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How do you re-use small amounts of wax?


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Thanks Trevor,

wee problem that I am two left handed girl...no way I am into bulding...;).

would bee re-use it if I put into top feeders? or does it become a nuisance for them to clean up?Selling/swapping sounds good. Would any beekeepers swap the wax for box/frames/floor? etc . The wax is from AFB free hives.

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No real building required.

I used a Chrisco's polystyrene box. They have a good sealed lid. Cut a hole in the lid with a craft knife and then got a piece of glass cut (I cut my own) a siliconed the glass to the lid on the outside.

I made a little stand for the inside (no real building required, rough and ready) so that my tray would sit above an ice cream container.

I made myself (but you could go to a local sheet metal worker and ask for a piece of flat iron cut to the size of the box and get them to put a longitudinal crease (fold) in the iron so the wax will move to the centre.

Take the box with you so they can measure it. I would be surprised if they charged $10.00 for it.

 

Melt wax to your hearts content.

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Hi Guys,

I have collected small amounts of wax (with soma honey on it) after extracting (spoon method:)) from the frames.

At this stage the lot is frozen and waiting ...thats around 1-2 kg

ANy suggestions?

Wash it with water that gets the honey off, silicon cooking moulds are great for putting the wax in, you can melt it on a stove top - I do but it requires constant monitoring as it is flammable, or an old frypan. Pour into mould when it sets you will find all / most crud has formed on the bottom just scrap it of its easier if it is still warm and soft.

My latest efforts from recent scratched cappings.

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I put all the cappings etc in a glass bowl in the microwave and heat gently until all the wax has melted and floated to the top. Then let it cool till it sets solid, lift the wax off and pour out the 'runny honey' underneath to use for sweetening my tea. Then reheat the wax until melted again and pour it through a sieve into a stainless steel bowl. Once it has set you can usually get it out by pouring a bit of cold water into the bowl and waiting for it to seep down into the bottom of the bowl, when the wax should pop up and float. This gives you a fairly clean block of wax you can use for all those things Trevor said, or get a credit for it next time you buy something from your bee supply shop. Some will 'buy' it off you to make foundation with.

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I peg a square of old T shirt to an ice cream container, heat the wax and everything else in an old stainless steel pot and strain. It was hot enough the other day I sat the pot in the sun on a dark surface with a piece of glass on top and it melted nicely.

 

My daughter uses the some of the wax in a couple of moisturising creams she makes

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I put all the cappings etc in a glass bowl in the microwave and heat gently

Once upon a time I was a microwave engineer, and on occasion had to diagnose fires started by microwave ovens to see who was at fault (insurance-wise). I do worry about the number of people heating beeswax in microwaves. I hope you're being very, very, careful.

 

It wouldn't be my choice. A double boiler, on an electric heat source, preferably in an open space, is the safe way.

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Hi,

 

We learnt this method at the Franklin Bee Club, it works very well.

 

You basically boil the wax with water and leave overnight, then every night you scrape off the bottom black layer. You repeat until you have a clean block.

 

Photos and full post at Minding your own Beeswax

 

Best to do outside after the bees have gone to sleep, or you will get lots of winged visitors.

 

Don't over boil it either as wax can ignite.

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A good way of potentially spreading disease or inciting robbing

Far enough away from the hive (50 meters) robbing never been a problem. What disease? I know my hives are AFB free and I dont think varroa hang around on honey comb/cappings....

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Far enough away from the hive (50 meters) robbing never been a problem. What disease? I know my hives are AFB free and I dont think varroa hang around on honey comb/cappings....

 

Fair enough. There are more diseases that afb, Varroa is not a problem. last time I checked bees can fly further than 50m, but that distance may be what stops robbing ?????

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Yeah unless you've got it right under their noses or there is a dearth on I think you are pretty safe leaving stuff out for them to clean up. They do scrap when I do it and there are usually a few dead bees around afterwards but never any violence back at the hives. What other diseases were you thinking of? I know the source is clean so fail to see the problem? There is probably a chance someone elses bees will find it but given the close proximity Im sure my girls get the lions share....

 

Just reading wiki about slumgum and apparently it makes a good swarm lure... Didn't know that!

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