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Chances are the other hive will not get AFB.

 

Here is a suggested action plan. Your gear such as gloves, bee suit etc can be washed in the washing machine a couple of times, after that spore counts will be too low on them to pass on enough spores to cause an infection. Smoker and hive tool should be treated with bleach, which breaks down AFB spores, take care to work the bleach into any dirt, propolis, etc.

 

The hive can be quarantined, ie, you do not transfer any hive parts from it to any other hives, and inspect it regularly. Many beekeepers only quarantine other hives for 12 months but if you want to be really sure quarantine for 24 months then consider it clean.

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Chances are the other hive will not get AFB.

 

Here is a suggested action plan. Your gear such as gloves, bee suit etc can be washed in the washing machine a couple of times, after that spore counts will be too low on them to pass on enough spores to cause an infection. Smoker and hive tool should be treated with bleach, which breaks down AFB spores, take care to work the bleach into any dirt, propolis, etc.

 

The hive can be quarantined, ie, you do not transfer any hive parts from it to any other hives, and inspect it regularly. Many beekeepers only quarantine other hives for 12 months but if you want to be really sure quarantine for 24 months then consider it clean.

 

Thanks yes that's the plan just means setting up my other apiary early was going to use this year to kill wasps don't want to chance it I'll just keep one hive here if it looks OK next spring I could split it but keep both hives here for one more year .I liked the idea of having hives at the back door to graft from :D

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absolutely totally gutted for you glynn :(

but you did well to find it, and i do think those that sold it to you should be informed, cos looking at those pics they would be very likely to have more hives like that. Its not just one cell infected, that looks like quite a large infection to my untrained eyes?

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Glynn well done you for spotting this :)

 

I'm pretty sure it's illegal to keep AFB frames for any purpose but check up on that.

 

And the only other thing would be it's best to burn in an open pit and then bury the residue as there's always a certain amount of wax thats not burnt properly and can be access by bees afterwards is burned in a drum.

 

Although having said that it may just be our paranoia and the fire in the drum may be hot enough to kill all the spores but it's something we don't do opting for the burn and bury method :)

 

Sorry if I've sounded negative cos it's not meant that way I think you have done an awesome job :)

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@@frazzledfozzle I've been in contact with the right people frames of AFB are hard to find for taking courses so if my hives can be used I feel some good has come out of this ,I got to look at someone's frames with AFB and that helped me more than photos in a book .

With the drum I cut flaps in the sides so it made a vortex in side and sat the Queen excluder on that so only ash got through the drum got so hot it was glowing red and has melted a bit so I think it was hot enough I had it up on bricks on concrete and could see the glow under in as well the ash and wire is buried now

And as for plastic frames I only had two and they burned like the rest I tried to take photos but could not get close enough

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And I've called the seller at the moment I'm more concerned about the other hives that have been sold and getting them tracked down and checked there was a lot of hive around the area so ??? I've talked to Marco from Asurequality and tried to email him but must of wrote it down wrong so will have to try again

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nice setup with the drum.

good thing it was at night, plastic frames burn black as night ;)

 

It was so hot had flames 15 feet in the air maybe higher that photo was soon after I lit it I melted the plastic drum you can see it the photo :rolleyes:

Yes macro boxes burn well pine from now on :(

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And I've called the seller at the moment I'm more concerned about the other hives that have been sold and getting them tracked down and checked there was a lot of hive around the area so ??? I've talked to Marco from Asurequality and tried to email him but must of wrote it down wrong so will have to try again

 

Hi Everyone

The AFB Management Agency is working on finding the potential source of this AFB incident, both buyer and seller are being cooperative. This will involve inspections of hives of the beekeeper who supplied the hive and hives surrounding this apiary site, but also beehives in the vicinity of Glyns' apiary site as there is a chance this (strong) hive got AFB by robbing an AFB infected hive in his neighbourhood within the last 6 weeks.

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Glynn well done you for spotting this :)

 

I'm pretty sure it's illegal to keep AFB frames for any purpose but check up on that.

 

And the only other thing would be it's best to burn in an open pit and then bury the residue as there's always a certain amount of wax thats not burnt properly and can be access by bees afterwards is burned in a drum.

 

Although having said that it may just be our paranoia and the fire in the drum may be hot enough to kill all the spores but it's something we don't do opting for the burn and bury method :)

 

Sorry if I've sounded negative cos it's not meant that way I think you have done an awesome job :)

 

HI Glynn

It is illegal to keep AFB infected gear unless you have written permission from the AFB Management Agency. You can apply for a permit to keep this frame for educational purposes by sending an e-mail to Rex Baynes at: rbaynes@ihug.co.nz

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Hi Everyone

The AFB Management Agency is working on finding the potential source of this AFB incident, both buyer and seller are being cooperative. This will involve inspections of hives of the beekeeper who supplied the hive and hives surrounding this apiary site, but also beehives in the vicinity of Glyns' apiary site as there is a chance this (strong) hive got AFB by robbing an AFB infected hive in his neighbourhood within the last 6 weeks.

good work all people involved
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HI Glynn

It is illegal to keep AFB infected gear unless you have written permission from the AFB Management Agency. You can apply for a permit to keep this frame for educational purposes by sending an e-mail to Rex Baynes at: rbaynes@ihug.co.nz

 

Hi to clear up the person I'm giving the frames to does have a permit to hold Afb infected frames I'm not keeping them myself they are to be used in AFB courses

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Nice photos. Looks like a light to moderate infection. Some infections develop very fast and some don't so it's very hard to tell whether it would have shown visual signs when you first brought it. You are unlikely to have spread the disease on your gloves or hive tool, foulbrood is actually quite difficult to spread especially when the infestation is only light. Well done for finding the problem in dealing with it before it could spread. I got my first hive when I was about nine and had to burn it a year later, fortunately I've never had 100% infection since.

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