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Can you identify Tutu if you see it?  

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  1. 1. Can you identify Tutu if you see it?



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Yeah!! Saw my first tutu plant this evening visiting a friend in the Akatarawa. Thanks to all for this post and pictures and the description. The square stem and berries seal the confirmation. Was expecting a large bunch of berries. Would like to change my vote from "I'm not sure" to "Yes". May ask for a cutting to take to club meeting next month.

Now have to locate a tree tutu.

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Crikey Daley, you are right. Lady at NBA meeting today says councils ARE planting tutu amongst their native plantings, which includes my area. She stressed that we all need to get our honey tested, and it has to be under the tutin threshold for 3 years to be sure we are in a tutu safe area.

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She stressed that we all need to get our honey tested, and it has to be under the tutin threshold for 3 years to be sure we are in a tutu safe area.

 

I don't believe there is much risk if you don't take honey for consumption after about the third week of January. After that It's in the lap of the weather gods. if there's tutu around, its hot & dry without many florals about then you stand a good chance of having your bees gathering nasty stuff.

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Crikey Daley, you are right. Lady at NBA meeting today says councils ARE planting tutu amongst their native plantings, which includes my area. She stressed that we all need to get our honey tested, and it has to be under the tutin threshold for 3 years to be sure we are in a tutu safe area.

They plant it because it is an amazing plant, it can grow almost anywhere, in shallow and very poor soil, and it is nitrogen fixing, it's good for planting on banks to stop erosion, is fast growing and it's native.

It's just unfortunate that we now have passion vine hopper which is what caused the problem.

I personally can't complain about the planting of tutu because I think there are a lot worse things they could plant.

As long as there is awareness it won't be an issue, people just need to be careful.

Gisborne is in a high risk area and there is a lot of tutu around, but I have never heard of it to be an issue from the people I know.

If you have higher levels of tutin your honey is just blended with other honey with lower levels until it is within a safe range, and it's not a big deal. Obviously your better to have none, but it's not the end of the world, and if you get your honey off while there is still plenty of forage you are very unlikely to have problems, the bees only go for the honey dew if they get desperate.

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