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"Abandoned or neglected"...


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Up until about 1950, NZ beekeepers continued to try out 'remedies' for AFB...

 

The methods almost always involved shaking hives off the frames, sometimes multiple times, to try to use up the last of their stores.  Equipment was variously scorched, boiled and disinfected, using the methods and beliefs that were common.

 

It wasn't until about 1950 that (1) 'shook swarming', shaking bees off the combs to treat for AFB and (2) a serious attempt to reduce the risk created by abandoned or neglected apiaries.  Even with the calls by the industry at the time, the Dept of Agriculture was loathe to move too much in that direction, probably expecting a serious backlash should they make a mistake.

 

Now?  I'm guessing there would be a massively more complex process needed to get rid of 'abandoned or neglected' apiaries...  But it still should be happening...

 

Here is an unambiguous request by the industry in 1953, by way of a remit to the NBA conference of that year.

 

 

neglected.png

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Up until about 1950, NZ beekeepers continued to try out 'remedies' for AFB...   The methods almost always involved shaking hives off the frames, sometimes multiple times, to try to use up th

Obviously teenagers excluded.

There is one part of me that doesn't much care who the bkpr is.  If the colonies are within the realm of 'abandoned or neglected' (however that would need to be objectively defined...) I would be plea

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Unregistered apiarys get a notice under the lid and after 30 days they  can be destroyed. Unfortunately if the site is registered but all the hives are dead or there is gear lying around everywhere there is not a lot that can be done about it at the moment unless there is a reasonable suspicion that it is AFB infected.

I am not sure whether an AP one has the ability to deregister a site themselves.

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3 hours ago, john berry said:

Unregistered apiarys get a notice under the lid and after 30 days they  can be destroyed. Unfortunately if the site is registered but all the hives are dead or there is gear lying around everywhere there is not a lot that can be done about it at the moment unless there is a reasonable suspicion that it is AFB infected.

I am not sure whether an AP one has the ability to deregister a site themselves.

You have just described many beekeepers home bases!

Edited by Maggie James
That's a tricky scenario!
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1 hour ago, Bee Real said:

What about when the apiary is registered, but the beekeeper can’t be reached even by the Agency?

In this day and age everyone, unless they are six foot under, is contactable. I am sure there are laws to be followed with procedures and timeframes re abandoned property.  

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13 hours ago, Maggie James said:

In this day and age everyone, unless they are six foot under, is contactable. I am sure there are laws to be followed with procedures and timeframes re abandoned property.  

A couple of years ago, out West Auck there was a plague of abandoned hives - the beek disappeared back to country of origin, so NZ mobile phone number NBG. Many had AFB.

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2 hours ago, Sailabee said:

A couple of years ago, out West Auck there was a plague of abandoned hives - the beek disappeared back to country of origin, so NZ mobile phone number NBG. Many had AFB.

This is exactly the situation I was referring to 

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On 2/12/2020 at 11:40 PM, Maggie James said:

In this day and age everyone, unless they are six foot under, is contactable. I am sure there are laws to be followed with procedures and timeframes re abandoned property.  

i'm not sure what databases they can legally access to find contact details. eg social welfare, police etc.

theres has been a few beeks abandoned apiaries and are still in nz tho most likely different phone number etc.

 

unfortunately nz history is full of people dumping animals etc when the industry goes bust leaving big problems for generations to come.

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There is one part of me that doesn't much care who the bkpr is.  If the colonies are within the realm of 'abandoned or neglected' (however that would need to be objectively defined...) I would be pleased if they were (1) immediately destroyed if any AFB at all is found (2) go through the process - probably must notify the land occupier, notice under lid, perhaps even newspaper notice? - to end up maybe 30 days later and then destroy the hives.

 

I guess if I think about it long enough, the only reason I have for wanting to identify the bkpr is to charge back for the privilege of removing these hives from the NZ situation, since the bkpr so obviously didn't/can't/won't.  But generally, given the situation that preceded the 'abandonment/neglect' of the hives, no money might be forthcoming anyway!

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54 minutes ago, NickWallingford said:

I guess if I think about it long enough, the only reason I have for wanting to identify the bkpr is to charge back for the privilege of removing these hives from the NZ situation, since the bkpr so obviously didn't/can't/won't.  But generally, given the situation that preceded the 'abandonment/neglect' of the hives, no money might be forthcoming anyway!

If the money can be retrieved so be it.  But the important thing is to get rid of the hives.  If this requires following the processes of abandonment, then that's the legal process. 

 

IMHO grass roots beekeepers, whether hobbyists or commercials who make their living from hives, both pay their hive levies as a form of insurance. These beekeepers (levy payers) who at the end of the day are the customer also expect neutral, friendly, informative, efficient, effective, economic and experienced administration & surveillance.  Quite rightly, they expect bang for their buck aiding them to earn a living or enjoy their hobby.   

 

 

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