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Who has RewaRewa flowers in their area?????


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Have been looking at the rewarewa, and are finding very few flowers it ranges from none on a tree to about half a dozen. Talked to another beek who said he has been driving around looking the last few days and cant find any. Thoughts..... is this a year of very little rewarewa flow?

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Yes, I have a few hundred on the block; no flowers to speak off. On the other hand the Pigeonwood is covered in tiny buds, and Hinau looks good. Haven't checked Tawiri yet, more difficult to get to. Karo flowered quite well and has now finished; wineberry ravaged by possums just starting. Rangiora; the best in ten years. I expect Kamahi next and I'll try and get a look at it over the weekend. Odd about the Rewarewa. In general everything has been flowering very well so far.

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I have seen a Rewarewa flower in Tirau last week. I haven't checked yet but I thought I saw some down the road as well. I need lots of bee-flowers for my Telford course *winks at Dave. So far I have about 10 flowers in my flower press but need quite a few more.

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We gonna get hardly any rewa this year and we can do up to 8 tonne in a normal year just looking i reckon well be luky to do a couple of tonne, I agree dave rangiora is awsome in our area to the point i neary forgot it exsisted, got some cabbage tress about to go, Heketara ( tree daisy, pollen) also done really well, But Rewa i think is gonna be a dud year either that its way late but i dont see it even setting.Better be a good Manuka crop.

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Will you get Tawari your way Tony?

 

Not where we are specificly, there the odd tree around but haven't seen how its stacking up, the other beek in our area has hives in good Tawari areas. I am wondering if its gonna be a good white clover year things looking good at our end just need a few more degrees soil temp and well be away i think.

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Interesting. I notice the "trees for bees" research program that the NBA is doing focuses on finding trees that produce good pollen for the hives. Obviously pollen's important but I don't think I've ever lost a hive to pollen deficiency, whereas I've had heaps die because they ran out of honey. Seems to me like their priority is all wrong.

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Some areas do have pollen shortages, but your right not likly to die they kust wont develop, never heatf it called oleria, its proper name is heketara, and its flowering really well this year, yep chris thats it

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Is this it ?

That is Oleria ilicifolia. The (dentate) leaves are very unusual (for an Oleria). Better known as Hakeke. Thick musky scent in the evening.

It's Akeake (O. avicenniaefolia) that gets confused with Rangiora. The most common is O. arborescens, the common tree daisy, with great big heads of flowers and smooth but wavy margins on shiny leaves.

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There are a few different Olearia (tree daisies) one of which is Rani or Heketara. I think that there are a few of the genus that are blooming really well this year. In our most immediate area we have O. arborescens and although it is meant to occur from Bay of Plenty south to and including Stewart Island, it is definitely here in the Waitakere Ranges and putting on a great show at the moment. They bloom for quite a long period. I think that they produce pollen for our bees but not nectar as the girls show little interest in them despite the prolific blooms.

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Some areas do have pollen shortages, but your right not likly to die they kust wont develop, never heatf it called oleria, its proper name is heketara, and its flowering really well this year, yep chris thats it

OMG thats the last time i use my phone to post i'm a shocking speller but thats just silly:mask:, dave your right looking at the photo thats not heketara, its definatly Hakeke these leaves are way more toothed than heketara.

It's Akeake (O. avicenniaefolia) that gets confused with Rangiora. The most common is O. arborescens, the common tree daisy, with great big heads of flowers and smooth but wavy margins on shiny leaves.

Not sure how any one can confuse Akeake with Rangiora the leaf is wider on Rangiora and the underside is almost white, and the flower not even close at least not the ones i've seen, even from a distance they would look different?

Not sure how clear thess photo's are, The white trees in amongst the native is Rangiora, but the odd one could be Heketara.

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Rewarewa definitely flowers more some years than others and in Hawke's Bay this year there are almost no flowers. This is perfectly normal indeed it is more abnormal the way it has been flowering quite heavily for the last five years. older trees flower more regularly and some trees flower more than others . in a really heavy flowering year you even get buds coming out of the trunk .Rangiora is never worked by bees in this area for either pollen or nectar. It was originally thought that the honey from this plant was what caused Tutin poisoning . Mingimingi is a much more likely source of fresh honey at this time of year.Karaka was just starting to flower a week ago.

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