Jump to content

2020 Colony Loss Survey - coming soon


Recommended Posts

The 2020 NZ Colony Loss Survey will launch in early September. Please watch your email inboxes for an invitation to participate.

For those who are unfamiliar with the survey, the goal is to quantify winter losses across both regions and time. While NZ's winter loss rates are 'low' by international standards, NZ beekeepers lost around 82,000 hives last winter. Moreover, loss rates at a national level increased 25% between 2015 and 2019. And while some places like the lower South Island have seen year-on-year increases in loss rates since 2015, others like the lower North Island have seen steady decreases in loss rates.

 

The survey is conducted by Manaaki Whenua - Landcare Research on behalf of MPI. The survey is not affiliated with any industry group. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to participate. 

 

For those who have completed the survey in the past, much of it will look familiar. However, I am working on adding some new questions about where beekeepers go to for advice and information, including this forum. I've also made it possible to move backward so you can correct answers if you need to (which sounds simple was was really hard to change!).   

 

Thanks very much for supporting this research.

 

Pike

 

P.S. For anyone who is interested, results going back to 2015 can be found on MPI's website: https://www.mpi.govt.nz/protection-and-response/readiness/bee-biosecurity/bee-colony-loss-survey. The 2019 results are summarised in the infographic, which can be downloaded below.

CLSS- one sheet_A4.pdf

Edited by Pike
  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 14
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

The 2020 NZ Colony Loss Survey will launch in early September. Please watch your email inboxes for an invitation to participate. For those who are unfamiliar with the survey, the goal is to quant

Most beekeepers don't have a major AFB problem but we're all just one mistake away from having one.

Thanks @Gino de Graaf for raising the question about intentional losses and to @Maggie James for pointing out the text box at the end. I read those comments thoroughly every year so make future improv

I have just finished my first spring round and fortunately there were no surprises. Hives have come through but weaker than normal which is not surprising given the hard late summer\autumn caused by drought.

Every year since varoa the hives seem on average to be just a little bit weaker every year. If this trend continues we will eventually get to the point where we get some pretty massive losses.

On the plus side thanks to vespex I did not lose a single hive to wasps this year and there were a fair few around before the poison went out.

I really encourage everyone to participate in the survey. It not only gives a good overview of winter loss trends but by participating you also have to sit down and have a look at what has happened to your own hives over the winter .

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Grant featured this topic

have to agree about the wasps damaged or lost hives due to wasps, our total would only be 3 this year, but hive loss and numbers or low numbers in hives that where strong one month ago is climbing for no reason that  i can see, strips in tons of honey left on and in easy reach of bees,

there seems to be a big lost in hives that were left on straw berrie blocks and vege producing blocks!

  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have just finished my spring round and a quick tally up shows a 2.5% winter hive loss for hives with one-year-old queens and 5% loss for those that were autumn re-queened.Three  starved (robbed out in autumn) and the rest (16)were split evenly between queenless and drone layer .

Most of the queenless and drone layer hives were still alive but  as they would not survive I class them as dead (Schrödingers beehive). 

Given the terrible dry late summer\autumn we had I'm pretty happy with this result but that I do expect to find a fair few failing queens on the next round which is just what happens since varoa. I have plenty of autumn splits to make up any losses.

Not one lost to wasps or stock damage, a few hives were knocked round a bit but were still reasonably weather tight.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
On 13/09/2020 at 10:52 AM, Gino de Graaf said:

How does intentional Loss get reported? 

If one requires dead outs in spring in which to place surplus brood, as an example.

If I autumn requeen, and don't worry about failures. Which is what I want, so is it then a bad occurrence. It's strategic.

Its up to you how you report that, but if it's your intention to allow that to happen then I'd say you don't have a "loss of hive" problem as it's part of your management.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 13/09/2020 at 10:52 AM, Gino de Graaf said:

How does intentional Loss get reported? 

If one requires dead outs in spring in which to place surplus brood, as an example.

If I autumn requeen, and don't worry about failures. Which is what I want, so is it then a bad occurrence. It's strategic.

There is an area for comments at the end of the survey, so perhaps put it there.

 

Can't remember the format now, but I commented along the lines there was no allowance for requeening with queen cells and protected queen cells.  I'm bit of a fan of protected queen cells if the apiary is near a river bed, cos I have a good success rate at those sites.  Although I do understand for reasons that not all beekeepers like this concept.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to say that I was really surprised that the survey results states that the highest loses were from

1 queen problems=30.3%

2 Varroa=28.10%

3 Starvation=10.3%

4 Wasps= 9.6%

5 Robbing=4.5%...=82.8%

....and I had always bought into the idea that we had a Huge AFB problem.

Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, mischief said:

I have to say that I was really surprised that the survey results states that the highest loses were from

1 queen problems=30.3%

2 Varroa=28.10%

3 Starvation=10.3%

4 Wasps= 9.6%

5 Robbing=4.5%...=82.8%

....and I had always bought into the idea that we had a Huge AFB problem.

I think we have a huge  "fear of a major AFB outbreak problem happening" than the reality of how bad it is.

Now I know you all going to to tell me you have red hot spots within 2km of your hive sites, therefor there's a huge problem, and I'm sure in localized areas there may be/has been, or when people fill out the form they are lying, or the ones with afb problems do not fill out the form, or the red spots are just honest beeks reporting that they have found and dealt to an afb hive. Which is a good thing.

  • Good Info 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks @Gino de Graaf for raising the question about intentional losses and to @Maggie James for pointing out the text box at the end. I read those comments thoroughly every year so make future improvements in the questionnaire. For example, the fact that we ask about queen replacement strategies at all is due to a comment on a past survey. 

 

It's very early days still, but I had a look at the preliminary results for this year a few days ago. At this early stage, it looks like winter loss rates were higher (sometimes much higher) than last year in Auckland, Coromandel, Hawke’s Bay, Manawatu, Wellington (not Wairarapa), Tasman/Nelson, Marlborough, West Coast, Otago and Southland. Loss rates seem to be down quite a bit in Gisborne and Taranaki and on par with last year everywhere else. It will be interesting to see if these continue to hold as more responses come in.   

  • Like 1
  • Good Info 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

18 minutes ago, yesbut said:

You could ask about spring losses too if you want more gloom !

 

I think in some parts of the country this is a very pertinent comment.  In Canterbury we get important pollen & nectar flows Sept & Oct, important for brood rearing & build up, then we go into a dearth early November.  That's when many novices in rural areas lose hives.  As a rule, hives here are not self suffcient until late November.  Last year it was later, due to our horrenodus spring weather - mid December.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 18/09/2020 at 6:32 PM, yesbut said:

You could ask about spring losses too if you want more gloom !

Thats actually a good point...we do not have such severe winters as the northern hemisphere.

 

Having worked 'with stats' in the past, i know how difficult it can be to formulate surveys to get complete pictures and have noted this country does not lose colonies just in winter, so right there is a missing piece of the puzzle.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...