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Are bees messy to neighbouring cars and property?


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Good day,

I am considering starting up beekeeping as a hobby and have everything to learn. 

Before I go and invest in the equipment needed, I felt I should check out what a friend told me which could affect my decision in going ahead or otherwise.

He said that he had read that bees create a real mess to neighbouring cars and houses by leaving a sticky residue all over the place.

Is it correct that bees can be messy and basically become a pest to yourself and your neighbours?

Thank you.

Craig

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If the neighbours house or car or whatever is at a high point the bees will prefer to fly around it than over. If it is below and between the hive and somewhere the bees would want to go, you have a p

I had to move some hive once...they were in a nice secluded clearing on a hillside on the edge of town, but unbeknown to me there was a car yard right on the flight path to a large stand of pohutukawa

This always makes me laugh when I hear complaints about cars and buildings.   People pay a fortune to have them waxed, yet here is a natural wax everyone is moaning about. Nothing a bottle o

Hi Craig,

 

When bees leave the hive they void themselves over what ever is under them. Cars, washing etc. This can be avoided by hive placement away from these areas or by putting them where they fly away from areas that could cause concern.

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This always makes me laugh when I hear complaints about cars and buildings.

 

People pay a fortune to have them waxed, yet here is a natural wax everyone is moaning about. Nothing a bottle of warm water wont cure as it will simply melt off.

 

Washing is a different problem, and yes despite my nonchalant attitude, your concerns should be taken seriously, although I still prefer them over bird poo.

 

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Ours miss the clothes line but are bulls-eye on the ute parked out the front (ours fortunately).

In a town situation their flight path can impact neighbours- and the prevailing wind can change the result from falling on the lawn to splattering the windows. Hive population is another factor.

Getting the locals onboard may save a lot of grief, and gives an opportunity to prevent poisoning issues if they know it can impact your bees.

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Bees can and do make a real mess and over the years I think I heard more complaints about bee droppings than I have about stings. The more hives you have in one spot  the more spots they leave. Some people get really uptight and then you have situations like car sales yards which I think rightly hate having bees nearby.

Having said all that most people manage to keep a hive or two in town without causing any grief.

 

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I shake my head and wonder....

When my supplier installed the bees for me, I was told that my neighbour would probably complain about the mess on his clothes line and that I couldn't have my clothes horse right behind the hive where it usually sat.

This is one reason why I now question everything I am told about bees.

 

The only time I have ever seen any sort of big bee poop was when I had to lock them down for the day while I went to work and then move them that afternoon.

On my work truck bonnet...one huge mess. Its still there, but not so brown now.

Strangely, nobody has ever asked me what it is.

 

I have spent too much time watching bees and other insects, its a bit of a passion.

I see them pooping while they are foraging. They fly off from their chosen plant, turn around, poop at a 45 degree angle and go back to their plant, same with paper wasps.

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We have 3 vehicles at home all wear the yellow badges from my bees. New  roof on the house....bee poo all over it!😂😂😂

 

11 years of bees at home and only one complaint from my mate over the fence when he was trying to sell his dark metallic blue mk2 escort, he had just washed it before someone came to look at it, bees had left their waxy streaks all over it.
 

we’ve had to move hives from apiaries before due to neighbours not liking bee poo on their 2.4x6m designer gold plated windows☹️

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For positioning a hive, is there any rule of thumb as to their flightpath and approx how far out from the hive would the worst of the mess start to be less obvious? Eg do they fly in a straight line for a certain distance...and poop within the first 20 metres etc?

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43 minutes ago, gordie said:

Eg do they fly in a straight line for a certain distance...and poop within the first 20 metres etc?

straight line....no. I have some that turn 90 degrees upon leaving the hive.

But 20-50 meters .....about right.

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If the neighbours house or car or whatever is at a high point the bees will prefer to fly around it than over. If it is below and between the hive and somewhere the bees would want to go, you have a problem. A row of trees can re direct the bees.

 

I have a new site by a fence with bush on the other side of the fence. The landowners house is 300 meters away I did not think there would be a problem. But the bees fly along the bushline rather than over it, and right over the landowners house, he is right now figuring if the poop is worth it to him to have the bees there.

 

Another site I had for years with no problems next to a subdivision. There was a windbreak of very old and very large trees between the bees and the houses, the bees flew around the trees to get to where they wanted to go and the houses were protected nobody had a problem. Then the trees got cut down all of a sudden there are major problems everybody complaining, I had to move the bees.

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As a hobbyist, I would think a more important question to consider is - do you have a LOT of spare time - particularly spring/summer?

Every year people start with one or two hives, and then 'get too busy' to keep up with gear and workload, so their hives have many swarms, and failing colonies.

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I had to move some hive once...they were in a nice secluded clearing on a hillside on the edge of town, but unbeknown to me there was a car yard right on the flight path to a large stand of pohutukawas, and it was an amazing year for flax....we all know what flax pollen poop is like...

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