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Extracting honey for Donation


Tim Goddard
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Hi all,

 

I made some calls about donating my honey from last year's harvest to charity (a food bank), but ran in to (reasonable) issues since it was extracted in my home kitchen. All Tutin tested, etc, but not following an approved process. As a result, anything I get this flow will be surplus to requirements.

 

Is there any feasible way around Wellington to extract a small number of boxes (I have 3 hives only), in a way which meets food safety standards for donation? Can someone, or does someone run a scheme where they extract, test and donate honey?

 

Kind regards,

 

Tim

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It's my understanding that you can take your equipment that you use in your kitchen into an approved kitchen - community hall or school and meet food standards that way. However I'm sure someone will correct me if things have changed sufficiently to prevent that,

 

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From what I can find, you must meet requirements under the Food Act 2014 if you extract or pack bee products that are intended for

sale only in New Zealand, or export to countries that do not require official assurances (export certificates).

 

WWW.MPI.GOVT.NZ

<p>The Food Act 2014 takes a common-sense approach to food safety. If you make or sell food, your business may need to be registered. Find out more about the Food Act and what it means for you.</p>

 

Food safety rules

If you wish to sell honey in New Zealand, you need to meet the requirements of the 2014 Food Act (exporting is a bit more complicated). The Act sets guidelines around processing, handling and storage, to make sure your products are safe to eat.

 

Unless you set your own Food Safety Programme and get an exemption for your business, you will need to process your honey in approved premises – usually a commercial kitchen or plant.

 

You also need to meet labelling and tutin testing regulations.

 

 

 

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You don't have to register under the (food) Act if you're selling food:

to raise funds for a charity, cultural, or community group less than 20 times a year

provided by members of sports clubs, social clubs, or marae – where food is not the purpose of the event

once in a calendar year at an event such as a local fair.

However, you will have to register under the Act if you're:

fundraising more than 20 times a year

catering events at clubs, or selling food at club bars or restaurants

bartering or exchanging food commercially

selling food commercially at fairs, markets, or community events more than once a year.

https://www.mpi.govt.nz/food-business/exemptions-food-act-requirements/fundraising-social-community-event-food-act-requirements/

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On 7/12/2020 at 4:31 PM, Bighands said:

Grant, As far as I understand the rules it has to be a stand alone enterprise and needs traceability in case someone gets ill.I heard of a guy who worked in a hotel, extracted his honey in the kitchen and was pulled up when he sold his honey at a market.

Was that the man across the tracks from you ... @Bighands ..?

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firstly, respect for your intent, a lot!

secondly, i've been involved in extracting and jarring up a bit of honey for donation to a foodbank. Dropping it off felt all kinds of amazing.

thirdly, there might be an option in wellington. Common unity project based in epuni do some honey sales, i've had some involvement with them. I'll follow up with them and reply here, but it won't be until next week - sorry, life etc. Alternatively, you could touch base with them directly yourself - tell them dave h suggested it if you want, in which case any awkwardness would fall on me. Flick me a message if you want, happy to chat

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