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Biodynamic Beekeeping


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What is the difference between a bee-“keeper” and a bee-“haver”? This question is laid to rest by the proponents of biodynamic beekeeping. The aim of biodynamic beekeeping is “to minimize stress factors and allow bees to develop in accordance with their true nature.”

 

Supporters of biodynamic beekeeping, insist that biodynamic beekeepers neither “have” nor “keep” bees but simply provide them with “a clean place to live.” Practical-crafts teacher Keith Gelber likes to think of himself as a bee “steward.”

 

Gelber keeps bees in accordance with the Demeter International Bee Standards. This group maintains a strict set of rules that must be followed in order for honey to bear their seal of approval. All types of standards are spelled out including how bees are raised, how honey is processed, and what containers may be used.

  • Natural combs are used, rather than foundation.
  • Swarming is recognized as the natural form of colony reproduction.
  • Clipping of queen’s wings is prohibited.
  • Regular and systematic queen replacement is prohibited.
  • Pollen substitutes are prohibited.
  • Beehives must be made of all natural materials, such as wood, straw, or clay.
  • Artificial insemination is not used. Instead queens are allowed to fly free to mate.
  • Grafting of larvae to produce queens is prohibited.
  • No pesticides or antibiotics are allowed, although the use of natural organic acids such as formic and oxalic acid may be used for mite control.
  • Honey may be transported in containers made of artificial materials but must be decanted into containers of glass or metal for retail sale.

Gelber takes surplus honey from the hive only in the spring after the bees use what they need—an idea that makes a lot of sense but requires a world of self-discipline.

 

Thoughts....?

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I would think the owners? of such bee hosting methods need to wear a loin cloth made out of fig leaves, carry a club, live in cave and only use fire to offer up sacrifices to the gods on every blue moon. Come on guys mankind was given minds, we should use them to develop the creation that's around us in a sustainable way for the betterment of all mankind, and yes we should tread lightly upon the earth and be good caretakers of this wondrous world we call home.

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All this is easy doable, but cost of transffer to this who will pay me here - no one. Also the reasonable price for such honey would pay me no one here.

After all I have to be a millionaire to afford such extravaganza.. Cause from month to month you struggle to survive and take care for family all this sounds like snobbism.

With ever present good beekeeping practice I have high quality honey and top health of colonies. I personally doubt there is any or significant difference of honey quality and safety to people of this bio and my "non bio".. It is more advertisement to me..

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I had a fella ring me the other day to ask about bee keeping, he said he had just inherited truck load of hives from his deceased father, the hives had not been worked for a number of years as his Dad had not been well. I asked how were the hives, his words "some seemed sick so I burnt them". I asked was it AFB, his answer "what's that". This young man wanted to use all the new technologies so that he would not have go near the bees or need to extract the honey more than twice a year. Duh!!

Bee keeping is not just a fanciful idea, it is really hard and some times painful work, it's not for wimps or do-gooders, beekeeping is for those who love the outdoors, loves the sounds & smells, loves the challenges and most of all loves his bees.

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Their are alot of different views opinions around beekeeping, from one end of the spectrum bio dynamics, to organic, throught todays beekeeping. Gaining knowledge and reading about these is important. Not one system is flawless and integrating concepts may be the key.

 

Will I be practicing these principles no but I was interested in seeing if any one did, due to the presents of varroa and other pests diseases.

 

Some beef and sheep farmers are now ingerating principles from bio dynamic and organic into their farming practices if you dont understand these then misconceptions occur. If you dont have that knowledge go read up on them some points are valid and some are not you might be surprised or think the whole concept is rubbish still.

 

At the end of the day as long as you at not spreading pest and dieases, you are providing food for you bees and making sure they are healthy and complying with the regulations to protect the industry that is the key, and for the commercials making money it is there business after all, and as hobbyists we need to understand that to and not affect these guys.

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Their are alot of different views opinions around beekeeping, from one end of the spectrum bio dynamics, to organic, throught todays beekeeping. Gaining knowledge and reading about these is important. Not one system is flawless and integrating concepts may be the key.

