Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 69
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

it is designed so that you can place one two or three boxes along it but as it has an internal area about the same size as 3 1/2 standard full-size boxes there shouldn't be any need and it would kind of defeat the purpose. I did get the bees to fill some glass jars with comb honey by placing them in an empty box above the brood nest by placing them upside down over 50 mm holes. Not very practical but great fun. Unfortunately the honey flow cut out before they were completely full but I hope to do a few more this year.

Link to post
Share on other sites
it is designed so that you can place one two or three boxes along it .

 

Might be a great way to answer that question of whether the bees prefer to go up or along, John. Put a super up over the brood nest, divide any full frames already outside the brood nest between the super and the side, and see where they choose to go. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

hi Roger

I just found your posting on my file . I didn't know you could do that and have no idea how to reply on yours. The 23 x 10 mm rebate is for joining the ends onto the sides in the same way as a normal box is constructed. You could just do a but joint but it wouldn't be as strong . My long hive is going well at the moment but I am more and more convinced that bees prefer to work in a vertical plane rather than a horizontal one. For someone with just one or two hives it is a beautifully easy system to work with.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks John. Yes, I figured out the rebate. I am going ahead with the long hive but have been thinking of reducing the length to 810mm and adding supers if the bees need the space for honey, likely with an excluder. Reason is to work in multiples of a hive cover at 510 x 405 so as to use standard equipment where possible. If I do that I guess I'll end up with 21'sh frames in the brood box. Am I over complicating things? Do you use an excluder to get honey only at the end of your long hive. I like the form of the long hive in an urban setting as the hive will be adjacent to a Reserve in Remuera. Any comments would be appreciated.

Link to post
Share on other sites

hi Roger

I haven't used in excluder with it in fact the biggest problem I have is getting it to breed in more frames . Having the entrance in the middle of the box may overcome this problem but would split the honey stores in two for the winter which would certainly have consequences in a colder climate but probably wouldn't affect you their. I often have to move the honey awaiting the brood nest and add new frames between the frames brood. There is probably enough room in my design to have no need to put additional supers on the hive but you will find that if you do they will put all their energies into going up rather than along. I have seen quite a few pictures of hives that were two box equivalent side by side and am sure this would work along with one or two honey supers but it does kind of defeat the purpose of having a long hive. I have always assumed that bees naturally had the brood nest at the bottom of the hive , but I'm beginning to wonder if they put the brood nest where the entrance is.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have always assumed that bees naturally had the brood nest at the bottom of the hive , but I'm beginning to wonder if they put the brood nest where the entrance is.

 

That is exactly what I found when I removed a hive from a wall. The brrod acutually covered the entrance hole with the brood area.

Maybe it would be an experiment someone could do with a standard hive or move a brood chamber in a longhive. Then see if the bees move it back to the entrance.

Link to post
Share on other sites
hi Roger

I haven't used in excluder with it in fact the biggest problem I have is getting it to breed in more frames . Having the entrance in the middle of the box may overcome this problem but would split the honey stores in two for the winter which would certainly have consequences in a colder climate but probably wouldn't affect you their. I often have to move the honey awaiting the brood nest and add new frames between the frames brood. There is probably enough room in my design to have no need to put additional supers on the hive but you will find that if you do they will put all their energies into going up rather than along. I have seen quite a few pictures of hives that were two box equivalent side by side and am sure this would work along with one or two honey supers but it does kind of defeat the purpose of having a long hive. I have always assumed that bees naturally had the brood nest at the bottom of the hive , but I'm beginning to wonder if they put the brood nest where the entrance is.

 

Thanks John. I know the hybrid defeats the long hive in some ways but it is an option if the long hive is full. Are you getting stores at the end of your hive? One of the reasons I wanted to have the option to super up was in the case where either the long hive was full (big yay I know) or if they ignored the extremities and looked like swarming.

 

On a related matter I am in two minds as to whether to have end or side entrances. If your insights, and Trevor's view of brood at the entrance in a feral hive mentioned below, are correct then perhaps I will go with an end entrance. I may drill and plug side entrances so they are ready if needed.

 

Any other comments are welcomed especially regarding entrances and supering.

 

Cheers

 

Roger

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I've always noticed that hives that have fallen over sideways never seem to prosper as well as a hive of the same dimensions in a vertical position. Yes the queen carries on laying and bees hatch etc, but they have always done better once they were stood up again. Just an observation.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Auckland Beekeepers Club has a long hive. The brood is somewhere in the centre (side entrance), with modified vertical queen excluders for the side "supers" and normal Q/Es on top, with supers above. It is also possible to run two queens on either end with a "super"in the middle

Link to post
Share on other sites

2

long hive was very popular in Finland 50 y ago. now now one use them.

one reason is that colonies of modern queens are three times bigger than on those "golden German Black bee day",

Colony has difficulties to handle horizontal space.

 

you may see in Hungary that they have horizoltal hives and not supers. They carry extractor to field and extract frame which has brood and honey.

 

guys here have tried modern long hives but they say that hives have high tendency to swarm.

 

it is very different to put 20 or 60 frames in horizontal position.

 

horizontal hives are numerous in different countries but they are allways small colonies.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have started migrating from a TBH to a Langstroth based system for my new hives - persevering with my first hive as a TBH. What I have done is cut plastic foundation to fit the TBH profile and screwed it to the top bar - it allows normal inspections. I have a couple of comb collapses through mis handling. Some may consider this option as an alternative to a building frame around the TBH bars. I think I will do this with all the bars over time.

