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Comvita committed to propolis despite plant closure


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Its Nelson plant is no more but honey producer Comvita says it is committed to continuing its propolis production in the North Island.

Comvita closed its ethanol extraction plant at Brightwater in March due to "considerable investment" required to keep functioning.

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I.STUFF.CO.NZ

Its Nelson plant is no more but Comvita says it is committed to...

 

 

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It seems to me a lot of acquisitions Comvita has made over the past 10 years or so haven’t stayed around long before being closed or written down to next to nothing .   Must be great to have

I wish as a NZ consumer I could pay “ world price” for butter and lamb.

Undersupply helps keep prices up and is way better than oversupply. I have no idea what this foreign propolis is like, it might be fantastic stuff which makes you wonder why they can't sell under thei

15 minutes ago, Maru Hoani said:

I just hope our government stops the import of all bee products, we can produce more than we need so why not make it illegal to bring more in!

 

We sell much, much more propolis than NZ produces despite all the buyers efforts and financial inducements to stimulate NZ beeks to produce more. 

Would NZ beeks produce/sell for the costs overseas producers do?

Non Manuka beekeepers are getting close to international honey prices, to get to international propolis prices would need a similar reduction in sales prices.

 

There are apiarists overseas who specialise in propolis production, like you specialise in honey production. 

They get paid so little for honey that they get paid more for producing propolis.

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1 hour ago, Rob's BP said:

 

We sell much, much more propolis than NZ produces despite all the buyers efforts and financial inducements to stimulate NZ beeks to produce more. 

 

 

At the moment New Zealand beekeepers are producing far more propolis than they can sell. Cheap imports, repackaged and sent overseas in misleading packaging have destroyed the New Zealand propolis market. 

Contains local and overseas ingredients. I wonder what the local ingredient is because it sure ain't any of my propolis.

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13 hours ago, Rob's BP said:

 

We sell much, much more propolis than NZ produces despite all the buyers efforts and financial inducements to stimulate NZ beeks to produce more. 

Would NZ beeks produce/sell for the costs overseas producers do?

Non Manuka beekeepers are getting close to international honey prices, to get to international propolis prices would need a similar reduction in sales prices.

 

There are apiarists overseas who specialise in propolis production, like you specialise in honey production. 

They get paid so little for honey that they get paid more for producing propolis.

Come on Rob. Unless you produce propolis and then try to sell it you can't really say what you did. John's entirely correct. Last seasons propolis took some time to sell, and others on this forum are stopping propolis production. Because of lack of demand. Because we're getting screwed by imports.

 

And, you want me to sell our products at overseas prices. If I can sell my pasture at all! 

Geez, makes me mad. You speak of these things as a blasted Honey Marketer. And we depend on you Marketers to drive us forward.

Is this the Marketers attitude in general? 

Do you sell a pasture product? Probably not.

 

 

 

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12 hours ago, john berry said:

At the moment New Zealand beekeepers are producing far more propolis than they can sell. Cheap imports, repackaged and sent overseas in misleading packaging have destroyed the New Zealand propolis market. 

Contains local and overseas ingredients. I wonder what the local ingredient is because it sure ain't any of my propolis.

The air in the top of the bottle is NZ air I think

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15 hours ago, Maru Hoani said:

I just hope our government stops the import of all bee products, we can produce more than we need so why not make it illegal to bring more in!

 

Yes, it would be nice from a marketing point of view.  But ultimately if bee products were to be banned from import, it would need to be on sanitary/phytosanitary grounds.  We would need to show that any import would pose an unacceptable risk to the health of our bees. 

 

Pricing?  I'm always amazed when any prices achieved are more than the world price.  And to maintain that premium price would take (as someone else said) a good "story", and a lot of on-going work...

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1 hour ago, NickWallingford said:

 

Yes, it would be nice from a marketing point of view.  But ultimately if bee products were to be banned from import, it would need to be on sanitary/phytosanitary grounds.  We would need to show that any import would pose an unacceptable risk to the health of our bees. 

 

Pricing?  I'm always amazed when any prices achieved are more than the world price.  And to maintain that premium price would take (as someone else said) a good "story", and a lot of on-going work...


I wish as a NZ consumer I could pay “ world price” for butter and lamb.

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19 hours ago, Rob's BP said:

 

We sell much, much more propolis than NZ produces despite all the buyers efforts and financial inducements to stimulate NZ beeks to produce more. 

Would NZ beeks produce/sell for the costs overseas producers do?

Non Manuka beekeepers are getting close to international honey prices, to get to international propolis prices would need a similar reduction in sales prices.

 

There are apiarists overseas who specialise in propolis production, like you specialise in honey production. 

They get paid so little for honey that they get paid more for producing propolis.

Do we? I was told by my buyer that they weren't purchasing anymore, I would still to it for less but for wax moth no thanks.

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8 hours ago, NickWallingford said:

 

Yes, it would be nice from a marketing point of view.  But ultimately if bee products were to be banned from import, it would need to be on sanitary/phytosanitary grounds.  We would need to show that any import would pose an unacceptable risk to the health of our bees. 

 

are you sure it is only on sanitary/?sanitary grounds? that seems pretty narrow.

 

I guess there is going to be a problem in the pork industry where they intend to bring in animal welfare rules for NZ pork producers but overseas ones may not comply to the same rules. 

