Jump to content

Employer reluctant to supply EpiPens


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 56
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I've put some resources up, including a free online training program at      

EpiPen costs 120 and lasts in excess of 12 months usually. That's nothing near the 320 you estimated.   You order them online from Queenstown with free nationwide delivery, which means no tr

We know another couple well, they keep bees about 20km from here.  He is a pharmacist, she works in an office in town, they have 6 colonies on their property.  He decided to just keep a kit around 'ju

1 hour ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

What? as a cure or as a case of anaphylaxis.

Anaphylaxis due to Voltaren tablets.  The chopper had to be called for an airlift.  

 

I can't understand why you can buy Voltaren over the counter.  I have heard of all sorts of nasty side effects over the years.  Yet there seems to be some impetus to make paracetamol, a much safer drug, prescription only.  

Edited by Maggie James
  • Thanks 1
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

One of my granddaughters went into anaphylaxis with mango - had no idea that could be a trigger - my daughter was choosing between fire station and ER Dept as to which was closest - lucky she is in central Auck.

 

  • Good Info 1
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If employers, beekeepers, clubs etc are all going to race out and purchase an epipen, bear in mind that adrenaline can have fatal implications if the recipient has a history of high blood pressure.  So, if people are going to put pressure on employers to carry epipens, then perhaps there should be regular blood pressure checks!  Otherwise, the outcome could be just as devastating as an anaphylactic reaction.

Edited by Maggie James
  • Good Info 1
  • Confused 1
  • Disagree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I know of a relatively young beekeeper who was injected with adrenaline, and unbeknownst to the beekeper they not only had high blood pressure but a blocked artery.  This could have been fatal for the beekeeper, but this episode not only induced another medical problem, but diagnosis by emergency services found another potentially fatal condition.  This person not only survived, but beekeeps still today.

Edited by Maggie James
  • Disagree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

What absolute complete and utter crap.

 

Your primary first aid response is ABC

 

Airway

Breathing
Circulation

 

Anaphylaxis is an acute, potentially life-threatening systemic allergic reaction. Other than the upper airway obstruction (swelling), cardiovascular collapse (low blood pressure) is the second most life-threatening anaphylactic reaction and both require urgent treatment.

 

So as you can see, if the patient is having upper airway obstruction, their airway will be compromised. If they cannot breathe - they die. Then their bp drops affecting their blood perfusion - they die.

 

There are no contraindications for the administration of adrenaline
In medicine, a contraindication is a condition or factor that serves as a reason to withhold a certain medical treatment due to the harm that it would cause the patient.

 

In the situation where someone is having a life threatening anaphylactic reaction and you have access to the medication available to treat someone who could potentially die in front of you, you give it. Otherwise you will be explaining to the coroner why you didn't give it.

 

Having a history of high blood pressure is not a reason to not give life saving adrenaline to someone having an anaphylactic reaction.

 

 

  • Agree 2
  • Good Info 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

I know of a relatively young beekeeper who was injected with adrenaline, and unbeknownst to the beekeper they not only had high blood pressure but a blocked artery.  This could have been fatal for the beekeeper, but this episode diagnosed a potentially fatal condition.  This person still beekeeps today.

 

Just stop please. You followed up your initial comment because I happened to give you a thumbs down. You maybe a competent beekeeper, but now you're crossing into my territory and your comments, if taken out of context, could lead to someone dying because the person in a position to help paused or delayed giving adrenaline when needed, due to misguided comments about high blood pressure.

 

This is not a factor in the event of an anaphylactic reaction 

  • Thanks 1
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I once had an anaphylactic reaction to a drug being administered in hospital. It was the scariest thing I've ever been through. Fortunately the doctor realised something was wrong and stop the intravenous drug and I came right pretty quickly but I would not like to do that again.

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

A truck driver got stung a few kms away from me today and collapsed, had to get helicoptered away, nearly an hour wait.

Anyway, I had a visit asking if I had an EpiPen and said nah they're too expensive at 160 every six months and you have to order them at the pharmacy which means two trips into town, the guy should have one on him if its life threatening just like having diabetes, you should have insulin in your vehicle, if one of my family members was allergic I would have one but since I dont even know anyone who's allergic why should I spend hard earned money on such a poor season, I'll be lucky to cover costs as is.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes the price of them is not so bad now.

 

Used to be $700 at one stage because a rather nasty guy bought the company and jacked the price. Which was nice for him, because in certain workplaces in the US, and in schools there, they were legally required to have an epipen on site. But there was a court action and the guy had to drop the price by several multiples. 

 

I think the $700 price barrier was why they were not widely held in NZ, but at $120 it's a lot more affordable.

 

There is also that psycholgical factor where most people do not like waste, and the reality is that nearly all of them will be wasted. But it's just that one time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

We carry an epipen (it’s due for replacement) just in case. For our farmers or us. We will then carry both until I get the one after. My chemist also said to get a couple of antihistamines in ASAP as well. 
It’s cheap insurance for a better outcome. How would you feel if you could have, and something dire happened?

Edited by Bron
Link to post
Share on other sites
WWW.ALLERGY.ORG.AU

Adrenaline autoinjectors (e.g. EpiPen) should be stored in a cool dark place (such as an insulated wallet) at room temperature, between 15 and 25 d...

 

Might have to be some thought to that, although a thermally lined food bag should remain at a relatively constant temperature. Or even a small chilly bin type box (not chilled) to act as a thermal barrier?

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Grant said:
WWW.ALLERGY.ORG.AU

Adrenaline autoinjectors (e.g. EpiPen) should be stored in a cool dark place...

 

Might have to be some thought to that, although a thermally lined food bag should remain at a relatively constant temperature. Or even a small chilly bin type box (not chilled) to act as a thermal barrier?

That could work. Vehicles can get very warm, having a small temp gauge inside to monitor on those days.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...