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2 minutes ago, Otto said:

Remembered that I had a photo from some of the pollen sampling I did last season. Collected at the end of November. Lots of blue pollen...

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Does it taste any different?

I got grey propolis one season and it smelled and tasted way different, havent had it since though.

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2 minutes ago, Maru Hoani said:

Does it taste any different?

I got grey propolis one season and it smelled and tasted way different, havent had it since though.

Can't say I eat a lot of pollen - not really something I enjoy. Would be surprised if different pollen didn't taste different though.

Fuchsia honey is very nice though. Crystallises very quickly, almost white) and has a subtle lemony tang to it. Probably my favourite local honey.

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5 hours ago, Otto said:

Remembered that I had a photo from some of the pollen sampling I did last season. Collected at the end of November. Lots of blue pollen...

 

There aren't many types of blue pollen, so if it's showing up then, that's what it will most likely be.  We don't have the native fuschia here, but the reason why I noted your comments is that one year a Colonies Report in the Beekeeper Journal, the writer noted the bees coming back to the hive carrying it with anthers & filaments hanging off their bodies

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2 hours ago, Maggie James said:

What was the pollen quality on analysis?  

It wasn't collected for nutritional analysis and I don't know the breakdown of different nutrients. These samples were taken to aid methods development for sequencing DNA extracted from pollen, both from single clumps and mixed samples.

My bees seem to have access to good and varied quantities of pollen in spring so the fact that they collect the fuchsia pollen certainly suggests that they get something out of it.

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5 minutes ago, Otto said:

sequencing DNA extracted from pollen, both from single clumps and mixed samples.

What was the reason for the DNA sequencing?

Re the fuschia honey - what is the pollen count required for this or are there other parameters?

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40 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

What was the reason for the DNA sequencing?

Re the fuschia honey - what is the pollen count required for this or are there other parameters?

I am not a big honey producer and don't produce quantities of this honey to make it worth selling on in bulk. So I have never had a pollen analysis done on it. Given the shape of the flowers my assumption has always been you wouldn't get much of the pollen in the honey anyway.

My calling it Fuchsia honey is based on knowledge passed down from other beekeepers in the area (such as Peter Sales and Allan McCaw) who know the area well,  kept bees here for a long time and carved out a niche knowing and selling our local honey. 

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I occasionally see fuchsia pollen and my understanding is that it's quite sticky and if the bees bump into a piece of grass on the way into the hive then it will stretch out like a piece of blue cotton. I have heard of fuchsia honey but have never tried it although I would love to. Possums cleaned out most of the trees in Hawke's Bay many years ago. We mostly see it way up in the mountains but I have seen a growing naturally right on the coast as well.

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5 minutes ago, Otto said:

Possibly hawthorn. That has a definite greenish tinge to it. 

That's interesting.  Out this way, all the old railway tracks were planted in hawthorn hedges, but I have never seen that colour pollen in my hives.  The first two years of T4Bs they were based at Lincoln and I supplied a large amount of pollen and plant specimens, but I don't recall that colour, and I definitely supplied bees with pollen sacs full of pollen.  I do know it came up quite high in the nutritional values.  

 

What I can tell you from my experience is that apiaries near the Hawthorn, in spring, I would only inspect on a warm day prob middle of the day.  Cos if the air temp dropped, the hives got s....y  It was like the nectar and pollen flow stopped at a certain temp, and with a hive of grumpy old field bees in spring, I valued my comfort! 

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15 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

 

 

 

That's interesting.  Out this way, all the old railway tracks were planted in hawthorn hedges, but I have never seen that colour pollen in my hives.  The first two years of T4Bs they were based at Lincoln and I supplied a large amount of pollen and plant specimens, but I don't recall that colour, and I definitely supplied bees with pollen sacs full of pollen.  I do know it came up quite high in the nutritional values.  

 

What I can tell you from my experience is that apiaries near the Hawthorn, in spring, I would only inspect on a warm day prob middle of the day.  Cos if the air temp dropped, the hives got s....y  It was like the nectar and pollen flow stopped at a certain temp, and with a hive of grumpy old field bees in spring, I valued my comfort! 

Can't say I've had obvious issues with grumpy bees at that time of year. Down here the hawthorn and broom often come in to flower at the same time. That is when the bees get properly difficult to keep at home. A glut of highly nutritious food just as they are reaching full strength = swarmy bees.

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6 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Today I received an email notifying me that my RMP is up for it's six monthly  revue ..... again.

 

Now .... this cranked up the old record again ....  raised my BP and resulted in me seeking counsel with my Doctor.

 

The Doctor prescribed a liquid remedy and assured me that in the end all would be alright ..... but I am not so sure.

 

So, I' say it again .....

 

'' Why, when we extract honey once a year for six or seven weeks do we need a twice yearly audit of the facilities ?'

Why, when we make one honey sale a year, do we need a twice yearly audit ?

 

And why, the years extraction records and mouse trap kill records have already been checked, and the extraction plant is pulled apart for maintenance, do I need to entertain the powers that be and waste a day showing them exactly the same paperwork I showed them six months ago ?

 

This is bull#### ..... and we as peasants need to once again sharpen our hive tools and rise up out of our complacency and say NO ...../ we do not need a twice yearly audit to run our business.

 

What I can't understand, if a second audit is absolutely necessary, why it can't be done with the beekeeper sending a video to the auditor, and being billed a very minimal rate.  The auditor already knows the layout of the outfit

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