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At last, a frame that will biodegrade, or burn clean


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I'd like to know what they're made from. Palm kernel comes into the country by the cubic kilometre...I'd hate to think NZ beeks were contributing to Orangutan habitat destruction alongside the dairy c

I'm sorry guys ..... but the bio frame is a big yawn from me..... sort of.   We've spent over three weeks washing wax out of frames and cleaning them up ready for new foundation. These were

Congratulations Ecrotek!   To anyone who has had to burn AFB, you will know what a mess it is burning plastic frames.   This invention has been a long time coming, but finally it i

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I'm sorry guys ..... but the bio frame is a big yawn from me..... sort of.

 

We've spent over three weeks washing wax out of frames and cleaning them up ready for new foundation. These were frames that came off hives from a disease outbreak zone two years ago that we decided we really didn't want to put out again . The final part was putting the frames and boxes through the paraffin wax bath and giving the boxes a new coat of paint.

It's been a big job .

 

The end result is some upgraded gear and several potato boxes full of plastic combs that I am scratching my head as to what to do with.

The conclusion I have come to is that I hate plastic with a passion ....

 

And why would you go with anything else but wood and Manuka special foundation. 

At the end of the day, when the poo hits the fan the whole lot are recyclable , reusable and don't cost a fortune.

 

 

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13 minutes ago, jamesc said:

I'm sorry guys ..... but the bio frame is a big yawn from me..... sort of.

 

We've spent over three weeks washing wax out of frames and cleaning them up ready for new foundation. These were frames that came off hives from a disease outbreak zone two years ago that we decided we really didn't want to put out again . The final part was putting the frames and boxes through the paraffin wax bath and giving the boxes a new coat of paint.

It's been a big job .

 

The end result is some upgraded gear and several potato boxes full of plastic combs that I am scratching my head as to what to do with.

The conclusion I have come to is that I hate plastic with a passion ....

 

And why would you go with anything else but wood and Manuka special foundation. 

At the end of the day, when the poo hits the fan the whole lot are recyclable , reusable and don't cost a fortune.

 

 

Send the frames up North to Jaffa land as a guy is making plastic posts for the vineyards out of recycled plastic

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Apart from being environmentally unfriendly which is reason enough for me not to use plastic frames they also have the problem that they yet  gummed up with wax between the end bar and the box far worse than wooden frames ever do. It will be interesting to see what these new frames are like and whether they are any better.

I can remember we got a few plastic frames from America when I was still at school ,so nearly 50 years ago. I don't know what sort of plastic they had but the bees would rather draw foundation than work these frames even when they were drawn .

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There has been quite a learning curve with plastic frames down the years, in my view anyway we didn't get really good ones until ecrotek got into the business.

 

I have always found the little slits around the whole frame annoying but I think they are needed for strength. However they have been eliminated in the bioforme frames.

 

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27 minutes ago, Alastair said:

I have always found the little slits around the whole frame annoying but I think they are needed for strength.

slits will not add strength, solid is stronger, but not very much stronger. However, there are process issues to get the plastic ones made evenly, with no shrinkage and no flaws and using minimum materials for minimum cost. I think they insert granules into the mould which liquify in the mould and give surfaces an even coating. So I think it is easier to produce if all the part is of roughly equal thickness, it could be a problem to produce bit thick bits around the edge. They discuss small hive beetle in quite a lot of detail, saying that we don't have it "yet", but in NZ there are also small and large wax moth who love a good slit/slot/hole too.

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5 minutes ago, Alastair said:

But the slits are about strength, vs weight.

I'd prefer to say strength vs cost.

cost of material plus cost of production.

 

Weight of only a few g they don't care about because they think you've probably already got a bad back and so this won't change that.

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22 hours ago, Alastair said:

But yes, I am suspicious they will be more expensive.

I have spoken with Ecrotek and They will be sending me a frame.

They have told me that whilst the final price has yet to be determined, they expect the price to be mid way between traditional wood and wax frames and plastic frames.

 

I have been told that they believe that the main recycle part of the frames will be by burning and that commercial wood burners will probably be the best option.

They expect that the biodegrading part of the frames ability (composting) may not be so easy as once the frame has been used and covered in wax and propolis then composting may not be an option.  

The frames are made from a plant material.

 

Currently they will only be available in full depth format and depending on demand, then they will be produced in 3/4 format.

 

 

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26 minutes ago, Alastair said:

Great info Trevor, especially about the price.

 

If they are dearer than plastic, commercials won't go for it. If they are cheaper than plastic, commercials will.

Looks like mid way between plastic and wood/wax.  But, I would like to think that they can be safely disposed off will be worth the extra small cost.

 

Time will tell.

 

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I'd like to know what they're made from. Palm kernel comes into the country by the cubic kilometre...I'd hate to think NZ beeks were contributing to Orangutan habitat destruction alongside the dairy crowd...

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17 minutes ago, yesbut said:

I'd hate to think NZ beeks were contributing to Orangutan habitat destruction alongside the dairy crowd...

Tell the orangutans to move and get a real job, instead of just hanging around in trees.  And tell them to get a haircut as well.. 

Edited by Trevor Gillbanks
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2 hours ago, yesbut said:

I'd like to know what they're made from. Palm kernel

 

I have checked again with Ecrotek and as expected, the actual ingredients with the frame are a commercial secret.

However they did send me the following.

 

Just to confirm, the plant based material in the BioForme frame does not contain palm kernel or any derivative of palm products and the plant materials in the frame are sourced from certified sustainably managed and ethically run plantations. 

 

The big winner that I can see, is that we will be able to burn these frames with no more pollution than burning the same amount of pine.  Or they can be commercially composted (after they have been cleaned of wax and propolis).

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On 2/09/2020 at 7:35 PM, Bighands said:

Send the frames up North to Jaffa land as a guy is making plastic posts for the vineyards out of recycled plastic

We could use them for kiwifruit posts, and not need the bee hives,as the bees could be attracted to the posts. 

 

21 hours ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

I have been told that they believe that the main recycle part of the frames will be by burning and that commercial wood burners will probably be the best option.

 You mean the 44 gallon drum type commercial burner

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1 hour ago, Dennis Crowley said:

You mean the 44 gallon drum type commercial burner

That is one way.  But not practical for Commercial quantities.

Ecrotek are suggesting someone like wood drying burner units.  So they could be used as part of the fuel source for drying timber etc.

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It seems crazy that wooden frames are imported from overseas. I accept that slow-growing Baltic pine is a superior product but radiata pine frames are good enough and have been the industry standard for a long time.

I can remember when wooden sections for comb honey were made from white pine. I assume frames were made at some stage from native New Zealand timbers but I don't know which one. I still have a few White pine, kauri and totara boxes.Pukatea was used for wooden Queen cages.

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