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Battle of the sexes


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An appeal to 'instinct', like 'stress', are weasel-words to look out for which to me indicate a study that couldn't explain anthing. The behaviour "could not be explained by genetics", and yet these maternal behaviours "are conserved by evolution." Hmm. How?

I wonder if it will get published. Maybe it will make more sense.

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I would think they lack the equipment to gather pollen and nectar.

But I share your observation about dem drones hanging around on the brood frames. What for?

Mum is too pregnant and busy laying eggs and Dads has to hang around the young one teaching them their roles. Getting fed by the workers is a practical exercise. Showing by example how to feed the young. The teaching is "do what I tell you and not what I do". Now and again they have to leave home to do an honourable sacrificial thing for the colony( like most dads have to do). Then when dads get old and kids get wiser and not much food in the larder, they get sent out to pasture.

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in which females are more closely related to their sisters than other relatives.......

The study, by researchers from the Universities of Edinburgh, Oxford and St Andrews and Auburn University in the US, overturns the longstanding theory which suggests that an instinctive drive to help individuals with whom they share more genes is the reason why females assist in rearing the queen's young."[/i]

 

Contact: Catriona Kelly

44-131-651-4401

University of Edinburgh

Heard this theory all my life, in relation to any number of animals. To me, it never rang true, it's a kind of blend of (now discredited) Freudian psychology of sex and genetics, mixed with Darwinian theory of evolution, glad these guys have rejected it at least for bees and ants. Although no doubt the "experts" will switch theories again and again, sometimes they are pretty stupid.

 

Dr Laura Ross, of the University of Edinburgh's School of Biological Sciences, who led the study, said: "The best explanation for why females are more inclined to help in rearing the queen's offspring is that they are already equipped with maternal behaviours preserved through evolution. In contrast, males aren't usually involved in parental care, and so they don't have the skills required."[/i]

 

Contact: Catriona Kelly

44-131-651-4401

University of Edinburgh

Well that statement is a waste of space also. It says they've got it sussed why a social insect colony would be structured this way, and bees and ants are the example. But if so why doesn't it hold true for termites?

I still think my explanation in post 18 is the best. ;)

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It is more genetics.

 

Who knows how it was 1 million years ago? However we know the drones will not survive the winter(this is a genetic mistery).

 

Who will take care of the brood in early spring if there are no drones? And why do they not take part of the works once they are in the season? They don't seem to have too many abilities ...... and they are weak.

 

They may be able to fight each other(drone vs drone) especially in the race for mating the queen.

However if drones will have the ability to forage in their life a low number of them will be ready to mate the virgin queen.

A tired male is not the best mating "material".

This will result in poor fertilization and the descendants will be weak, with shorter life span and the specie will not survive.

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A tired male is not the best mating "material".

This will result in poor fertilization and the descendants will be weak, with shorter life span and the specie will not survive.

 

this is an interesting theory that screams for a low change.

makes child and slave labor look rather harmless.

stop male labor to save the human species, i say!!

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