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12 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

This just sounds like another layer of bureaucracy to me.  Beekeepers are already in overload with compulsive regulation.  I totally support the AFB PMP on AFB issues, but what will be the next thing that you are advocating becomes compulsory? 

 

If you are finding AFB inspections difficult because of PMS, then I suspect that you need some continuing education with networking, more experience, and need to find a decent club and join it, and if necessary get a second opinion as to what is occurring in your hive/s.  

 

Or are you an AP2 posting on here? 

 

 

😆 cant even become an AP2, all positions are full, I've been trying in my district for a few years to supplement my wages and clean up my area but keep getting told they'll let me no when a position is available yet here we are in the red zone.

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This morning was a multi tasking day.. a prep day for Monday.. I shifted some new double Nuc boxes to a site ready for Monday’s job of transferring .. time to cut the cold core flute Nuc box from my o

I think if the AFB was found and reported by a beekeeper then they are far from a useless beekeeper and jn fact are very good beekeepers first for finding it and second for reporting it.   I

Hives are absolutely pumping, still 4 weeks left before my bayvarols due out, just wondering if I'm gonna need to super a few weeks early. Doubles are almost ready for splitting and queen rearing

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2 minutes ago, Maru Hoani said:

here we are in the red zone.

Yes, and for some this is just another added stress of being in business and looking after bees.

 

I also think if people are going to make statements with certain opinions, I would prefer if they were open as to who they are and don't hide behind a moniker.  

 

 

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32 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

If you are finding AFB inspections difficult because of PMS, then I suspect that you need some continuing education with networking, more experience, and need to find a decent club and join it, and if necessary get a second opinion as to what is occurring in your hive/s.  

 

Or are you an AP2 posting on here? 

Bee Real didn't say it had problems identifying between PMS and AFB.

Others might. 

Can't agree with a twice yearly treatment policy. 

Though some note/action required if hives keeling over on an AFB inspection could work well.

Possible that there could be a correlation between AFB and mite collapse. If beekeeper fails to treat mites possibly they could be ignoring other issues? 

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8 minutes ago, Gino de Graaf said:

If beekeeper fails to treat mites possibly they could be ignoring other issues? 

There's lots of issues they could be ignoring and I doubt whether compulsory treatment will fix these.  Then there's the major issue, are we going to be told what to treat with and what dosage, and what is an acceptable treatment regime by authorities?  

 

I seriously think if an inspection is lengthened because a beekeeper can't tell the difference between PMS and AFB there are definitely other issues; not all beekeeping related.  PMS is PMS, and shouldn't really extend the inspection time of a hive; creating an expensive exercise.  

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On 4/08/2020 at 9:48 PM, John T said:

I found an interesting frame today...

 

 

beepic.jpg

Australians all let us rejoice...

...golden soil and wealth for toil

Our home is girthed by sea .....eeerrr honey?

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3 hours ago, Gino de Graaf said:

Can't agree with a twice yearly treatment policy. 

What's the practical difference between needing to treat, and being required to treat ? Do you only treat once a year ?

1 hour ago, Alastair said:

First, if a person is an AP2, they are not allowed to say so on social media.

What's the rationale for this ?

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30 minutes ago, yesbut said:

What's the practical difference between needing to treat, and being required to treat ? Do you only treat once a year ?

Well, if on inspection hives dead or dying out due to viruses then action must be required by beekeeper.

 

I am not saying must treat, because everyone treats differently. And treatment doesn't always work.

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Alastair said:

So now we have a situation where the average commercial outfit in early spring has around 10% of their hives sitting around empty. If

It's not all 10% empty. As you said, queenless, drone layers... They often have bees till early spring.

 

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5 hours ago, Alastair said:

it makes me cringe when I see newish members being jumped on or squashed. It's bullying and some of those people never come back. 

 

Actually to be honest there haven't been any recent incidents I can think of and really I think there has been a good improvement. But if you do see it, then report it; "they" is "us". Either that or just ban a few of the perennial helpers from helping anyone. haha. 

 

Maybe we should have an emoji that says in a friendly nice way, that you're way off track and out of your depth to say such a thing, but we'll try to get you back on the rails and up to speed as best we can. Thomas the tank engine 🚂 perhaps? If we already have enough emoji maybe we should eliminate some, for example put the spoon into the coffee cup so those two are one. 

