 

If the receivers know that the adulteration can be detected by the new tests (likely to be available overseas) then they may be less likely to blend/cut/adulterate. Perhaps not - but at least NZ will not be implicated we hope

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What does melamine taste like ?

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adulteration can be detected by the new tests (likely to be available overseas) then they may be less likely to blend/cut/adulterate.

 

I suppose it depends on where the bench mark is set.

Currently you can sell active honey labelled as Manuka when the Manuka content is actually quite low, alot lower than the codex rules allow for other honeys with mono-floral labels.

 

but at least NZ will not be implicated we hope

 

Surely alot of the "blending/adulteration" and mislabelling is already happening offshore?

.

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Frazzled here are the new guidelines for defining Manuka Honey and how it must be labelled in NZ.

Ministry for Primary Industries > Food > Food Safety > Manuka Honey

All the MPI links are above

http://www.foodsafety.govt.nz/elibrary/industry/2014-guide-to-meet-honey-labelling-requirements.pdf

The labelling guidelines meet the New Zealand Food Act and Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code (the Code).

It can be no longer promoted for medicinal benefits - it is considered a food and not a medicine.

No therapeutic claims are permitted any longer.

And you must be compliant on the start date, no lead in or lag time permitted.

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May this be a beginning of an end?

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@Don Mac DHA, MGO only present in Manuka honey?

 

If so is there a minimum amount that has to be present to identify a honey as Manuka?

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You can state the level of DHA and MGO on your label. That is acceptable.

But you cannot associate the level with a health claim - see Q8 of Questions and Answers in the first link.

Note this is an interim guide only until the full definition of manuka honey is agreed to - refer to John F's comments in this thread.

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DHA and methyglyoxil (or however it is spelt) are apparently being imported into New Zealand.I have no direct proof of this but 5 min on the Internet will show how easy it is to obtain.

Rewa rewa and beech honeydew both in very short supply and coincidentally are also good extenders for manuka honey.

There are no proven health benefits from active manuka other than treating external wounds.

Under current proposals it appears likely that if markers can be found them the honey will still only have to be 50% pure manuka. What is the bet that 50% suddenly becomes the new pure.

I have an answer for the whole problem.

Check your honey when you take it off. If it is jellylike and you are not in ling heather area then it is manuka full stop. All you have to do then is not adulterate it although you could test it for non-peroxide activity if it is intended to be used for external wound dressings.

Isn't it amazing that it seems likely honest beekeepers who produce non-active manuka will deliberately squeezed out of the market by lies, half-truths and flummery.

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What is the bet that 50% suddenly becomes the new pure.

 

Isn't it amazing that it seems likely honest beekeepers who produce non-active manuka will deliberately squeezed out of the market by lies, half-truths and flummery.

 

This is what concerns me the most, active honey is not necessarily good monofloral Manuka honey. And top quality Manuka honey with a high percentage of Manuka nectar but no activity may be unable to be labelled as Manuka.

Theres something very wrong with that.

 

I imagine if it came down to it there would be a few beekeepers getting together and taking it to court.

.

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