Jump to content

Black Queen cell virus


Wildflower
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 4
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

3 hours ago, Wildflower said:

Cliff hanger......

 

I guess that means you are asking what it is?

 

Easiest way for a small beekeeper to discover it is if you are squishing queen cells in a hive preparing to swarm, and you find the odd one that instead of a normal healthy larva, has a dead mushy larva, only just pre pupal and in a capped cell, it is white but has black streaks in it.

 

It might be positioned central brood nest where temperature was good, the cell was well built and the larva well fed. No reason for it to die. Other than disease.

 

BQCV is the reason why commercial queen breeders will often candle queen cells before putting them in a mating nuc.

  • Good Info 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 20/12/2020 at 1:19 AM, JohnF said:

 

Yep - and Nosema ceranae is transmitted at higher levels than Nosema apis. When we see dwindling hives, we also see higher levels of ceranae than apis also

 

I was at a very interesting presentation on Nosema Ceranae at a provincial association agm a couple years ago.  A very interesting comment from the presenter around Ceranae becoming prolific in our part of the world.  Ceranae is apparently closely related to the type normally found in wasps, and there was some belief that wasps attacking a colony of bees will vector Ceranae into the hives.

 

This was particularly fascinating to many of us, Apis has long been a springtime thing in our wet spring climate, but we rarely saw Ceranae.  But what we do suffer is endless onslaught of wasps in August and September.  The other tidbit he mentioned, Apis thrives in a moist environment, Ceranae moreso in a dry environment, and he had some reason to believe the real reason a lot of us saw little Ceranae in the hives is simply because we all check in the spring, but not late in the season when it's dry.  A combination of the dry part of the year and an endless onslaught of wasps is apparently a recipe for 'lots of Ceranae in the hives', and that year was particularly bad for wasps.  Turns out, it was also particularly bad for winter survival in the same areas that had been complaining of wasps.

 

Using my own example, my bees out in the fireweed patch were inundated with attacks from ground wasps that year.  So much so, it was impossible to walk from the electric fence to the hives without stepping on them, and it was only 3 steps.  it was like a carpet of wasps on the ground.  Exact same spot 2 years later, not a wasp to be seen thru all of August.

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 22/12/2020 at 11:44 AM, Alastair said:

 

I guess that means you are asking what it is?

 

Easiest way for a small beekeeper to discover it is if you are squishing queen cells in a hive preparing to swarm, and you find the odd one that instead of a normal healthy larva, has a dead mushy larva, only just pre pupal and in a capped cell, it is white but has black streaks in it.

 

It might be positioned central brood nest where temperature was good, the cell was well built and the larva well fed. No reason for it to die. Other than disease.

 

BQCV is the reason why commercial queen breeders will often candle queen cells before putting them in a mating nuc.

Found a few of those but I always assumed it was because the new queen in the hive had stung and killed the developing pupa.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's some info on the NZ situation-

 

"Black queen cell virus is found in all New Zealand apiaries in the Bee Pathogen Programme. Because our tests are so sensitive, virus can be present without any clinical signs of disease. Clinical (observable) signs are the queen dying and turning yellow after capping, which can be confused with half-moon syndrome. With BQCV, the queen larvae eventually turn black, sometimes leaving a black spot on the outside of the cell. Bees affected by chronic bee paralysis virus. To reduce the damage this virus can do, keep bees well fed and clean grafting tools between uses with flame or ethanol. In further data analyses we will be looking at the association between the viral concentrations of BQCV and other variables we have collected".

 

https://www.mpi.govt.nz/dmsdocument/29348/direct

Edited by Alastair
  • Good Info 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 Share


×
×
  • Create New...