 

To populate my first Lang hive I took five frames that had the foundations cutout as per the picture and reattached the frame to new top bars at Lang dimensions. Now hanging in the FD box along with four wooden FD frames with wax foundation. I shook in a few extra bars of bees for good measure. I added the queen from the TBH to the FD super and re-queened the TBH.

 

One question - does the foundation need to be "painted" with wax? I'm interested to see how bees draw comb on plastic foundation without painting with wax.

IMG_0583.jpg.978d339ea0c1fe7c9154039c26be1945.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

.

first of all your frames must be normal standard frames. simple joint system do not stand the shivering of the car.

Like I had. my combs collapsed down and then I had not 10 mm free gap between boxes.

Migration is very productive system. differen places give easily three fold and even five fold yields here.

 

Migrative beekeeping is hard job enough. It needs much frames and boxes to harvest the huge yield which is waiting out there. Top bar frames are impossible to that job.

 

the most important in that you protect your back that you do not injury it when lifting.

it is much more important than save the globe.

 

.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I have started migrating from a TBH to a Langstroth based system for my new hives - persevering with my first hive as a TBH. What I have done is cut plastic foundation to fit the TBH profile and screwed it to the top bar - it allows normal inspections. I have a couple of comb collapses through mis handling. Some may consider this option as an alternative to a building frame around the TBH bars. I think I will do this with all the bars over time.

 

To populate my first Lang hive I took five frames that had the foundations cutout as per the picture and reattached the frame to new top bars at Lang dimensions. Now hanging in the FD box along with four wooden FD frames with wax foundation. I shook in a few extra bars of bees for good measure. I added the queen from the TBH to the FD super and re-queened the TBH.

 

One question - does the foundation need to be "painted" with wax? I'm interested to see how bees draw comb on plastic foundation without painting with wax.

 

Hi Rodger, I am planning on running a Lang hive in spring this year, just to see what it goes like and now I have a bit more confidence handling the 'lil critters' it should be fun. I will make my own boxes and frames. Also planning to do a Warre with full frames as well (5 boxes already made).

I would be interested to know if one needs to coat the plastic foundation as well, I am thinking yes, I wonder if it would be worth poking one into the TBH just to see what happens?

Regards

Daniel

Link to post
Share on other sites

Finman, I think Roger is just talking about switching (migrating) bees into a Langstroth from a topbar style hive, rather than actually getting into migratory beekeeping.

 

Roger, I don't use plastic - have been removing it when foudn in hives we've bought... but if the plastic is new and unweathered they may not be too keen on it. That said, I do know a guy who doesn't wax his plastic and they do use it - whether more slowly than they otherwise might Im not sure. Do make sure you've got your beespace correct though - if they see the opportunity to ignore it because of incorrec spacing they'll probably take it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

They will draw out unwaxed plastic, but it doesn't seem to be as even as ones that have been waxed from what I've seen. It's almost like they start drawing patches of it, once they get started on those patches, they finish those while ignoring the unstarted bits. On the next frame, they might draw out a bit opposite a blank bit, and you end up with patches of deeper cells, and then very shallow or undrawn ones opposite so the whole thing ends up uneven.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Rodger, I am planning on running a Lang hive in spring this year, just to see what it goes like and now I have a bit more confidence handling the 'lil critters' it should be fun. I will make my own boxes and frames. Also planning to do a Warre with full frames as well (5 boxes already made).

I would be interested to know if one needs to coat the plastic foundation as well, I am thinking yes, I wonder if it would be worth poking one into the TBH just to see what happens?

Regards

Daniel

Hi Daniel - I've done just that. Poked them into the TBH hive clean and see how it goes.

 

BTW - the nuc I started with was plastic frames so I had to cut those to fit a TBH. I decided that is the way to go with TBH as I have had too many comb break offs as I mis-handle the bars at inspection time . Cheers

 

It will be as interesting to see how quick the bees draw out the gaps in the Lang hive between the cutouts on the frames I introduced and the sides. I have nested the five cutout frames in the middle of the box with HD wooden frames and wax foundation on either side to keep it all cosy.

 

Roger

Link to post
Share on other sites
.

first of all your frames must be normal standard frames. simple joint system do not stand the shivering of the car.

Like I had. my combs collapsed down and then I had not 10 mm free gap between boxes.

Migration is very productive system. differen places give easily three fold and even five fold yields here.

 

Migrative beekeeping is hard job enough. It needs much frames and boxes to harvest the huge yield which is waiting out there. Top bar frames are impossible to that job.

 

the most important in that you protect your back that you do not injury it when lifting.

it is much more important than save the globe.

 

.

Hey Finman - to clarify I have cut down plastic frames to fit (not plastic foundation) the profile under a top bar in a TBH.

Link to post
Share on other sites
They will draw out unwaxed plastic, but it doesn't seem to be as even as ones that have been waxed from what I've seen. It's almost like they start drawing patches of it, once they get started on those patches, they finish those while ignoring the unstarted bits. On the next frame, they might draw out a bit opposite a blank bit, and you end up with patches of deeper cells, and then very shallow or undrawn ones opposite so the whole thing ends up uneven.

 

Hi Paul - thanks for that. I might paint them with wax after all.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...