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Honey B Healthy ???


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Did the products come in Stu?

Hi All,

The HBH and ABB are in my hands, however I am still waiting on the MAF approval which they tell me is about two weeks away. I only have samples volumes at this stage so not a huge amount but enough for a trial for about 50 beekeepers. For this period I will be offering both the products at the same rate of $45 inc GST per bottle. The bottles come in 480ml and you use about 10mm of Amino boost with each litre of sugar, so enough for approx 500 litres of sugar which is about $0.09 per litre. The Honey B Healthy is also in a 480ml bottle and will do about 96 feedings/doses. This equates to $0.47 per feed. DO NOT FEED DURING HONEY FLOW and DO NOT ADD HEALTH PRODUCTS TO HOT SUGAR SYRUP. Let me know if you are keen and I will get the gear ready to post out.

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Hi Jose,

My phone number is 021 526 555 and email info@hivedoctor.com. If you can send all your details to my email then I can put you into my system, remember to include a phone number for the courier please. I may not be very contactable on the phone as I am getting my honey in and in remote locations....not trying to avoid people.

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Hi Stu.

What's on the ingredients list of HBH, please?

 

Hi Pbee, Struggling to get an image of the label to appear so the best I can do is point you to the web site http://honeybhealthy.com/gallon.pdf. I do not have access to all the chemicals in the products as there is intellectual property surrounding this, however MAF and NZFSA do have full disclosure of all the chemicals from the supplier and they are checking if there is anything we should be concerned about. I think the biggest key to using these products is that they are not used close to honey flows, however this is probably common sense. As these products have been used around the world for years I would be surprised in MAF or NZFSA came up with something that the rest of the world missed...however we are unique!

 

I will be getting my website up and running soon at which point all of this information will be available. Sorry I could not be more helpful.

 

FYI. I noted that on a blog that people were spraying HBH with syrup on new plastic frames to make the bees accept them quicker? This I will be doing as the new plastic frames are hopeless until they are worked by the bees.

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Hi Pbee, Struggling to get an image of the label to appear so the best I can do is point you to the web site http://honeybhealthy.com/gallon.pdf. I do not have access to all the chemicals in the products as there is intellectual property surrounding this, however MAF and NZFSA do have full disclosure of all the chemicals from the supplier and they are checking if there is anything we should be concerned about. I think the biggest key to using these products is that they are not used close to honey flows, however this is probably common sense. As these products have been used around the world for years I would be surprised in MAF or NZFSA came up with something that the rest of the world missed...however we are unique!

 

I will be getting my website up and running soon at which point all of this information will be available. Sorry I could not be more helpful.

 

FYI. I noted that on a blog that people were spraying HBH with syrup on new plastic frames to make the bees accept them quicker? This I will be doing as the new plastic frames are hopeless until they are worked by the bees.

Hi Stu,

thanks for the pdf.

In reading the ingredients list for HBH I find Sodium lauryl sulfate.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_lauryl_sulfate

Will it just irritate the bees or is it toxic?

And why is there a WARNING after the ingredients?

KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN...and

IF ACCIDENTALLY INGESTED SEEK MEDICAL HELP.

If it were a 'natural' product it wouldn't need such warnings.

 

IF IT AIN'T GOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION - I wont give it to my bees.

 

Stu - I like your Nucs - but you can count me out on this one.

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If it were a 'natural' product it wouldn't need such warnings.

 

Botulism is natural. Arsenic is natural. Essential oils are natural and many very toxic if swallowed. I'm not commenting either for or against HBH, but in this case you're off base, PBee.

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Have been reading the overseas blogs Pbee? I would be cautious about these as you have no idea of peoples education or motivation....Lets face it we unwittingly expose the bees to a heap of un-natural things but as it is normal practice we do it without much thought...for instance paint boxes, use treated timber (Arsenic) pallets and bottom boards, Bayvarol, Apivar, thymol, plastic frames, hardwood (formaldehyde based) top lids for hives etc etc. We cannot all be specialists or scientists hence we need to draw our experience from the best sources possible and not read into blogs too much...assuming this is where you gained your knowledge? I would recommend having a look around the research and results that Randy Oliver http://scientificbeekeeping.com/fighting-varroa-biotechnical-tactics-ii/ has carried out. He is a straight up and down scientist type character and was here in Auckland presenting research and findings. The results from Randy's work are that HBH had a huge beneficial effect on bees suffering from nosema. See independent info below.

