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Tutu plant identification and tutin


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I have seen picture of the Tutu plant, I have seen the video from Janet on U-tube. I am awaiting to hold a branch in my hand so I know for sure. I was hoping someone from the club will bring in a plant with flowers in one of the meetings. Maybe hope to taste a little to know what the effects are.

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From Coriariaceae (Tutu family) - Faculty of Science - The University of Auckland  

Here is the species of Tutu we have here, southwest of Hamilton. This one is on the road side and they are fairly rare

Yes well, looks like you ARE all right. Himalayan Honeysuckle it is. I was taught at Lincoln by my plant science lecturer that it is tutu, but suspect that 'Tutu' was used loosely to mean poisonous. I

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I have seen picture of the Tutu plant, I have seen the video from Janet on U-tube. I am awaiting to hold a branch in my hand so I know for sure. I was hoping someone from the club will bring in a plant with flowers in one of the meetings. Maybe hope to taste a little to know what the effects are.

I wouldn't taste it, it is highly poisonous. Can kill cattle. We have plenty, shall I post you some?

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Not to me! But, do you think you could get some good photos and post them to a new topic 'Tutin'? Might be a good reference in future.

 

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Yup sure can.

 

I was gunna c if pk wanted me to post some :)

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I wouldn't taste it, it is highly poisonous. Can kill cattle. We have plenty, shall I post you some?

There were post somewhere about testing by ingestion of honey a little at a time. I was thinking that there is a "safe" level and the effect is not permanent. So, if that is the case, then surely a "tiny" collected dew from the plant diluted with a known quantity of (before end of december)honey will give a safe experience and taste if any, so in future, there is a reference point to say,keep these honey for the bees.

If it is that toxic, does it mean that a tourist or "joe public" who do not know, handles the plant as it looks pretty, did not wash hands and eats a sandwich, can keel over? Now, more legislations for tourism??

 

One beek at the club says the council are planting them as they are native. Very confusing when there are other invasive plants being targeted for elimination and the council plants Tutu??:what:

 

If no one brings a plant in the next two months, might take up you offer for my plant identification collection.

 

Hope Grant can shift this as Dave suggest.

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All parts except the flesh of the berries contain tutin, the Maoris used to make juice out of the berries in the early days, and jelly.

I have a book, called a field guide to the native edible plants of New Zealand, it tells of accounts of people drinking the juice and eating the jelly.

But people have tried to eat it before and stuffed it up and died.

I think if you touch it then eat you probably do get sick, or dizzy.

I've always stayed well away from it, my dad taught me what it was when I was very young and I've remembered ever since.

There is a lot of it around here.

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The tutu is there, they just don't have the passion vine hopper problem.

This is the important point that needs to be reiterated. Seems from a quick read over this conversation that people here are perhaps not fully aware of how tutin gets into honey. Tutin is not actually present in nectar from Tutu plants. It gets into honey when bees start collecting the honeydew from passion vine hoppers feeding on the plants.

I have a book, called a field guide to the native edible plants of New Zealand, it tells of accounts of people drinking the juice and eating the jelly.

But people have tried to eat it before and stuffed it up and died.

I think if you touch it then eat you probably do get sick, or dizzy.

I've always stayed well away from it, my dad taught me what it was when I was very young and I've remembered ever since.

There is a lot of it around here.

The berries are also toxic. From the plant conservation network page

Coriaria arborea var. arborea | New Zealand Plant Conservation Network

All parts of all Coriaria species are poisonous except the succulent black, soft fleshy petals surrounding the seeds are poisonous (the seeds themselves are also poisonous). Poisoning is usually through eating the seeds, berries or poisonous honey.

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The site from the link is out of date. The last poisoning with tutin was only few years ago from comb honey produced by a novice beekeeper from Coromandel Pen(it was in the radio in 2008 or 2009 or so).

 

Years ago when I started beekeeping I played with the idea to specialize myself on comb honey but after I informed myself more and more I stepped back. You must know what you are doing when is about comb honey or you risk to harm somebody's life than you can live with that for the rest of your life.

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I remember droving a mob of cattle out from a coastal sheep station years ago. One animal was alowed to browse on TuTu. Dead in about 30 mins. NOT easy to explain to the boss!!! And we all knew about Tutu. Another plant which is very toxic is Oeleanar. Even using the wood for a BBQ can have harmfull effects. This is another one Councils like to plant around.

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And Castor Oil Plant used to be a popular ornamental plant that still lingers in many gardens.

This produces highly toxic ricin, which is a hazard for children and stock, but as far as I know it does not produce toxic honey at all.

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Tutin poisoning from honey dew is extremely serious and sometimes fatal. I believe most people fully recover but apparently some that have been badly poisoned can suffer serious ongoing problem for many years. Hot dry conditions plus passion vine hoppers and little or no honey flow create the perfect conditions. Exactly the conditions present over a lot of the North Island at the moment.

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Went through to the Tarawera Outlet over Aucland anniversary weekend and saw quite a number of bee hives in among the pines. There was almost as much tutu as pines. They were stacked up and not many boxes high so possibly about to be removed but still a concern

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Went through to the Tarawera Outlet over Aucland anniversary weekend and saw quite a number of bee hives in among the pines. There was almost as much tutu as pines. They were stacked up and not many boxes high so possibly about to be removed but still a concern

I think they are Arataki rotorua hives

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