My view would be that it is fine to introduce those new laws based on good reasons but only provided that pork imported to NZ is proven to also comply to the same rules. That could effectively ban all Pork imports by default if nobody can be bothered to prove the provinence of their pork in the international market. I hope that NZ Inc can stand up for itself. Besides, while I don't eat much pork, I must say that I like bacon.

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1 minute ago, ChrisM said:

I guess there is going to be a problem in the pork industry where they intend to bring in animal welfare rules for NZ pork producers but overseas ones may not comply to the same rules. 

 

Besides, while I don't eat much pork, I must say that I like bacon.

problem already exists.

I love bacon, but only buy bacon made from pigs grown in NZ = gets rid of most of the options in the supermarket. Bacon from NZ-grown pigs is approximately three times the price of the stuff processed from imported ingredients. Means that i rarely eat bacon...

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11 hours ago, Gino de Graaf said:

Come on Rob. Unless you produce propolis and then try to sell it you can't really say what you did. John's entirely correct. Last seasons propolis took some time to sell, and others on this forum are stopping propolis production. Because of lack of demand. Because we're getting screwed by imports.

 

Maybe if you looked back to the past, when and why decisions to import were made, you would see why we have the present situation. 

I know there was frustration for about a decade of not getting enough propolis from NZ beeks to satisfy overseas demand. The companies tried all things to get beeks to produce propolis. Most beeks saw it as a nuisance, undesirable, a hassle, a skin allergenic, not worth their time, something they might only do when they had nothing else to do, especially when they were making so much from 'manuka'. 

Buyers eventually had no other option from volume and cost basis to legally import, add cost and value here before selling. 

 

And now that these supply chains are set up and working well, NZ beeks neeed to sell propolis...

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11 hours ago, Dennis Crowley said:

The air in the top of the bottle is NZ air I think

 

That's pretty correct in the case of one NZ base and owned company (since sold completely to offshore interests). 

We were competing against them hard and frustrated by their lower pricing, retailer deals, and NZ branding. 

We tested their product and found it was Chinese origin. 

I asked their CEO/owner about it, and he said "yes, it has NZ orgin. I have a beehive in my garden and the propolis from that goes into our products"!

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I have a meeting next week with a man who sells poplar poles. They are $10.80 each. Seeing as we are no longer allowed to graze 19 ha of creek bed I thought I'd plant poplars .... for the bees to make propolis from and claim carbon credits.

A win win situation....... except that E Can regs state no planting within 20m of the waterway , so that's a 40 metre no plant zone ..... so over a  3k length of creek the equals to 12 ha ( I think) .....

No wonder Tod Muller resigned !

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1 hour ago, Rob's BP said:

 

Maybe if you looked back to the past, when and why decisions to import were made, you would see why we have the present situation. 

I know there was frustration for about a decade of not getting enough propolis from NZ beeks to satisfy overseas demand. The companies tried all things to get beeks to produce propolis. Most beeks saw it as a nuisance, undesirable, a hassle, a skin allergenic, not worth their time, something they might only do when they had nothing else to do, especially when they were making so much from 'manuka'. 

Buyers eventually had no other option from volume and cost basis to legally import, add cost and value here before selling. 

 

And now that these supply chains are set up and working well, NZ beeks neeed to sell propolis...

Don't lump me in with easy street M producers. Been scraping it for decades.

Do you know how cheap the imported propolis is? We haven't got a chance.

You're a Marketer, looking at it from easy supply chain point of view. 

We're getting our chain yanked. Pasture and propolis. Are you selling pasture at all? Or the covetted M only? 

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9 minutes ago, Gino de Graaf said:

Don't lump me in with easy street M producers. Been scraping it for decades.

Do you know how cheap the imported propolis is? We haven't got a chance.

You're a Marketer, looking at it from easy supply chain point of view. 

We're getting our chain yanked. Pasture and propolis. Are you selling pasture at all? Or the covetted M only? 

Disconnect the chain .

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10 hours ago, jamesc said:

Disconnect the chain .

How? 

You're been trying and it sounds bloody hard. I don't have the resources to do it. I depend on Buyers and Marketers to work With me. The comments by Rob erk me greatly. Shows a great deal of disconnect. 

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12 hours ago, Gino de Graaf said:

Maybe if you looked back to the past, when and why decisions to import were made, you would see why we have the present situation. 

I know there was frustration for about a decade of not getting enough propolis from NZ beeks to satisfy overseas demand. The companies tried all things to get beeks to produce propolis. Most beeks saw it as a nuisance, undesirable, a hassle, a skin allergenic, not worth their time, something they might only do when they had nothing else to do, especially when they were making so much from 'manuka'. 

Buyers eventually had no other option from volume and cost basis to legally import, add cost and value here before selling. 

 

And now that these supply chains are set up and working well, NZ beeks neeed to sell propolis...

The reason years ago prob why you couldn't get enough propolis could prob be due to lower hive numbers in NZ.  M has only been the go to honey after 2007, so you can't use manuka as an excuse there.   

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19 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

The reason years ago prob why you couldn't get enough propolis could prob be due to lower hive numbers in NZ.  M has only been the go to honey after 2007, so you can't use manuka as an excuse there.   

Good point. I also remember propolis been bought at a much lower rate in 2007. 

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Undersupply helps keep prices up and is way better than oversupply. I have no idea what this foreign propolis is like, it might be fantastic stuff which makes you wonder why they can't sell under their own country's name. Hopefully one day a reporter will look into the entire beekeeping industry in New Zealand and I for one will be quite happy to name and shame those who deserve it. Just because something is legal  doesn't mean you should do it.

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