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10 minutes ago, frazzledfozzle said:


When we used the staples in Winter our hives were exactly like yours really damp and the poor ones never recovered.

This Autumn we reverted back to Bayvarol and the hives are looking awesome.

Fantastic.

Pleased to hear it 😉😊

 

 

 

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Had a couple of pallets get washed away😮 Had to wait until the water went town to rescue them, highest it's been for years

Done 51 hives today, only one mite wash that came back with nill mites from a 350 bee sample then back home for a tutu on my new mean machine, just gotta set up the dualies then off for a test run, st

-4c outside... but I think we having HotDogs for linch.

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50 minutes ago, M4tt said:

 

The Old staples still have OA in them , but to be honest , the hives are damp , which is odd with a dryish winter and ventilated bases .  Nothing goes well in damp hives .

 

Yea I have a few damp ones too, they get that slime on the inside of the box, feels so good tidying them up. We had a lot less nor west wind this winter with plenty of sub zero nights and single digit days.. bees look ok with plenty of tucker on board though and will get stuck into a first round in another week or so.

Sounds like you have plenty of good ones there to patch up the others... 

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I had a group of beekeeping students from the EIT come around yesterday so I broke one of my own rules and opened up a couple of hives to show them. They actually had a little bit of fresh honey coming in and the stronger one even had a small patch of drone brood.

 

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10 minutes ago, john berry said:

I had a group of beekeeping students from the EIT come around yesterday so I broke one of my own rules and opened up a couple of hives to show them. They actually had a little bit of fresh honey coming in and the stronger one even had a small patch of drone brood.

 

Sounds like you will have sexually active drones to mate with your first lot of spring virgins

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16 minutes ago, john berry said:

and the stronger one even had a small patch of drone brood.

 

4 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

Sounds like you will have sexually active drones to mate with your first lot of spring virgins

Please explain.  How does having a bit of drone brood translate to having sexually active drones.

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On 7/27/2020 at 8:11 PM, M4tt said:

Last winter I was in them all the way through monitoring and adjusting and they came through well following the brood with staples .

 

This time I wanted a comparison . The few hives I have now I’m happy to experiment .

 

The Old staples still have OA in them , but to be honest , the hives are damp , which is odd with a dryish winter and ventilated bases .  Nothing goes well in damp hives .

 

So now I really know . Leaving them alone through winter is high risk .

2/3rds would be in pretty good shape , but the poor ones are poor 

Equalise them in a few months, that way you don't get swarms and the weaker ones get back up to strength

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8 hours ago, john berry said:

There are hundreds of corporate hives within flying distance these days so I hope it is eucalypt that my bees are getting and not robbing out deadouts . It happened last year here and I am well within the red zone.

I hope so to, had a local beekeeper here a few years ago now, came to me and mention one of his sites were bringing in a late flow that he could not figure what it was. They were robbing out a shed a couple of kms away of AFB honey and he ended up burning 40 hives. We found the shed and it was a new beek who didn't know what AFB was.

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I might have told the story before .

 

The biggest crop I ever got was when I was working for Arthur. We were running something like 1400 hives. I was chief slave taking honey off, while Arthur and his mates were in charge of extracting.  Back then he had  a steam hand knife and two galvanised four frame extractors that sat up on wooden stands and gravity fed the honey into a sump via white plastic rainwater pipe.

The average age in the extracting room was a little under seventy.

The honey was coming off thick and fast, so I started storing it in and old woolshed just out of Hororata.

I had a yard of 24 bee hives just down the road.

Best year ever that one.

 

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Bumped into my mate the cocky while signing out at the yard today, 

usual yarns... been pretty cold huh? .. how are the bees looking?.. Bit of fresh pig rooting out in that new grass paddock.. hows the new worker/tractor/drill? ... what are the bees on at the moment?..  then he says..”Jeez you gotta be crazy to be a beekeeper, man what an industry to try and beat a living out of”

I laughed.. then agreed and kicked a stone around on the ground for a bit. 

 

Sums my day up really, realising I am a tad bit crazy almost made me smile as much as flicking a few lids off for a peek at the girls.. 

 

 

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Agreed @Stoney .

 

The interesting thing about your comment is that those' looking in' on the industry can see broad as day light that all is not well, while those within are too busy with  their blinkers on, head sdown and don't want to see.

The other interesting thing is that when you meet people within the industry who comment and confirm my view that some of our Hierarchy who purport to run the show lack the vision to propel us into the 21 century ....  I do wonder what the future holds.

 

Having said that, I had my palm read by a Sadhu in Kathmandu a while ago.   He saw a long and prosperous life, so we live in hope!

 

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12 minutes ago, jamesc said:

 so we live in hope!

 

@jamesc I recon your collection of words quoted above pretty much sums it up.. 

some, including myself call it gambling or playing poker but whatever your views on it I think it all boils down to that burning optimistic thought... what will next season bring? 

That and of course the buzz of working frame fulls of shiny healthy bees as mr bellbird sings his song. 

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I had a dream

I lived in hope

That those who tread the narrow way

With hive tool and smoker through the day

Would find recompense for labours of love

Filtered down from up above

By players devoid of greed

Who filtered down their spoils to those in need.

 

More Tea Vicar ?

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I think a lot of us are living in hope.

we haven’t sold any honey at all this year and can only hope for a bust in the harvest for a lot of Manuka producers up north this year .

