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Leftover Honey from Winter / Varroa Treatment


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Hello,

 

I’m new to beekeeping and only started last year. I brought my hives so far successful through the winter months. I left them quite a bit honey from the previous summer.

Now I checked my hives again because I wanted to start and treat for varroa. 

I noticed that there is still quite a lot of honey left in the box above the brood box. (roughly 20kg) - Now I’m wondering if this honey can be harvested prior to treating with varroa (treating with Apivar it says to not treat when honey super is on). Or will it be fine to harvest this around Christmas after the Varroa treatment period (even though not recommended due to varroa treatment).

 

Would be great to hear back about this.

 

Thanks a lot.

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Excess honey ......  I'd be inclined to make sure the brood  has four or five frames of honey to see them through to a new flow ..... any excess honey ,s tore it in the shed. If you need more feed bec

Restrictions on harvesting honey that has been collected while Varroa treatments are in the hive mostly apply to those wanting to sell their honey, especially to high-end markets in China, Europe etc.

Hello,   I’m new to beekeeping and only started last year. I brought my hives so far successful through the winter months. I left them quite a bit honey from the previous summer. Now I

Restrictions on harvesting honey that has been collected while Varroa treatments are in the hive mostly apply to those wanting to sell their honey, especially to high-end markets in China, Europe etc.

 

If you are harvesting honey for your own consumption or to give to friends my advice is to have a quick read up about the chemicals you have used to treat for Varroa and work out whether you are okay with eating honey that could have a trace amount of these in it. You would need to be extremely sensitive to them to suffer any effects from eating honey as the amounts that might be in your honey (if treatments were done correctly) will be miniscule.

 

In your case, I'd aim to harvest some of that excess honey now rather than waiting until Christmas. You have to lift that honey every time you go into the hive for a look, which I would find a pain. Some honeys also crystallise in the frames with time which make them very difficult to extract. Plus, the frames can be filled up again and have fresh honey in them by Christmas...

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Excess honey ......  I'd be inclined to make sure the brood  has four or five frames of honey to see them through to a new flow ..... any excess honey ,s tore it in the shed. If you need more feed because it keeps raining and blowing, then you have it on hand , and when the new honey comes on line, then extract what you have saved.

The biggest killer of hives in the next few months is starvation .....depending on where you are .  

 

What may seem like heavy hive now  could  be on deaths door in five weeks.

Some years we have poured raw sugar into the brood as we are optimistically throwing honey boxes on.

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