USDA Nosema Ceranae (2).pdf

USDA Nosema.pdf

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Have been reading the overseas blogs Pbee? I would be cautious about these as you have no idea of peoples education or motivation....Lets face it we unwittingly expose the bees to a heap of un-natural things but as it is normal practice we do it without much thought...for instance paint boxes, use treated timber (Arsenic) pallets and bottom boards, Bayvarol, Apivar, thymol, plastic frames, hardwood (formaldehyde based) top lids for hives etc etc. We cannot all be specialists or scientists hence we need to draw our experience from the best sources possible and not read into blogs too much...assuming this is where you gained your knowledge? I would recommend having a look around the research and results that Randy Oliver http://scientificbeekeeping.com/fighting-varroa-biotechnical-tactics-ii/ has carried out. He is a straight up and down scientist type character and was here in Auckland presenting research and findings. The results from Randy's work are that HBH had a huge beneficial effect on bees suffering from nosema. See independent info below.

Nope, didn't think of reading overseas blogs, but thats a good idea, thanks. Just read what I posted and SLS is a detergent, according to Wiki, hence my concern. You know I build all my own gear from untreated timber. Pine, Rimu Totara and Cedar. Frames are made of untreated pine or Cedar. Boxes are painted with raw linseed oil and tung oil extract as hardener. Thinner is organic as well. My cabinet making mentor has taught me all the tricks of not using chemicals. Yes I have used Apistan in desperation. Once! And I am using Apivar at present as Varroa are munting the wings of newly hatched queens. I personally don't take antibiotics, but I had a bout of pneumonia in 2004 and I asked my Dr for antibiotics as I couldn't shake it off myself.

I think I told you my bees are kept on an organic farm and I am as organic as they come. Autumn treatment for Varroa will be Thymol. Haven't found Nosema in my hives either. And I pray to God I never will. I think HBH is a brilliant idea, apart from it containing SLS. But Paul Jenkin posted the recipe on the previous page and I will make up a couple of drums using lecithin as emulsifier. I have personally ingested Spearmint oil and I will try Lemongrass oil too. Don't be offended when I say HBH is not for me. I have no trouble you selling it and other people using it! I think it is brilliant. I go shopping in the organic shop and others go to the supermarket. I choose what ever is best for me. That's all.

Good on ya for bringing it in!

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Cheers Pbee,

I like your effort at being Bee Minded and going as natural as possible. The overseas blogs go on about the same issue you have raised and I will do my best to find out why it is used.

 

On a separate issue I have been pondering John Berry's question as to why do we suddenly need additives etc to keep bees healthy now?

 

I can only assume that there are three or four plus factors at play:

1. We didn't have varroa 10 years ago so the bee's immune systems were not having to fight as much - Randy showed a picture of a tennis/golf ball size wound on a human to explain the type of wound a bee must live with once bitten by varroa and the fact a bee's immune system is under much more pressure to remain healthy.

2. Intensive farming and bee keeping is putting pressure on multi factorial sources of pollen for bees to build up on? I know I am slowly finding that bee keepers are crowding good wintering areas around more so than I have ever seen before...saying this the bees didn't touch either the Miro bee feed or Feed bee this year but built up nicely so who knows?

3. There used to be gorse everywhere and I am led to believe that gorse is a great source of pollen with many of the amino building blocks bees require (I have also heard that there are better sources too). Gorse has pretty much disappeared in many areas as the secondary growth recovers.

4. We are generally...(thinking Manuka here) putting more hives in smaller areas over the greatest demand period for the bees

 

Just my thoughts but it is a hot topic and one that will probably not disappear in a hurry.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi All,

I have received NZFSA approval to sell the products and they have no issues with any of the compounds found. I will get the gear up on my website soon. I only have 480ml bottles for sale at the moment but will get larger volumes in as required.

 

Cheers Stu

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Hi Stu,

thanks for the pdf.

In reading the ingredients list for HBH I find Sodium lauryl sulfate.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_lauryl_sulfate

Will it just irritate the bees or is it toxic?

And why is there a WARNING after the ingredients?

KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN...and

IF ACCIDENTALLY INGESTED SEEK MEDICAL HELP.

If it were a 'natural' product it wouldn't need such warnings.

 

IF IT AIN'T GOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION - I wont give it to my bees.

 

Stu - I like your Nucs - but you can count me out on this one.

 

Hi All this is the response from Honey B Healthy regarding SLS....

Hi Stu.

Sorry for the delay in response regarding the blog that you sent a couple of weeks ago.

