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Put some pasture mix in 3 years ago with a small amount of crimson clover mixed in. This clover usually does not persist but keeping the cows off it each spring seems to make a difference and it's really come on. Bees not working it much this year but I expect that is on account of the amount of jarrah blossom thats come out but it sure does look pretty.

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Put some pasture mix in 3 years ago with a small amount of crimson clover mixed in. This clover usually does not persist but keeping the cows off it each spring seems to make a difference and it's rea

I have  crimson clover plants in full flower and the bees are not working it. 

Unfortunately the soil in my paddocks is too acidic for white clover and summers too hot and dry for white clover. Our pastures in south west wa are primarily sub clover and rye grass so no good for b

3 hours ago, David C said:

Put some pasture mix in 3 years ago with a small amount of crimson clover mixed in. This clover usually does not persist but keeping the cows off it each spring seems to make a difference and it's really come on. Bees not working it much this year but I expect that is on account of the amount of jarrah blossom thats come out but it sure does look pretty.

 

Just wondering @David C if over time white clover had got a grip, and is so much easier for the bees to work? 

 

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20 hours ago, Grant said:

Is that down to temperature and conditions in the same way that it is for white clover?

They worked it last year, this year the Jarrah flow is pretty good and they work that for preference.  

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20 hours ago, Sailabee said:

 

Just wondering @David C if over time white clover had got a grip, and is so much easier for the bees to work? 

 

Unfortunately the soil in my paddocks is too acidic for white clover and summers too hot and dry for white clover. Our pastures in south west wa are primarily sub clover and rye grass so no good for bees. That is excepting the cape weed pollen.  Have noticed that they work the crimson clover more in the mornings. 

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Thanks @David C - I have really cruddy clay soil, and with our increasing drought problem, figure that what grows in Aussie, is becoming ever more relevant for me - right now the various colour callistimon's - bottle brushes, are about to come into full flower in series which right now is really helpful, so I am growing more Aussie and South African natives to counter the dry.

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