Jump to content

A Review of Treatment Options for Control of Varroa Mite in New Zealand


Recommended Posts

Derek submitted a new resource:

 

A Review of Treatment Options for Control of Varroa Mite in New Zealand - varroa treatment options

 

The objective of this project was to provide a comprehensive review of the treatment options

available and potentially available to New Zealand beekeepers for the control of varroa. The

project was carried out under contract to the New Zealand Ministry of Agriculture and

Forestry (Contract number RFQ/BER/4/2000).

Resources used to carry out the review included a database search of Commonwealth

Agriculture Bureau (CAB) abstracts, an Internet web search, and a search of files and books

held by...

 

Read more about this resource...

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 17
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Given that this report was produced in Feb 2001, with most of it's referenced material dating from the 90's, how is it's relevance now?

There are many more options available today, and methods of application for some products, such as (yes, it is my favorite) Oxalic vapor are not discussed.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Given that this report was produced in Feb 2001, with most of it's referenced material dating from the 90's, how is it's relevance now?

There are many more options available today, and methods of application for some products, such as (yes, it is my favorite) Oxalic vapor are not discussed.

 

From what I gather it's as relevant now as it was then, a couple of compounds are still not available and unlikely to become available. I'm not sure what the "many more options" are ?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Given that this report was produced in Feb 2001, with most of it's referenced material dating from the 90's, how is it's relevance now?

There are many more options available today, and methods of application for some products, such as (yes, it is my favorite) Oxalic vapor are not discussed.

Well :D I'm glad you asked!

- active ingredient, hasn't changed

- chemical class, hasn't changed

- method of application, hasn't changed

- effectiveness, changed slightly

- adverse effects, hasn't changed

- operator safety, hasn't changed

- LD50, hasn't changed

- residues, hasn't changed

- MRL, I don't know much about this to be honest

As for the rest.. Well, perhaps the cost etc has changed slightly, but on the whole this is a solid document and worth a read, then at least you have a jumping off point for how nasty the things you are putting in your hives are, instead of having absolutely no idea until its too late.

I have read this a few times and it's the first thing I go back to if I want an answer about a treatment.

 

Of course things have changed since 2001.

And yes it is not a complete list of all treatments used, but that doesn't mean it's not still helpful for the ones that are included within it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Oxalic vapor are not discussed.

Generic oxalic.

Active ingredient - oxalic acid

Control efficacy - 82-99%

Treatment period - autumn

Adverse effects - reduced brood in spring

Residue problems - honey taste

MRL(ppm) - (honey 400-900) (wax none)

LD50 - 375

Operator safety - corrosive

Resistance - none

Cost - $0.02 to $0.15

Visits - 1-2

 

Maybe outdated, but that's what it says on oxalic that I could see

Link to post
Share on other sites

Vapor acts on the mites in a different way than syrup dribble or spray.

It seems to me from my research, that in Europe, that mite treatment with organic acid vapors has become (after many decades) a preferred and recommended treatment option, due partly to the fact that oxalic and formic acids are found naturally in honey and that vapor uses and extremely low dose (2g for a 2 story brood hive as opposed to between 25 and 60g for syrup dribble) but with continued good efficacy.

 

Like you @@Daley I have been using this document frequently, and it has been the starting point of all of my research.

 

- method of application, hasn't changed

- effectiveness, changed slightly

- adverse effects, hasn't changed

 

However, I believe, on this you are wrong.

 

Given that the method of application has changed (and is not discussed in this document at all), and as a result the dosage rate, and again, the negative effects as a result of the lower dosage per bee and different mode of action, I still say this part of the document is outdated.

 

A quick search;

Oxalic Acid: Heat Vaporization and Other Methods: Part 2 of 2 Parts @ Scientific Beekeeping

Oxalic Acid Vapourisation - as a treatment against Varroa

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQp9pdAOjdo the Fat bee Man

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yno71qdfR98

 

Now I'm not saying that this is the be all and end all, and that something is not better. I suspect I'll be researching this 'till the day I die and I pray that something better comes along.

 

Hey, we are only talking about 1 part of the whole document.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have just experienced formic for the first time. Decanting a litre from a brimming carboy. Took about 3 seconds to get a sore bit on my ear. The stuff's not as bad to handle as various concrete cleaners. I stink of lemongrass oil now too, thanks to Alastair's recommendation to put half a drop on top of a frame before the formic. I'm not holding my breath (although I was for a while) about the formic effectiveness, we're getting mildish days but still freezing at night. I'm giving it 24 hours 10am to 10am, 85 mils at 50% strength. Haven't done a sophisticated mite survey, just haven't seen any. The bees are really annoyed about the blockage in their front door at prime time !

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

After a not very warm 24 hours had a modest mite drop of around 20 or so per hive. Found a couple of young wingless bees wandering around outside. I have a feeling it's been far too cold for formic to do it's thing. Annoying, I don't want to have to Bayvarol Blast. The book says to use formic when temps are 10 - 30 degrees, which really doesn't happen here before early summer when the kanuka is starting. The trouble is the darn mites have also more than started, they're nearly winning by then. I've started to wonder about sitting a horticultural heat pad (old electric blanket ?) on top of the evaporator for the duration of the formic treatment. Shouldn't be too onerous for a two hive hobbiest....found an old blanket in a wardrobe, I'll do it. After tea.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Dont you hate it when Trevor deflates your balloon even further :(

 

I am all for the alternate treatments. I also find it very hard to keep them up. When you have to do so many of the alternate treatments compared to the synthetic treatments.

I think we all need to experiment with the alternate ones until someone finds something that is at least almost equal to the synthetics. As we all know, the synthetics have a limited shelf life (resistance)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just been reading Miteaway instructions. Contrary to Alastairs closing the entrance down they say sufficient ventilation is critical, even to the point of sliding storeys back to provide more. Have popped another 100 ml on top this morning & left entrance & mesh access open

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...