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pussy willow honeydew


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I've never heard of bees working pussy willow honey dew , interesting. There are probably hundreds of different types of honey dew around the world and quite a few different types in New Zealand one of the more exotic being oak. Some honey dew is very nice and some, well! Bees around home are working overripe fruit at the moment which is a sure indication nothing much is happening.I would be a little bit careful tasting honey in the far north at this time of year as they may also be getting tutu honeydew.

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I've never heard of bees working pussy willow honey dew , interesting. There are probably hundreds of different types of honey dew around the world and quite a few different types in New Zealand one of the more exotic being oak. Some honey dew is very nice and some, well! Bees around home are working overripe fruit at the moment which is a sure indication nothing much is happening.I would be a little bit careful tasting honey in the far north at this time of year as they may also be getting tutu honeydew.

Hi John Berry , Yeap it sure is pussy willow , if you stand near the trees it sounds like a swarm . tried some today [honey that is ],it has a very slight after taste not unpleasant, it will be good for the mead.Out of interest what fruit is ripening this time of year in Hawkes bay ? Plums ? Not much tutu here but lots of pohutakawa and privit . thanks for your feedback John hope your bees make something happen soon . cheers Paul

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had a call out for swarms at the camping ground.

usually don't get my hopes up when people phone me to collect swarms, but this time they had convinced me that it was worth the afford. didn't expect that but:

 

the weeping willows that they pruned last year are dripping with sap down onto the tents and are loaded with bees. the campers tried to wash the bees of and now they got big foot disease:D.

will find out tomorrow how bad willow dew tasts. hope the campers won't get the fly spray out. i got a few hives close by and they still got their honey on. would consider shifting, but 500m down the road someone brings a load of 50 in lately and i guess most are his.

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Thanks for that , a pic wont work as the trees are 30 ft high, I have another question ...... checked the hive and found lots of capped brood only a few grubs , no eggs , no queen cells and tons and tons of bees , the question is can the Q go on holiday and not lay till they need more bees ? looks like a honey flow on too . We pulled a frame of honey { the pussy willow dew } our first frame of liquid gold.

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You wouldn't normally have a queen stop laying at this time of year for no reason.

 

If i came across a hive like yours in one of our yards the first thing i would do is make sure she hasn't got through into the honey box. If she isn't up there i would go through the hive to see if theres any eggs anywhere. If no eggs i would be thinking shes either dead or in the process of being superceded,

 

swarming would be down on my list but not impossible especially if the queen is old.

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agree with Frazz.

additional, check out the thread "multiple new queen failures"

taipa was the first place i ever came across this condition, so should be well established there.

 

no expert on honey dew, but maybe the dew has flooded the pollen stores in the hive and no new pollen coming in, cos bees are all on honey dew. no pollen, no brood?

but should still have a few eggs somewhere, i guess.

 

not sure what causes the honey dew here. what do aphids look like?

would be good to have a collection of dew producers under resources.

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I would be very interested in getting hold of some of this. Very $$$ interested.

Hi Love honey , This is my first hive and already taken 10 kg off , the honey dew is very sickly sweet and is already fermenting into mead , Thanks for the offer but all we produce gets used for mead , cooking or plain eating.I will keep your number handy in case I have way too much and want to flick some off to you.

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Hi Love honey , This is my first hive and already taken 10 kg off , the honey dew is very sickly sweet and is already fermenting into mead , Thanks for the offer but all we produce gets used for mead , cooking or plain eating.I will keep your number handy in case I have way too much and want to flick some off to you.

 

 

High moisture content is a rather different story.

 

Are the bees evaporating it down properly?

 

My focus was on the Oak honeydew, that John Berry mentioned. it has a very interesting story attached.

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oak honeydew is delicious. not so sure about that willow stuff. seems to granulate very fast.

had to put boxes on. something i've never done before in january, but the flow is intense.

 

i've seen honey fermenting in the frames in Taipa before. the humididty is so high and the temperatures so warm, day and night. so the bees seem to have real difficulties to dry the nectar/dew. similar like in the tropics

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Hi Tom , You are right there , theres still lots of uncapped honey , I have taken about 15 kg off so far from one hive in its first season , every 4-5 days another 2-3 frames are ready, my next mission is to do my first split next month.cheers for your feed back all

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