Jump to content

Doorstep honey sales


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 134
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

just remember that it was one of those outside the regs sellers that poisoned a number of people with tutin.

Tristian you reply to the forum as if we are all bloody thick, I doubt there is a beekeeper in NZ who doesn't know about tuttin poisoning with the publicity its had.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
just remember that it was one of those outside the regs sellers that poisoned a number of people with tutin.
Wasn't it someone who just ignored the regulations and sold comb honey in a known Tutin area well after the end of year date. It's impossible to protect against seller stupidity in a free society and the regulations worked in that the perp was prosecuted.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Tristian you reply to the forum as if we are all bloody thick, I doubt there is a beekeeper in NZ who doesn't know about tuttin poisoning with the publicity its had.

i've talked to plenty over the years (including a few beeks last year) who have never heard of it.

i still get asked if we have got varroa yet.

you seam to think joe public is intelligent. sorry to break it to ya but they are not.

Link to post
Share on other sites
i've talked to plenty over the years (including a few beeks last year) who have never heard of it.

i still get asked if we have got varroa yet.

you seam to think joe public is intelligent. sorry to break it to ya but they are not.

Aw, joe publics alright, just ,misinformed. And with our media it's really no surprise!

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
just remember that it was one of those outside the regs sellers that poisoned a number of people with tutin.

Yes, totally right. There is just not enough regulation in this country to be a safe place to live in. Every aspect for living should be prescribe by legislation. Why leave it to chance or variations of common sense.

Very soon, all bee keepers, commercial or hobbyist will be paying more levies for ACC due to someone falling off the top of a hive while attending to another. All it takes is one and it would be legislated that all beeks must have mechanical lifting equipment, yearly warrant of fitness, certified by approved engineers ect, ect. Only need one to swing a pendulum.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
i've talked to plenty over the years (including a few beeks last year) who have never heard of it.

i still get asked if we have got varroa yet.

you seam to think joe public is intelligent. sorry to break it to ya but they are not.

No body is born with an encyclopaedic intelligent brain. But with people like yourself who is so kind as to impart your knowledge to the ill-informed and with such encouragement, we are beginning to have more knowledgeable "joe public". There is now wiser beeks and we hope they pass that on as well. Thus, Bee Week at schools should be well participated by the truly experienced beeks. Unfortunately, that is not happening yet. A bit like an unopened book. Imagine kids going home telling parents what they learned. Or, they played with a bee that did not sting them.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
I doubt there is a beekeeper in NZ who doesn't know about tuttin poisoning with the publicity its had.

 

Hopefully that's true of existing beekeepers, Phill, but there are new beekeepers every day... and I can tell you for sure that there are existing beekeepers who still don't get the relationship between tutin, hoppers and honeydew - they still assume that it is a nectar crop.

Link to post
Share on other sites
There were post somewhere about testing by ingestion of honey a little at a time. I was thinking that there is a "safe" level and the effect is not permanent. So, if that is the case, then surely a "tiny" collected dew from the plant diluted with a known quantity of (before end of december)honey will give a safe experience and taste if any, so in future, there is a reference point to say,keep these honey for the bees.

 

I haven't had direct experience with tutin honey (and hope not to!), but I have spoken with a number of very experienced beekeepers who have, either directly or indirectly.

 

Yes, there's a 'safe' limit... but it's not at any level you can determine at home - it's a lab job because the concentration is so minute.

 

The honey is not identifiable by either colour or taste... because it is not often present as a 'pure' honey/honeydew - it's usually mixed with other honey in the comb, but is so toxic that as little as a single cell is dangerous.

 

In other words there's no 'reference point' you can establish, partly because the honey is not distinctive, partly because it will be different every time.

 

In terms of effects not being permanent... dead's pretty permanent, wouldn't you say? At the end of the day it's a neurotoxin. I can't think of a toxin that has a completely binary toxicity offhand - dead or absolutely fine after a bit... there tends to be a gradient in severity and longevity of effects.

