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no, being wind pollinated they are likely to have a low protein content and/or incomplete amino acid profile.

 

Some of my girls are bordered by an olive block and they're just not interested in the trees at all. Good forage underneath since it doesn't get mown much.. but the trees themselves are not valuable.

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I

Are olive tree a good source of pollen or nectar for bees?

The neighbour has about 500 trees and I have heard that they mainly rely on the wind for pollination.

Does your 'neighbour' spray for pests such as 'thrips'?

Probably not, but better to find out before you put your hives there!(y)

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I have two olive tree more than 12 years old, one has never flowered, one I noticed it flowering three consecutive years but not an olive. I have one hive directly below it. Not seen a bee on any of its flower. Need more info. Is it one of those that needs a male and female plant?

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My understanding is that they have a male which never produces fruit and a hermaphrodite (male and female) that does.So the hermaphrodite can self pollinate or be cross pollinated form another hermaphrodite or another male.Also most olive tress that are grown from seed will never produce olives and that all commercial olive groves are planted from cuttings.

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Its funny because the neighbour spent thousands of dollars putting in an irrigation system he has never used in fact he has had to spend thousands more on drainage because its far too wet.Planting a crop that prefers an arid climate and rocky/sandy soil in the swampy Waikato was probably not the best call.:)

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:rofl:

lack of planning. seen that with some orchards, they try and squeeze as many tress in there as they can. a few years later they have to spend lots on cutting the trees out !

For some orchards - like citrus - that is 'normal'. You overplant and then thin them out.

As the trees grow, they take up more space and produce higher yields. If you don't thin them out, the canopy will not let enough sun to the lower fruit.

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yes, but you don't plant them as close as i was referring. you get at least a few crops off before you start having to thin them out. they simply didn't plan on the growth and position accordingly. seen them planted up against shelter belts and access ways. 1-2 seasons growth and they have to cut their way into the orchard !

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