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I have just watched the big expose on TV one about roundup in manuka honey. Man they must be short of news to put on such a anti roundup biased piece of garbage. No mention of other honey types which

What a blatant piece of advertising from purity to the detriment of every beekeeper in New Zealand. As for some of the crap from the other beekeeper . Saying that hives have died from roundup poisonin

If I had any doubts about television journalism then I have no longer. I just read an article on the TV one News online about how an incest repellent may help protect you from covid . I'm not sur

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This issue has been around for sometime. Residues of glyphosate have been detected in honey worldwide.

Glyphosate was first released to market in NZ since about 1980, so you are well soaked in it by now.

 

In 2015 the IRAC declared that glyphosate was a probable human carcinogen.

 

USA

 

Canada

  • The Canadian Food Inspection Agency reported glyphosate in 29.7% of 3,188 food samples tested in 2015–2016.
  • 2019 98.5% of 200 honey samples tested contained glyphosate.  ○ DOI: 10.1080/19440049.2019.1577993 

Europe

European Food Safety Authority 2016 report on pesticide residues in food. Published in 2018. See section 4.2.4, Page 67: I quote; "Considering the individual food products analysed, glyphosate residues were mainly analysed in wheat and rye (813 and 542 samples, respectively), apples, tomatoes, wine grapes, honey and other apicultural products, strawberries, table grapes, sweet peppers, lettuces, asparagus, plums, leeks, potatoes, kiwi fruits, carrots, cherries and pineapples".

 

New Zealand

July 2019 Beekeeper article about glyphosate residues in NZ honey published by Stephen Howse. see attachment.

MPI tested honey for gyphosate in 2017/18 and 2018/19  Report is below.

Testing prior to this date had not been done as MPI risk assessments said it was safe plus costs of testing were high. Things change rapidly when the IARC says it is a probable carcinogen.

 

Where are we now? Well we do not know the route from spraying to honey, assuming it is via the nectar gathered by the bees.

Perhaps it is from pollen subsitute patties imported and made from glyphosate resistant plant material. Need proof of this.

There is some thought that glyphosate is much more persistent in the environment than Monsanto studies predicted. Need proof of this.

 

We do not measure volumes of pesticide used in NZ or do we monitor on what crops it is used.

Example; the EPA had to ask the AgChem industry for this data for their reassessment of neonicotinoids.

So if talking to your MP this election ask for more transparency in the AG Chem industry's activities in NZ.

 

NZ honey has been shipped back from overseas due to having residues of glyphosate. So this a serious problem for exporters.

 

Glyphosate article published NZ Bkpr Jul 2019.pdf 1.-NCRP-Results-for-Agricultural-Compounds-in-Honey.pdf

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8 minutes ago, yesbut said:

That went down the tube when you and half of NZ cancelled your subscriptions.

Nope, I still get a daily paper although sometimes I wonder why. I have noticed as I have got older I pay a lot more attention to the death notices. 

If glyphosate really is dangerous then MPI should do something about it and if it is not then they should be more careful about what they do with potentially damaging information.

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Exactly Alastair, load of old cobblers on the news - anyone who owns a pair of red bands knows that glyphosate does jack-zip to gorse, usually the like of Tordon or Grazon is used. The typical and unscrupulous  'money at any cost' leading the gormlous reporter up the garden path, trying to justify price gouging of their own product. It is another sad case of resellers biting the hand of those that do the real work as primary producers - the beekeepers.

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Apparently roundup will kill gorse but as far as I can find out is not the spray of choice especially for large areas . It would be nice to make TV one apologise to the beekeeping industry for all their factual errors but the unfortunate reality of this sort of crap is the sooner it dies away the better. 

Gorse has no nectar and while bees do work it freely for pollen it generally flowers at a time of year when there is no major honey flow so I find it hard to imagine how it could be a source of roundup contamination even if it had been sprayed. 

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I use roundup on gorse.  I prefer it to Tordon.  The gorse dies, but the grass around it comes back again.  Over the years my grafting has had large areas of gorse, so I have used roundup for years to control gorse enough, helping to enable the yard to be an efficient grafting yard.  

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Roundup is not as effective on gorse as some of the others though, and due to the fact it also kills grass it would be a very rare thing for a farmer to use roundup to kill a large gorse infestation.