 

I think we only need one newbee encouragement, how about 🚑  "needs kind advice" 

 

 

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11 minutes ago, ChrisM said:

Maybe we should have an emoji that says in a friendly nice way, that you're way off track and out of your depth to say such a thing,

 

But that would be a matter of opinion of the person who posted the emoji 😉

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6 hours ago, Alastair said:

if a person is an AP2, they are not allowed to say so on social media.

 

4 hours ago, yesbut said:

What's the rationale for this ?

 

I don't know. All AP2's sign a contract and one of the things on that contract is that they can not discuss anything related to their AP2 work on social media. I would speculate it would be to avoid a situation of somebody shooting their mouth off about something and representing the agency poorly. Some AP2's may be better beekeepers than politicians. 😄

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I have seen an AP2 misdiagnose PMS as AFB although it was in the early days of varoa. I also new some beekeepers who claimed that PMS can look exactly like AFB and to be honest I didn't believe them until around 10 years ago when I found two hives that had obvious PMS but some of the brood roped out exactly like AFB. All symptoms disappeared after treatment so  it wasn't AFB.

Everybody treating at the same time would be nice but there's no point in legislating for it as you  can't cure stupidity with legislation. I am sure I occasionally get reinvasion from poorly managed hives but  I'm pretty convinced that most reinvasion comes from dying feral hives. Bad swarming years seem to be invariably followed by bad varoa winters.

It would be  nice to think that none of us let our hives swarm but even the best beekeepers  lose swarms when conditions are  bad.

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Had a really great today, absolutely fabulous weather.  We drove to Taylors Mistake and walked into Boulder Bay, where the original batches built into the clay cliffs date back to 1880.  Then sat in a cafe on the beach in summer watching the pea soup fog rolling in.

 

One little insy bee job on the way home, giving the hives down near the river a stimulation feed.  These are booming, so have 4 brood boxes on.  Much better than the hives at Irwell, which for the first time I have used pollen supplement.  Bring on the broom and willow in the Irwell Creek.  

 

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Darn alarm clock went off predawn this morning ...... false alarm, just a notification from the Agency to monitor hives for the next eighteen months.

At least someone is looking !

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7 hours ago, yesbut said:

What's the practical difference between needing to treat, and being required to treat ? Do you only treat once a year ?

What's the rationale for this ?

sometimes. It has been each of in error (somehow missed a treatment season cycle), in experiment(varroa-resistant bees?), and in judgement of no need to treat.

The first has resulted in a dead hive, the latter two haven't.

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7 hours ago, Gino de Graaf said:

It's not all 10% empty. As you said, queenless, drone layers... They often have bees till early spring.

 

I try and kill the failing queens if not blow the bees out with my cordless blower a bit away from the site, find really strong hives and unite. So far I've had 80 losses from 700 hives due to starvation(6), mites (24), failing queens/queen less (51).

Found quite alot of drone layers this winter.

So far 620 left

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On 20/08/2020 at 8:38 PM, Alastair said:

 

Busy little bees come out after the storm today. Enjoying the sun, doing their thing :).

 

 

 


Nice! Busy busy bees. 
 

Are they excluders and supers on some of those hives Alistair? 

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Noted how wet on top mine were.  Stapled wire netting across bottom of empty super, laid sacking on top of that, filled box up with  shavings, stuck it on top of hive under ventilated lid....a Warre "quilt" in other words...should have done it in March.

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1 hour ago, yesbut said:

Noted how wet on top mine were.  Stapled wire netting across bottom of empty super, laid sacking on top of that, filled box up with  shavings, stuck it on top of hive under ventilated lid....a Warre "quilt" in other words...should have done it in March.

are the shavings intended to act as a sponge to soak up water or to act as an insulation like "batts". If acting as an insulator maybe you have a hive mat under the quilt box and I should already know that?

 

I use some some polystryene, duvet and mattress protectors whatever I have to hand, but over a wood barrier so they don't absorb water from inside the hive and only act as an insulator above the ceiling. I also don't ventilate top, instead I'm trying to keep the warm air contained inside, my ventilation is only at the bottom. My goal is a warm ceiling and cold walls so the moist bee breath condenses on the sides and runs down to the base; or to state the reverse, moisture is not condensing on the ceiling and not dripping down on the cluster. Having all the warm air escape out of the top of the hive doesn't appeal that much to me if it draws in a cold draught from the base.

 

 

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28 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Both and ventilation too

 

well, I totally agree about the insulation on top. So that is one of out three :) 

 

To take the contrary point of view, can you put forwards logical reasons for wanting a wet sponge above your colony and for wanting to get rid of any warm air at the top and replacing with cold air from the bottom?

 

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