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With there being a lot of dicussion on the high risk season for tutin, has anybody had any tutin show up in their test results?

I harvested some honey in mid January in somewhat of a high risk area, test results showed no tutin. I will be extracting some honey harvested in the same area in early february, so will be interesting to see if any tutin shows up from those samples, being a bit later.

 

I know of another beekeeper who harvested some honey in mid January and some tutin showed up in the results, but well under the limit.

 

Any body else like to share their results??

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my landowner, friends and privat and under the radar stuff i take before first of jan.

my commercial honey i harvest mid jan and has been tested zero as in previous years.

i don't think it was a risky year here, north of whitianga. i think the hoppers left the tut very early.

only noticed sap on tut for a short wile. mid jan to end of jan.

but i didn't investigate much. the late flow was good, so bees don't even look at the tut sap, i find.

i'm always wondering about tut nectar. i know everybody says it's no problem, but i don't understand why.

has it ever been tested?

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Took my honey off early January. I'm in a high risk area and had an ex commerical beekeeper telling people my honey would be stuffed. We have also had acticles in the local paper warning people about the risk of tutin poison in honey this year. Got results back today...zero. (y) Pleased I had it tested, just have to pay for it now:eek:

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Everyone saying high tutin year and possibly its traditonally this type of year but honestly from what ive seen the vine hoppers where to late for it to be to much an issue, and most got good crops to dilute these levels down so i'm not sure on all the gossip, but will wait and see how more have done we uasully test positive somewhere every year last year was the first not.

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Tutin levels should be very high in a year like this but they are not, at least not in Hawke's Bay. I don't complain about the cost of testing, I rejoice that nothing has been found. Far better to test 1000 negative samples than to miss one positive.

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I agree John but i still have a few quams with a few things, Firstly i disagree with the cost of testing to me is way to steep and is encouraging cheating, and there is cheating going on, that 1000 samples has just cost you $120k. I think we are fortunate honey prices are good otherwise really would these fees not just tutin but now electronic transfers costs etc be affordable?In my opinion it should be about 1/2 the cost it is.

Then theres the positive results of which i think we have had i think about six drums since standerds came in, thats all fine its good they detected and i'm glad we can it takes the unkown out but the dramea around dealing with it.

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Yes, we must be careful and must have our honey tested but it is not something to be afraid of.

 

 

I disagree Martin. I made myself ill last year eating honey out of a brood nest taken in March. I am now VERY careful.

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I disagree Martin. I made myself ill last year eating honey out of a brood nest taken in March. I am now VERY careful.

Can I ask why the heck you would even do such a thing in march. As a safety precaution ourselves and staff know there is no tasting honey in the comb on the field after 1 Jan ( and I love it on the field when working) if we taste in the shed after 1 Jan it is from a mixed vat. I was told by another beek dont taste comb after 1 Jan, as we are in a higher risk area.

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for me I always taste the honey in the comb no matter what time of year it is... just can't help myself.

 

It's good to be aware of tutin but in my opinion the danger of poisening is pretty low in most areas.

 

Beekeepers have been tasting honey straight from the hive for many years with hardly a problem. More likely to get run over by a bus in Wellington than get sick from tutin poisening.

 

Take that with a grain of salt of course because it's only my opinion :)

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for me I always taste the honey in the comb no matter what time of year it is... just can't help myself. :)

Yep me too, I had a munch on a bit of broken comb the other day (broke off a starter strip due to a bit of rough handling) it was just gorgeous. Having said that I refused to let any one else eat any comb honey.

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Took my honey off early January. I'm in a high risk area and had an ex commerical beekeeper telling people my honey would be stuffed. We have also had acticles in the local paper warning people about the risk of tutin poison in honey this year. Got results back today...zero. (y) Pleased I had it tested, just have to pay for it now:eek:

 

 

Hi Craig, What was the cost of having it tested ?

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Im in west Auckland, and just a little curious as to how much of a problem it really is..A couple of years back my sister told me it was only a problem if you ate the comb..But when extracted and mixed the concentration was to low...

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