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Anyone interested in a Dunedin-based varroa monitoring workshop?


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I'd be very interested in running a (small) workshop for Varroa monitoring. The idea being that it would be a hands on, practical workshop. I am very much a beginner learning the ropes so the idea would be to try a few different methods and get input from everyone attending as to what they are doing/are intending to do.

I would be happy to host it - maybe late January or early February after honey is off the hives and just before treatments would be going in again. Should be mites around to monitor then.

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Otto, the first Saturday in Feb is the bee club meeting. I wonder if the two could be combined.

Yes, possibly. How many people would be likely to attend this if it were a club meeting?

 

I'm not all that comfortable hosting dozens of people and haven't got enough space around my home apiary for that anyway. I guess we could use club hive/s (although I'd be more comfortable using my own nice, gentle bees). Are club hive/s on mesh floors?

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Not a Dunedinite so wouldn't know, but " late January or early February after honey is off the hives"?

 

When does your flow end in Dunedin? I thought end of March or sometime April would have been more appropriate?

More a personal hive management statement on what I do with my hives than anything else. Only been keeping bees here for a few years and don't really know what others do. I intend to have honey off by early Feb to give me plenty of time to sort out mites before the bees winter down.

 

In my limited experience the main honeyflow where my hives are is December-January. I got some earlier honey for the first time this year (this is the first season where I haven't needed to make splits from all my hives for work). I had a number of hives that had shut down (no brood at all) in March last year. Of course we had a glorious April and they all got going again... I've found that it is hard to get much of a surplus after January as the coastal weather is so hit and miss.

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The idea is to be applauded.

I wish you all the luck.

I am taking the liberty to give you a part of the simple ways against varroa mites.

If you can close the hive (almost hermetically) a few minutes to get the temperature 37-38 degrees Celsius inside.

When it reaches the temperature and edit this,hive go back to normal, open it.

Immediately remove the floor, you can expect what you see, ...

Do not wait, right into the water because the varroa mites alive.

But that's only part of the procedure is sufficient for 20% of varroa mites (in one attempt)

 

 

If I had the chance to join you in NZ ... lol???

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The idea is to be applauded.

If you can close the hive (almost hermetically) a few minutes to get the temperature 37-38 degrees Celsius inside.

When it reaches the temperature and edit this,hive go back to normal, open it.

Immediately remove the floor, you can expect what you see, ...

I am not really set up to play around with temperature in hives at the moment. I was thinking the initial ones to cover would be sugar shaking, alcohol wash, accelerated mite drop using icing sugar and natural mite fall.

I think it critical to monitor so that you have some idea of what is going on in your beehives. At the same time I'd have to admit that part of the reason I want to run such a workshop is selfish. More local beekeepers monitoring and treating their hives properly will hopefully mean slightly less invasion pressure on my hives!

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Several items from the research related to the temperature, it may help.

The largest number of parasites (varroa mites) is on the young bees and drones, comparatively few of them happens to hikers who exits and entrances to the hive. Varroa females in spring are sensitive to the influence of external factors. At that time in the bee community is winter (survived) population, which prolongs their lives parasitically on adult bees.

Summer varroa generation is very flexible regime of temperature and humidity. - Female varroa mites can live up to 9 days at a temperature of 28 º C and a relative humidity of 85%;

- Up to 3 days at a temperature of 35 ºC and 50% relative humidity, but the mortality during the first day at

35 º C and humidity 10-20%

- Some females can survive on the frame from which it came out of a litter, up to 18 days, and capped brood at a temperature of 20 º C and up to 30 days. - In the empty hives without honeycomb in summer varroa females live 7 days - The light honeycomb 6-7 days; - The comb with open brood to 15 days; - The body of dead bees, drones and pupae to 11 days; - The bread crumbs and bee wax to 9 days; - At low temperatures of -10 to-30 º C live 48 to 72 hours;

- At a temperature 17 º C varroa females are immobile, and at 19 to 27 degrees Celsius they shifted the zone of elevated temperature

- 34 to 41 º C is moving in the lower temperature zone;

- Temperature of 42 to 44 º C forces varroa females in chaotic motion;

- When exposed to sunlight they tend to move to places darkened; - On honey flowers for direct sunlight varroa females die during 1.5 hours. - Some of them survive to 5 days, and during that time they are able to attach to the bee.

This included data on how temperature affects the varroa mites

In addition to physical attacks on varroa with temperature, there are three types of physical attacks against varroa mites.

Light, sound, pressure, (what bothers Varroa) except this,...

There are three components in addition to these attacks on the body varroa, ....

rodeo, wind, (changing the acidity of air)

One by one, but if at the same time it is hit (hit the moon)

may be unclear but I made ​​an effort to translate

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Should we get it a mention in the paper? That might attract more attention than you want, but it could flush out a lot of beekeepers around your way that are not in the usual loop.

How about we start with an email to the Dunedin Beekeeping Club membership? Gauge how much interest and then decide on the best option for when and where?

I draft an email to send out.

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Several items from the research related to the temperature, it may help.

In addition to physical attacks on varroa with temperature, there are three types of physical attacks against varroa mites.

Light, sound, pressure, (what bothers Varroa) except this,...

There are three components in addition to these attacks on the body varroa, ....

rodeo, wind, (changing the acidity of air)

One by one, but if at the same time it is hit (hit the moon)

 

may be unclear but I made ​​an effort to translate

Thanks for the information Spomenko. I think there is some information being lost/misplaced in translation. Could you send me some references of the scientific papers that this information is in (if in English)? I work at a university and have access to many papers and E-journals.

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