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I am surprised they are using UMF 5, UMF 15 is a lot more effective for that sort of work.   A study I read some years ago said that if a honey is used that effectively kills invading bacter

My daughter Has a leg ulcer that’s being treated at the local doctors office. I was pretty impressed when the nurse asked her if she would be OK with having Manuka honey put on it.   

Way back in 1996 it was a bad year for the honey crop, too cold if I remember right. So I didn't shift my hives to the high country, kept them all on the Taieri Plains. It was a hard season for the be

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Our beekeeper neighbour is using it on sores on her elderly fathers legs And it’s doing a really good job.

She also uses it for healing cuts and scrapes on her horses.

my girls leg is getting better every day but I can’t say if it’s the honey or the antibiotics.

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10 hours ago, tristan said:

i hate to say it but there was a trail done which showed manuka was not good for treating leg ulcers. i have no idea why.

 

Done overseas? The photos that Peter Molan showed of ulcers that had been treated during the original trials were very graphic in demonstrating the speed with which manuka acted.

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From what i understand, the wound dressing level for Manuka honey is 10+ according to Dr Molan, or what he would call "medical Manuka" I think the wound dressing market use 16-8+. The higher the + after 18 the less effective it becomes, or there is no better effect.

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In the UK the NHS is recommending people try honey in hot water, with lemon juice for coughs before rocking up to their GP.  Not only does the NHS not want minor ailments rocking up unnecessarily to the GP, they want the population to avoid the use of antibiotics.  I don't see any comment about what honey varietal, so once again non Manuka is recognised as a health remedy.

 

Honey has also been used as a sleeping remedy for thousands of years.  

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All honeys have the hydrogen peroxide effect.  And for many types of healing, that is enough, when combined with the hygroscopic effect of the honey on the wound.  That hygroscopicity (sorry - I just had to structure the sentence so I can use that word...) is what helps to keep the wound moist.  I clearly recall Peter Molan describing this aspect.  And then he followed up with a sudden, jarring photo of using honey for mastitis and other absolutely 'uhhh...' inspiring slides.  He was a delight to listen to, for sure.  You came away believing in the powers of honey, and manuka honey, in healing.  But also with some images that still disturb my mind...

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1 hour ago, NickWallingford said:

All honeys have the hydrogen peroxide effect.  And for many types of healing, that is enough, when combined with the hygroscopic effect of the honey on the wound.  That hygroscopicity (sorry - I just had to structure the sentence so I can use that word...) is what helps to keep the wound moist.  I clearly recall Peter Molan describing this aspect.  And then he followed up with a sudden, jarring photo of using honey for mastitis and other absolutely 'uhhh...' inspiring slides.  He was a delight to listen to, for sure.  You came away believing in the powers of honey, and manuka honey, in healing.  But also with some images that still disturb my mind...

Manuka has a non-peroxide way of healing,.

When UMFA was doing work around trademark for Manuka they had to check other honeys for signature compounds they found manuka had approx 2300 different compounds, Kanuka about 1200, most were around 200-300 and clover about 100(clover has been mass bred for agriculture so perhaps some markers lost in breeding)

I understand and happy to be corrected that lepto scarparium (forgive my spelling) our manuka honey, has the non peroxide activity, but other lepto species plants do not.

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It's a shame that Cleopatra did not know about manuka honey & wound infection.  Maybe it would have saved the girl from an asp wound.

 

Reputedly (sorry folks can't provide any scientific evidence but all are welcome to google to see if it is supported by scientific evidence) Cleo like to bath in YOUNG donkeys' milk, honey & oil.  To the extent she always traveled with  young donkeys for their milk.

 

HEE HAW HEE HAW (- that's a donkey noise Bray Bray) Ha ha

 

 

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I have treated nasty infected looking small wounds with alternating , tea tree oil,  christaderm ( spelling ??) and garlic and manuka honey .

If you apply crushed garlic to the skin and put over a decent cloth sticking plaster it will blister up the skin .The you can apply honey to the open blistered skin .

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On 7/15/2020 at 5:14 PM, frazzledfozzle said:

My daughter Has a leg ulcer that’s being treated at the local doctors office.

I was pretty impressed when the nurse asked her if she would be OK with having Manuka honey put on it. 

 

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If the ulcer gets worse (I hope it does not) talk to your lawyer. The honey in your picture is table honey not medical grade honey. I’m really surprised your doctor is using table honey on open wounds....

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For myself I would use table grade in preference to medicinal Manuka and I would rate manuka comb honey as a bit better again.

It's not just the UMF factor that makes honey an effective wound dressing.

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12 hours ago, john berry said:

For myself I would use table grade in preference to medicinal Manuka and I would rate manuka comb honey as a bit better again.

It's not just the UMF factor that makes honey an effective wound dressing.


We have been using our own Sample honey as a dressing and we are very happy with the results :) 

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