Edited by Alastair
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I'm telling yah Bro .... if I has hiring a helicopter to spray gorse, to use glyphosate would be a total waste of money and resources. Tordon is the chemical of choice, followed by it's cheaper cousin metsulfuron ..... and all need sticker agent to make it work..... and apparently it's the sticker that is the nasty stuff.

 

A few years ago a friendly mate did my veggie garden with his 'Death and ###### ######' spray he used around his bees.  It was a cocktail of about five different herbicides.  I got no veggie's for two years, and never used the plot again.

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You are right James, only a monkey would spray roundup from a helicopter to kill gorse.

 

So James, and any other experienced farming types, a question. It's probably time for me to quit using roundup for weeds around the hives, incase the day comes when my honey is tested. What should I best use instead?

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1 hour ago, Alastair said:

You are right James, only a monkey would spray roundup from a helicopter to kill gorse.

 

So James, and any other experienced farming types, a question. It's probably time for me to quit using roundup for weeds around the hives, incase the day comes when my honey is tested. What should I best use instead?

Lawn mower and weed eater with a blade .... failing that ,an old fashioned sycle.

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15 hours ago, Alastair said:

First off, the beekeeper complaining that as soon as the gorse around the corner is sprayed (implying roundup), all his hives die. "Nothing you can do" he said.

its not the roundup that kills the bees its the surfactant thats in the mix, especially with heli spraying.

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3 hours ago, Alastair said:

Roundup is not as effective on gorse as some of the others though, and due to the fact it also kills grass it would be a very rare thing for a farmer to use roundup to kill a large gorse infestation.

One exception being the establishment of Manuka Plantations! Ironic

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8 hours ago, Sailabee said:

Exactly Alastair, load of old cobblers on the news - anyone who owns a pair of red bands knows that glyphosate does jack-zip to gorse, usually the like of Tordon or Grazon is used. The typical and unscrupulous  'money at any cost' leading the gormlous reporter up the garden path, trying to justify price gouging of their own product. It is another sad case of resellers biting the hand of those that do the real work as primary producers - the beekeepers.

I own red bands, and I know that glyphosate is a very good gorse killer. It is an amazing broad spectrum herbicide, but it is a useless insecticide.  It is harmless to honey bees, and as has been stated it is the penetrant used with it that is hard on bees if they get hit directly by the spray. As I just said in another post, ironically, it is Glyphosate that is used with other chemicals to inhibit germination when establishing Manuka Plantations. The Glyphosate takes out the grasses, the Kanuka, the Manuka, and every other tree growing in the  area pre-planting.

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21 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:


and there you go Puriti front and centre.

Was it Adam boot or midlands that got in touch with the media with this “story” for  some free advertising ?

Just to be clear. Neither Midlands or Myself initiated the story. I do not believe any company involved in either of the Sunday or Monday segments initiated the article either. TV1 formulated the article based on information from the MPI. TV1 will have approached multiple companies and organisations for comment and or response. 

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2 hours ago, Boot said:

Just to be clear. Neither Midlands or Myself initiated the story. I do not believe any company involved in either of the Sunday or Monday segments initiated the article either. TV1 formulated the article based on information from the MPI. TV1 will have approached multiple companies and organisations for comment and or response. 

Lol. It's funny that your brand got great promo at the end. You must have known that beeks will sharpen their knives with your play....

Do you know how that dim wit got the goss? Why did he pull that info?

 

 

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Adam. I'm glad you didn't initiate the story but purity does come across as cheering it on. I know when you do this sort of thing you have no control over editing and hindsight is a wonderful thing but every beekeeper and packer in the country should have steered as far away from this thing as they possibly could of. 

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All said and done wouldn't a better beekeeping stance be to reduce/eliminate the contamination of our honeys in NZ? Glypho is a very useful chemical but the likes of Europe is on phase out of it's use over 5 years (4 left to go?) if we don't follow suit we are simply setting ourselves up for trouble. 

The positive of the news item may be that we may now take notice of the problem and maybe, just maybe do something about it rather than hope it doesn't "leak out" and spoil our image further.

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5 hours ago, Boot said:

Just to be clear. Neither Midlands or Myself initiated the story. I do not believe any company involved in either of the Sunday or Monday segments initiated the article either. TV1 formulated the article based on information from the MPI. TV1 will have approached multiple companies and organisations for comment and or response. 


so MPI are responsible for the article ?

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