All of the HBH products' ingredients are certified and manufactured in an FDA-licensed food establishment under strict cGMP guidelines. The batch sizes are several tons each, and each and every batch is tested on live hives before being released. As for SLS, it is used at a very low level i) as a processing aid and ii) to enhance product stability. HBH customers are happy with the product the way it is as it works! The package and label is very conservatively mainly because it is a concentrated emulsion of essential oils and we want to guard against accidental ingestion--which we have not had any reports of since introducing the product to market about 12 years ago.

Hope this is helpful.

Thanks and best regards.

Harry.

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  • 9 months later...

Have just landed a large amount of Honey B Healthy (HBH) and Amino B Boost (ABB) which you can now purchase in 3.78 liter containers for half the cost $/liter of the smaller containers. Why am I so convinced that it was worth the investment in getting it over?

 

The first reason is that Nelson Honey began using it near the end of winter to ensure early build up. They were very impressed with the result and as Phil says "it put a real shine on the bees". He used combinations the HBH with ABB in patties and noticed brood production increase very soon after the application. To test the effectiveness of what he saw he went back to his old mixture, without HBH or ABB, and did not see the same results hence he added it back in and the results were again positive. This was enough for me to be convinced that the amount of positive feedback from overseas was justified and this was a positive product to offer our market.

 

Currently I am putting the HBH and ABB treatment through it's paces as I have a few scenarios that I want to see a result...quickly!

My first scenario is that I have about 200 overwintered nucs that I want to boost up to full sized hives by Mid November for manuka. All was going well with them when I doubled them up but since then the weather has been average and the hives have stagnated. They have now had one 2 liter sugar syrup feed with ABB & HDB and I will give them another in a weeks time. I am not worried about the C4 issue as the hives are barely storing any residual stores as they are growing so quickly.

 

My second scenario is that I was a week late feeding about 100 double hives and as a result the super star hives that had piles of brood died and others now stressed with lack of food. I have given these hives about 3 liters of very runny sugar syrup with ABB and HBH and will do so again next week. Will report on the results is 2 weeks time and again at the end of the honey flow. Again not stressed about C4 as there are almost no honey stores.

 

My third scenario is feeding the remaining hives that were all ok but needed a slight boost. These are the ones I am most worried about using HBH and ABB on as I fear they could over react and swarm. To mitigate C4 issues I will remove 2 frames of stored honey into the nucs as explained below.

 

I will take a frame of partially uncapped brood off a hives, with bees, just prior to the honey flow and see if they manage to keep the hive going and if I can get a strong hive out of it by winter? By rights I should be using a capped frame to make the nuc up but I want to see if the nutrients in the HBH and ABB are good enough for a limited number of nurse bees to bring a small hive through into winter. My rational for using a frame of uncapped cells is that these bees will not assist during the honey flow so utilize them in a more proactive manor.

 

COSTS...

Recommended dose of 5 ml of HBH and 5ml of ABB per liter means you get 756 liters of syrup treated for $0.46 cents per liter or $0.23 if you are just using one of the additives. Hence if you are using up to 3 liters per feed then $1.38 per feed for a complete stimulant solution which is cost competitive. If you are adding it to pollen patties then it will stretch even further.

 

Will post an update when I see the results.

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  • 3 weeks later...
It would be good to hear feed backs from others also who have used HBH. I guess a few people in NZ would have tried it this season. Please share the experience............

Hi JoSe,

Good to hear from you. The biggest users to date are Phil from Nelson Honey and John Whitehead (was on the TV after he had his hives Killed). Plus I have been using it but cannot comment as I received it too late in the season to really give good feedback. Phil from Nelson Honey tried using it with and without his standard beehive paddy formula and swears it made a big difference to his bees plus the Amino Boost started his queen laying in the middle of winter!

I have bulk packs of both now so should be able to make more objective comments once we head into pollen shortage periods.

 

What I have seen is the areas surrounding the brood with the sugar syrup in and no pollen...telling me the bees are getting all they need from the HBH and Amino B Boost in a sugar syrup mix.

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It would be good to hear feed backs from others also who have used HBH. I guess a few people in NZ would have tried it this season. Please share the experience............

Hi Jose,

I think you will struggle to get much feedback as a few commercial guys pretty much brought all my stock and I ended up air freighting some in for one of the commercial guys so your probably better to look at other forums such as Honey Bee Healthy ? Yea, Nay or "Meh"? and Essential oils and honey bee health « Honey Bee Suite

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