 

One beek at the club says the council are planting them as they are native. Very confusing when there are other invasive plants being targeted for elimination and the council plants Tutu??:what:

 

We've had the same problem with them being planted here. The issue is simply that they are a native, and therefore a preferred planting, but Council were unaware of the toxicity issues or suitable alternatives until the info was offered. Sometimes its a matter of getting the right ears listening.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes, totally right. There is just not enough regulation in this country to be a safe place to live in. Every aspect for living should be prescribe by legislation. Why leave it to chance or variations of common sense.

Very soon, all bee keepers, commercial or hobbyist will be paying more levies for ACC due to someone falling off the top of a hive while attending to another. All it takes is one and it would be legislated that all beeks must have mechanical lifting equipment, yearly warrant of fitness, certified by approved engineers ect, ect. Only need one to swing a pendulum.

The counter is there is too much regulation. Common sense deals with most issues. Sadly everyone seems now to look to the Government to come up with a solution. A cursory review of the soviet union will show the inadequacy of extreme regulation to solve the issues of a community and society. The regulations won't and can't foresee every likely occurrence and are a crude tool.
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
The counter is there is too much regulation. Common sense deals with most issues. Sadly everyone seems now to look to the Government to come up with a solution. A cursory review of the soviet union will show the inadequacy of extreme regulation to solve the issues of a community and society. The regulations won't and can't foresee every likely occurrence and are a crude tool.

Exactly my point. Until all freedom is lost, then there is the realisation that we have over regulated and come to a more sensible position of individual responsibility. I remembered that I was encouraged to belong to a certain Union before fellow tradesmen would allow me to use tools. I just circum-navigate around that by "doing investigative work" which is part of my job description. Off course I knew that what I did would fix the problem.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Exactly my point. Until all freedom is lost, then there is the realisation that we have over regulated and come to a more sensible position of individual responsibility. I remembered that I was encouraged to belong to a certain Union before fellow tradesmen would allow me to use tools. I just circum-navigate around that by "doing investigative work" which is part of my job description. Off course I knew that what I did would fix the problem.

One of the major problems is people look at the letter of the law and look for the avenues the law does not cover within that. Unfortunately words cannot convey the actual intent or spirit of the law and therefore leaves it open for interpretation. This therefore leads to more legislation and regulation. Thats human nature for you. The lawyers love it all the way to the bank

Link to post
Share on other sites
You must know what you are doing when is about comb honey or you risk to harm somebody's life than you can live with that for the rest of your life.

 

Why? Can you not test some of the comb honey? If the test come back clean, would the rest of the box not be clean two?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The above posts really bother me because if you read the requirements for tutin monitoring in honey to avoid testing of honey for turin levels honey and thus comb honey must be removed from the hives before Dec 31st. you can NOT test comb honey, as each cell remains sealed and any one of those cells could contain sufficient tutin dew to kill.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Tutin is a neurotoxin, the effects of which on humans range from nausea through to severe epileptic-style seizures and death. Even elephants have died after having ingested tutu.

 

The last known mass-poisoning of human consumers from tutin-contaminated comb honey occurred between January and April 2008, with the toxic comb honey having been harvested and sold by a Whangamata apiarist. There is no antidote to tutin poisoning - the toxin effects the central nervous system, causing severe muscle spasms and inhibiting respiration. Of the 22 individuals who were poisoned in 2008, some were hospitalised after experiencing one or more severe seizures. Random testing by the NZ Food Safety Authority in the wake of this near-tragic event found high levels of tutin in comb honey produced by supposedly experienced apiarists in areas outside of the Coromandel Peninsula.

 

Three members of my own family were hospitalised in 2008 after having eaten the contaminated comb honey - purchased on a whim from a roadside stall near Whangamata. Since then, I have not accepted the argument put forward by the NZ Food Safety Authority that there is such a thing as a safe level of tutin in honey, while I support any form of education and regulation which will help prevent any future incidences of toxic honey poisonings in New Zealand.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

hi OtagoBob and welcome. Very sorry to hear your family were caught up in that event.

 

I'm curious to know how long your family members experienced symptoms for as a result of the poisoning, and do you/they feel there are any lingering effects now?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...