Jump to content

Tutu plant identification and tutin


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 41
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

From Coriariaceae (Tutu family) - Faculty of Science - The University of Auckland  

Here is the species of Tutu we have here, southwest of Hamilton. This one is on the road side and they are fairly rare

Yes well, looks like you ARE all right. Himalayan Honeysuckle it is. I was taught at Lincoln by my plant science lecturer that it is tutu, but suspect that 'Tutu' was used loosely to mean poisonous. I

Posted Images

H honeysuckle forms impenetrable thickets of hollow stems, often on riverbeds/margins. I cannot recall ever seeing insects of any sort on the stuff. You can push through it with a snap crackle & pop of green stems. Tutu shrubbery is more likely to rip & tear you. Absolutely no doubt whatsoever re id of your sample.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes well, looks like you ARE all right. Himalayan Honeysuckle it is. I was taught at Lincoln by my plant science lecturer that it is tutu, but suspect that 'Tutu' was used loosely to mean poisonous. It seems just as deadly to cattle as the real thing

 

Just went for a drive to check. Actually, it does have the tulip flowers. Thanks:)

 

YAY we don't have tutu here..............does a silly little dance in glee..............

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
Is that a good or Bad Whew!! or just relief

Relief that I was right it was not Tutu. My wife was also told from her school days that it was tutu and seen quite a few plants around but did not match the photo earlier. Then reading a post of a different species!:eek: Club meeting, experienced commercial beek say they have not found tutin in their honey all these years of testing.!! Conditions needs to be extreme for it to happen.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought all it took was a hot dry summer. Then the f***** passion-vine hoppers suck the sap out of the tutu and deposit honey dew. Then the bees collect the honeydew and you end up with toxic honey. :cry:

Would have thought it would be a reasonably high-risk this year! :eek:

Link to post
Share on other sites
I thought all it took was a hot dry summer. Then the f*&^8 passion-vine hoppers suck the sap out of the tutu and deposit honey dew. Then the bees collect the honeydew and you end up with toxic honey. :cry:

Would have thought it would be a reasonably high-risk this year! :eek:

 

 

It's not apis's most sought after taste, if there're still florals around they'll go for them first.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I thought all it took was a hot dry summer. Then the f***** passion-vine hoppers suck the sap out of the tutu and deposit honey dew. Then the bees collect the honeydew and you end up with toxic honey. :cry:

Would have thought it would be a reasonably high-risk this year! :eek:

Wet windy wellington suburbs dribble of nectar nearly all year round! Normally see a lot of hoppers among the blackberry at the edge of my section. No much yet. Eucalyptus budding again ( did not know it flowers twice).

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...