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On 16/09/2020 at 7:36 PM, Phil46 said:

An area of manuka that is usually in full flower beginning of Nov,was starting to flower this weekend...the whole hillsides.Seems way too early so not sure whats happening there

Our manuka flow looked like it was coming on hard but most the flowers atleast 3 to 4 weeks away and the hives are at strength as of a few weeks ago so been chomping through the stores, gave a feed 4 weeks ago and hungry again

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Yes quite a catch 22 for those in the North. Bring the hives up strong to collect manuka, risk swarming. Get a good flowering and good weather, all good. Get a few weeks of rain, disaster. Wether to feed? How much? risk high C4's, don't feed enough, risk dead bees.

 

Lot's of skill and judgement required where you are Maru 👍

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When I looked in my hives a month ago one had two queens in it.

Both laying .

I am sure that was not the case in autumn.

I split the hive into two , because the queen did well last yr .

Today I looked at the hives and the queens are laying slabs of brood.

I can not work out when the second queen could have mated .

On the forum it has been discussed how queens can mate in autumn but not lay till spring .

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Interesting Kaihoka. 

 

Once as an experiment I made a batch of cells mid winter and put them in small nucs to see what would happen, as some of the hives had a few drones.

Epic fail, none of them mated. However a few years back I looked in a hive a bit after mid winter, and found it queenless and with one only queen cell. Not having any other options i closed the hive and left it to it's fate.

 

Couple months later surprise surprise, I open the hive and there is a beautiful young laying queen in it 🙂.

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1 hour ago, Alastair said:

Yes quite a catch 22 for those in the North. Bring the hives up strong to collect manuka, risk swarming. Get a good flowering and good weather, all good. Get a few weeks of rain, disaster. Wether to feed? How much? risk high C4's, don't feed enough, risk dead bees.

 

Lot's of skill and judgement required where you are Maru 👍

I was told by a few old beeks it's a fine line, and it really is.

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2 hours ago, Alastair said:

Interesting Kaihoka. 

 

Once as an experiment I made a batch of cells mid winter and put them in small nucs to see what would happen, as some of the hives had a few drones.

Epic fail, none of them mated. However a few years back I looked in a hive a bit after mid winter, and found it queenless and with one only queen cell. Not having any other options i closed the hive and left it to it's fate.

 

Couple months later surprise surprise, I open the hive and there is a beautiful young laying queen in it 🙂.

It was a mild winter with drones around and not much wind.

But no days were over 18 degrees .

Maybe queens can mate at lower temps than is thought possible .

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6 hours ago, kaihoka said:

It was a mild winter with drones around and not much wind.

But no days were over 18 degrees .

Maybe queens can mate at lower temps than is thought possible .

We get good mating around 14deg witch is about what we'll be getting for the next few days. Couple of my hives had good numbers of drones two weeks ago and one with a freshly made empty swarm cell. Id say they'd be all good to go if if i let them.Am looking through them today for more swarm cells,moving strips onto fresh brood. Cant wait to have a look in them.

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16 hours ago, Maru Hoani said:

Our manuka flow looked like it was coming on hard but most the flowers atleast 3 to 4 weeks away and the hives are at strength as of a few weeks ago so been chomping through the stores, gave a feed 4 weeks ago and hungry again

Time to make some splits? The hives i have near that early flowering are bringing in nectar from somewhere up in them hills,i dont think its from the manuka.

By the way,thats not me in the pic...its the landowner keen to see wat we do and wat the bees get up to!

IMG_20200919_113703.jpg

IMG_20200919_113602.jpg

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14 hours ago, Alastair said:

A lot of guys get queens mated in temperatures below 18. The way I judge it, if drones won't leave the hives, that tells you that you won't get queens mated.


I wonder if glorious sunshine, still, calm conditions and temps below 20 still work for mating... I had a double queen situation in August here in chch... let it run its course because I had no choice... and she was mated and laying at the beginning of September. Go figure. 

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2 hours ago, Phil46 said:

Time to make some splits? The hives i have near that early flowering are bringing in nectar from somewhere up in them hills,i dont think its from the manuka.

By the way,thats not me in the pic...its the landowner keen to see wat we do and wat the bees get up to!

IMG_20200919_113703.jpg

IMG_20200919_113602.jpg

i did think his bee suit looked particularly clean .

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10 minutes ago, CHCHPaul said:


I wonder if glorious sunshine, still, calm conditions and temps below 20 still work for mating... I had a double queen situation in August here in chch... let it run its course because I had no choice... and she was mated and laying at the beginning of September. Go figure. 

If bees didnt mate below 20 deg we would have to wait until January to see any action in Hoki.😂 In a good year.

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On 18/09/2020 at 6:52 PM, Maru Hoani said:

Our manuka flow looked like it was coming on hard but most the flowers atleast 3 to 4 weeks away and the hives are at strength as of a few weeks ago so been chomping through the stores, gave a feed 4 weeks ago and hungry again

Plenty of whitestuff here the other morning. We pulled the bees out of it though!

2D63D2D8-2C1E-45B9-981B-2F41258E4104.jpeg

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Yikes, reminds me of working bees on those freezing cold South Island early spring days. Worst of all when it also decided to rain, or sleet 😳.

 

Only good part was getting back into the truck (which did not have a heater), and waiting for a little warmth to seep through the firewall from the engine bay 😬.

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3 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

Really gotta say I don’t like not having the location visible.
 

I don’t want to have to check a profile every time I want to see where someone’s from to get an idea of whether there Post is more or less relevant to us in our area.

Well Mrs Pot now do you know how the rest of us felt when you described your domicile as "Earth" ????

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On 14/09/2020 at 8:31 PM, john berry said:

James. You have two audits a year because that is the way some bureaucrat has interpreted the law. It's like harvest declarations and being a registered beekeeper. Parliament makes the laws and bureaucrats interpret them and then  reinterpret them.

I doubt most of them even know the contempt the average beekeeper has for their petty expensive little rules.

It's not even as if they do any good. All those bits of paper and all that traceability and they still couldn't work out who was stretching manuka.

My uncle and my grandfather used to take them on every now and again and they won on a few occasions but man they could be vindictive afterwards.

They should be helping beekeepers not hindering them, the sad part is they probably think they are helping.

Good news Brothers in Hive Tools ..... sometimes the little pricks in the side of the rhinos eros work ......

And good on yer Asure quality for reacting to the little prick .....

Apparently the RMP procedure is up for revue shortly,,,, and we may well see a bit of logicity (new word) in how RMP's are worked by those who rule us.

Hallelujah .....  or words to that effect.

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