 

its pretty bad when you wish for others bad fortune to boost your own :( 

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On one hand we have various packers saying how wonderful their manuka sales are and on the other we have huge amounts of manuka that hItasn't been sold . You have to wonder how much of it is hype to keep their bankers happy because in the real world of beekeeping you don't see much sign of it.

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speaking of packers (and/or top bar hives, politics, glysophate and the management agency), has anyone heard of Godwin's Law?

It is worth looking it up, I've only just found it and it is hilarious but sadly true.

Sort of implies nothing good will ever come of social media discussions on what is wrong with the world. So, we should try to talk about something else.

Meanwhile Grant tried to set up a market place thingy that could take on the supermarkets if it had critical mass and there has been a huge rush of .... hardly anyone.

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1 hour ago, john berry said:

On one hand we have various packers saying how wonderful their manuka sales are and on the other we have huge amounts of manuka that hItasn't been sold . You have to wonder how much of it is hype to keep their bankers happy because in the real world of beekeeping you don't see much sign of it.


I was beginning to think I was imaging things so am pleased someone else has the same thoughts :) 

I’d even gone so far as thinking we couldn’t sell our honey because I can be a bit outspoken at times here on the forum and it was payback.
 

Lol desperate times bring on all sorts of weird thinking 

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1 hour ago, frazzledfozzle said:


I was beginning to think I was imaging things so am pleased someone else has the same thoughts :) 

I’d even gone so far as thinking we couldn’t sell our honey because I can be a bit outspoken at times here on the forum and it was payback.
 

Lol desperate times bring on all sorts of weird thinking 

True, I have that vibe also. 

Like you shouldn't say anything cause the buyer won't support you.

2 hours ago, ChrisM said:

speaking of packers (and/or top bar hives, politics, glysophate and the management agency), has anyone heard of Godwin's Law?

It is worth looking it up, I've only just found it and it is hilarious but sadly true.

Sort of implies nothing good will ever come of social media discussions on what is wrong with the world. So, we should try to talk about something else.

Meanwhile Grant tried to set up a market place thingy that could take on the supermarkets if it had critical mass and there has been a huge rush of .... hardly anyone.

I don't expect this forum to solve issues. But it's a place to begin and continue discussions. A sharing thoughts platform. 

I wonder how many commercial beekeepers view and participate? 

Maybe half of the posts are semi, hobbyists? Don't misunderstand me, it's a place for everyone, but I relate much closer to commercial operators.

 

 

 

 

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11 minutes ago, Gino de Graaf said:

 

I don't expect this forum to solve issues. But it's a place to begin and continue discussions. A sharing thoughts platform. 

I wonder how many commercial beekeepers view and participate? 

Maybe half of the posts are semi, hobbyists? Don't misunderstand me, it's a place for everyone, but I relate much closer to commercial operators.

 

 

 

 

 

I know there's a lot of commercials that lurk here which is a real shame because most of them would have a lot to offer to all of us in our everyday forum postings.

It's the same old same old that post with very few members speaking up . 

For me I would just like to understand what's happening in the market place we are hanging in there under the assumption right or wrong that things will improve .

So many rumours so many people who cant sell manuka honey so many press articles saying business is booming.

 

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1 hour ago, Gino de Graaf said:

I don't expect this forum to solve issues. But it's a place to begin and continue discussions. A sharing thoughts platform. 

agreed. but did you look up Godwin's Law and how this can end up unintentionally distorting things if we're not careful?

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1 hour ago, ChrisM said:

agreed. but did you look up Godwin's Law and how this can end up unintentionally distorting things if we're not careful?

Had a look, the discussion ends in someone being called a Nazi/Hitler.

Not distorted? More like stopped

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3 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

 

I know there's a lot of commercials that lurk here which is a real shame because most of them would have a lot to offer to all of us in our everyday forum postings.

It's the same old same old that post with very few members speaking up . 

For me I would just like to understand what's happening in the market place we are hanging in there under the assumption right or wrong that things will improve .

So many rumours so many people who cant sell manuka honey so many press articles saying business is booming.

 

For what it's worth , cashflow is very tight here at the moment.

The Missus is pressuring for us to sell the bees as she is not interested in paying wages this year. My comment was that I would get very bored  with nothing to do. And what about Main Man whose young boy wants to be a Beekeeper ?

I bought a bag of O/A yesterday to resoak gib tape staples as we can't afford the Bayvarol.

 

We have NEVER been in a situation like this before.

 

On the flip side, we have honey samples up in Asia and are waiting.  We have been waiting for two years for an answer out of  Hong Kong.

 

It disappoints and frustrates  me when local  marketers offer $4.00/kg citing there is a limited market and no room for manoeuvring.  What a load of codswallop.  I suspect they really don't care what the producer return  is, they just whack on their dollar or two dollar margin and what we make is of no consequence.

If the market for Dew is limited, then please explain why during Covid lockdown the phone was red-hot with people wanting to buy Honey Dew, from the  three quarters of the globe.

 

I could go on, but I'll leave that til tomorrow after I've sought counsel with my Doctor.

 

 

 

 

 

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9 minutes ago, jamesc said:

And what about Main Man whose young boy wants to be a Beekeeper ?

Tell him to go be a plumber or drainlayer or electrician.

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