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Apivar and Honey Supers?


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After briefly looking around for info regarding the use of Varroa treatments with honey supers, many say Bayvarol is OK with honey on, Apistan definitely NOT ok. They are similar chemicals, no? I don't like eating honey with pyrethroids in it, but what about Apivar? Amitraz apparently breaks down very quickly in the hive due to the fact that it is readily hydrolysed. According to Apivar.co.nz, they say do NOT use with honey supers, but the MAF online guide to Varroa says it is OK to use. I am so confused right now.

 

I need to know, because I feel I may have treated too early in the Spring (Aug) and the mite numbers have built up. My hives have both Varroa and honey.

 

Thanks in advance

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Basic properties of these chemicals:

 

Amitraz (Apivar) - is readily absorbed into honey but not into wax. This is why it is not recommended during a honey flow.

 

Fluvalinate (Apistan) - very readily absorbed into wax. The reason it is not recommended during a honey flow is that the dose of fluvalinate in an Apistan strip is very high (from memory around 800mg per strip)

 

Flumethrin (Bayvarol) is also very readily absorbed into wax. The dose is only 3.6mg per strip though so a treatment uses only around 1/100th of the chemical compared to Apistan. This is why it is the recommended emergency treatment if you have high mite numbers during a honeyflow.

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As far as I know, Bayvarol is the only one 'suitable' but I think that may be stretching it.

I don't think a little bit will kill you, But its not good either.

They test for it if you are selling it for export or whatever, and can't sell it if it is above accepted levels. And I'm pretty sure you're not allowed to do it for local market either, though I'm not sure how that's policed if you're going to jar it up and sell it yourself.

 

I guess you gotta look after your bees first of all, so you might lose a little there. I would consider taking off what honey is already there and keeping it separate.

can be a bit of a pain sometimes.

maybe the honey will stop you getting bitten by mosquitos ;)

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Thanks for that Otto. But can he still use the honey for normal use.

So, you can eat honey taken from Amitraz treated hives? (provided it has had a couple of weeks to hydrolyse???)

But thanks Otto. :)

If you're selling honey play by the rules and don't have apivar in the hive when the honey flow is on.

 

If it's for your own consumption it is completely up to you. From what I've read I think you'd have to be amazingly super sensitive to amitraz to be able to suffer any side effects from amitraz in honey as a result of having Apivar in a hive. But this is ONLY AN OPINION.

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If is me than I'll take the honey supers off and put straight the formic acid pads on top of the frames(top box if 2 brood boxes) and treat for 24 hours. Also reducing the entry is not a good option now because is getting hot in the midday., but I'll block the bottom if mesh floor is used.

After 24 hours the honey supers can go back on the hive.

Apivar, apistan, bayvarol strips need weeks of treatment.

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Maybe I'll try this one. Formic acid is corrosive and lethal to bees if overdosed though, right? Are there any commercially available products, or is it a DIY? Perhaps I need to consult beesource etc

We have specialists here on the forum regarding formic acid treatment. Check out their posts. Also formic acid is accepted world wide to be used in certified organic outfits.

My first formic acid treatment ever was this spring and I'm happy as I tried it.

Start here then you'll see : Using a Formic Acid Fumigator | NZ Beekeepers Forum

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