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January 2021 Apiary Diary


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1 hour ago, Alastair said:

I would still prefer the NZ model to the American one.

Yes.  Also the European or Australian model.

 

We are very fortunate that we were able to shut down a couple of little islands in the South Pacific.

 

 

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2 hours ago, tristan said:

just unfortunate that we actually needed to.

its ironic that our underfunded, under resourced and poorly managed early covid response actually resulted in the best course of action.

absolutely brilliant piece of govt BS to call it "fast and early" when it was "slow and late" which forced us into lockdown.

had we tried to do it like Australia has done, we would have ended up like everyone else. fortunately our systems where so crap that it completely failed and we had to resort to the lockdown, which was the best move.

@tristanfor PM ! 

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Just remember how AFB, varoa and bovine TB illustrate the power of economics over common sense. How the desire(s) of an individual(s) can ruin the rights of many. 
 

Many households are suffering post covid, and many more are to come,

while the world wafts along a pendulum of fortune between health & economics. 

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But I’m happy. Tidying up my gear on warm Canterbury afternoon in my shed.

 

 My one remaining hive is going well & I’ve met someone new in the ChCh bee community who’s helping me restore the blunders of 2019/2020. 
 

I’m looking forward to 2021

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Can some please explain where MPI are getting their figures from ...quoting an export price for multiflora honey at $20/kg.

Is that multiflora manuka .... and are they not hrave enough to quote clover export prices....

just curious.

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3 hours ago, jamesc said:

Can some please explain where MPI are getting their figures from ...quoting an export price for multiflora honey at $20/kg.

Is that multiflora manuka .... and are they not hrave enough to quote clover export prices....

just curious.

Page 10 apiculture report 2019 ?

customs export declarations 

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14 hours ago, jamesc said:

Can some please explain where MPI are getting their figures from ...quoting an export price for multiflora honey at $20/kg.

Is that multiflora manuka .... and are they not hrave enough to quote clover export prices....

just curious.

 

Interesting. This, from the Advocate -

 

"Released in December, the report detailed an increase in export volume in 2020, but a reduction in the per-kg price commanded. Since February export volumes are well above the five-year average and this is expected to continue in the next six months, leading to a predicted total value of $470million for the year ending June 2021. That would be a 10.7 percent increase on the $425million of honey sent offshore in the previous reporting year"

 

So off my head I'm not sure how many commercial beekeepers are in NZ but is it something around 700?

 

Let's say it's 700, if we divide that into the $470 million, we come out with $671,428.00 dollars per beekeper.

 

Sound about right?
 

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12 minutes ago, Alastair said:

So off my head I'm not sure how many commercial beekeepers are in NZ but is it something around 700?

 

Let's say it's 700, if we divide that into the $470 million, we come out with $671,428.00 dollars per beekeper.

 

Sound about right?
 

i think the amount of commercial beeks is a lot less, but keep in mind its not actually beeks, its companies.

$600k income would be only a small commercial outfits.

trouble is i think the sources for that information is not exactly reliable, so it really only gives trends rather than factual data.

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4 hours ago, Dennis Crowley said:

About 1200 with 50+ hives

you do not call a beek with 51 or even 100 hives a commercial beek, they are all part timers. under 200 is a semi commercial.

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Surely the total value of 470 big ones would be made up mostly of buyers export declarations more so than what goes into beekeepers pockets.. most guys I know sell to buyers who then either add value and export or add a zero and export .. that  big wheels got lots of small cogs turning it. 
 

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There are two recently arrived hives in a paddock across the road from my favourite apiary. A week ago they had been knocked over by stock, and sorted by a guy working on that farm who didn't have the beekeeper's contact number (or a beesuit) - he checked in to see if they were mine after he'd stacked them back up. 

 

Today a stack of empties in my apiary had new bees in it, spotted a nicely marked queen. Made me think, yet again, that I should mark my queens. Guess extra bees is an upside of nearby hives. Downside is that someone who has two hives, and one of them swarming this time of year isn't a great sign

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I imagine you can buy honey and then send it overseas without owning a single hive if you register yourself and have all the paperwork. So dividing export sales by beekeepers is nonsense.

Without a single hive you might buy it off a beekeeper for $3/kg and then export it for $20/kg.

The costs of freight and distribution would be fairly substantial. Getting it from a drum in NZ to a jar on a shelf in the UK isn't trivial, some people put a lot of effort into it. 

If you can buy for $3 and sell for $20 there needs to be some profit left over. The question I guess is how much profit is there and is it reasonable? 

If buyers and packers are making huge profits I have no idea.

Anyone sitting on a mountain of honey is more than welcome start exporting it for $20.

But there is no point complaining about statistical reports of customs declarations.

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