 

Will I be practicing these principles no but I was interested in seeing if any one did, due to the presents of varroa and other pests diseases.

 

Some beef and sheep farmers are now ingerating principles from bio dynamic and organic into their farming practices if you dont understand these then misconceptions occur. If you dont have that knowledge go read up on them some points are valid and some are not you might be surprised or think the whole concept is rubbish still.

 

At the end of the day as long as you at not spreading pest and dieases, you are providing food for you bees and making sure they are healthy and complying with the regulations to protect the industry that is the key, and for the commercials making money it is there business after all, and as hobbyists we need to understand that to and not affect these guys.

 

I've read Rudolf, interesting bloke, very cleaver, bordering on a brilliant sci-fi writer and heavily into mesclin. Today, he would be incarcerated as a drug user and wacko ... but I'll be blowed if many of his theories seem to work ?

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  • Natural combs are used, rather than foundation. * Instead of wires I can use wooden "barbecue sticks"
  • Swarming is recognized as the natural form of colony reproduction. * With management I reduce the swarming, or intended splitting
  • Clipping of queen’s wings is prohibited. * I never clipped queen's wings.
  • Regular and systematic queen replacement is prohibited. *I replace queens more cause of failing than of age. So will adapt easily.
  • Pollen substitutes are prohibited. * I use only in winter defat soya flour more for to have better consistency of pattie than to bees have benefit of such protein content. So not necessary.
  • Beehives must be made of all natural materials, such as wood, straw, or clay.. * All my hives are wooden, painted with water based colors - majority. But evenso in this case I would have to replace all boxes and use untreated..
  • Artificial insemination is not used. Instead queens are allowed to fly free to mate. * My queens are open mated.
  • Grafting of larvae to produce queens is prohibited. * I don't graft ( jenter mostly when scheduled qrearing).
  • No pesticides or antibiotics are allowed, although the use of natural organic acids such as formic and oxalic acid may be used for mite control. *I used chemicals, but from this season intend to avoid it by using formic acid, will see. For winter treatment obligatory I use oxalic acid. Also chemicals I use only in summer after last extraction. To don't get me wrong chemicals are against varroa. Antibiotics never used and also are already forbidden over here. As prevention against N. cerana I use nozevit - " eco" or "bio", whatever you call it. For chalk brood only formic for intensifiing cleaning, requeening.
  • Honey may be transported in containers made of artificial materials but must be decanted into containers of glass or metal for retail sale. *I use metal barrels painted inside with food grade paint.

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All this is easy doable, but cost of transffer to this who will pay me here - no one. Also the reasonable price for such honey would pay me no one here.

After all I have to be a millionaire to afford such extravaganza.. Cause from month to month you struggle to survive and take care for family all this sounds like snobbism.

With ever present good beekeeping practice I have high quality honey and top health of colonies. I personally doubt there is any or significant difference of honey quality and safety to people of this bio and my "non bio".. It is more advertisement to me..

 

 

Hi Goran

I am interested to know what your annual varroa treatment programme is in your own hives, how often with what over a year etc. I have been using your tea as disscussed and liking the results, even if its placebo as some suggest. Thanx

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I have been using your tea as disscussed and liking the results, even if its placebo as some suggest. Thanx

 

so what does this secret tea have to do with mescaline?

if you cut me in, there are some interesting varieties of shrooms in the coromadel.....

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Talking about biodynamic beekeeping.When I was in Arizona with Dee Lusby at her treatment free beekeeping conference this subject came up.For varroa control the bio stanards allow the use of Formic and Oxalic acid.The reason they allow this standard is they do not want to see dying bees.I asked them,how can the bee fight varroa or become adapted to live with varroa when chemicals are used.My grandchildren will know bees without humn intervention.

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nothing to see here, i lived on the Coromandel, seen it all :)

even the purple once, shaped like little potatoes, in the mine shafts?

i bet you haven't had those, not even alice and the rabit new about them when i spoke to them last time.....

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