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Had a couple of pallets get washed awayūüėģ Had to wait until the water went town to rescue them, highest it's been for years

Done 51 hives today, only one mite wash that came back with nill mites from a 350 bee sample then back home for a tutu on my new mean machine, just gotta set up the dualies then off for a test run, st

-4c outside... but I think we having HotDogs for linch.

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11 minutes ago, Maru Hoani said:

 

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Feel for you, I lost a 100 hives to flooding two weeks before Kiwi Pollination. Mine were near a river but the rain was in the hills and a flash flood came down and took them all out. Found pallets and hives 6-7 feet high in trees. Saved 20 the rest were lost out to sea.

 

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I'm very sorry about your hives and the flood. 

 

Just to change the subject, we haven't had a mud chains post for a while....

How about ozzie bog out setup. not really mud chains, but they look handy once you're stuck.

There are multiple videos with the end of the 'ladder' loose, tied off and pegged and they all look plausible (?).

cost appears to be AUD$269 plus post for a pair.

they could be worthwhile for all the numpties who get stuck on Papamoa beach with an incoming tide.

 

 

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5 hours ago, Maru Hoani said:

Had a couple of pallets get washed awayūüėģ

Had to wait until the water went town to rescue them, highest it's been for yearsreceived_938747436549025.thumb.jpeg.7e27aee7b311025fbfb1009df35398d4.jpeg

 

Arohamai.  We lost hives like that years ago,  devastating when you open them up and they are filled with mud, dead and alive bees.  Take a mate with you better than going on your own.

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7 hours ago, Maru Hoani said:

Had a couple of pallets get washed awayūüėģ

Had to wait until the water went town to rescue them, highest it's been for yearsreceived_938747436549025.thumb.jpeg.7e27aee7b311025fbfb1009df35398d4.jpeg

when the north has had a big winter wet before how has that influenced the spring and summer flowering.

the water tables must be pretty high now.

will that be a good thing for the next season .

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4 hours ago, ChrisM said:

I'm very sorry about your hives and the flood. 

 

Just to change the subject, we haven't had a mud chains post for a while....

How about ozzie bog out setup. not really mud chains, but they look handy once you're stuck.

There are multiple videos with the end of the 'ladder' loose, tied off and pegged and they all look plausible (?).

cost appears to be AUD$269 plus post for a pair.

they could be worthwhile for all the numpties who get stuck on Papamoa beach with an incoming tide.

 

 

simple problem is you need something to anchor to and often stuff is not lined up right for the vehicle. 

tho on sand the old bury the spare tire can work. as can some of the ground anchors.

i think with that style of recovery a land anchor is a good choice as it tends to pull it into the ground as you drive over the straps.

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I have had hives survive floods before. It doesn't do them any good but they can recover. If the water was clean then you shouldn't have too many problems but if it was full of silt then you will have to replace those combs that have been underwater. Bees can clean up a lot of things but silt isn't one of them. I guess if you have plastic frames you could water blast them but about all you could do with wood and wax was burn them. Personally I would leave them alone for at least a couple of weeks to dry out a bit and then sort through them. 

I know what it's like to have hives flooded and it's no fun.

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On 7/17/2020 at 11:37 AM, Maggie James said:
On 7/17/2020 at 11:10 AM, jamesc said:

tutorial .... is now the time to be giving the cell builders a bit of a syrup sweetener ...?

Aye, aye James - your're on the money.  I need to get out & do likewise.  


Do you use internal feeders or top feeders at this time of year? Just thinking that the girls might not be too keen to climb upstairs with these temperatures...

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The grass is growing in this gully .... wattle flowering down at West melton ..... we use top feeders ....dribble in a litre of very light syrup for the next few days ..... you'll soon know if they are keen to take it down.

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It will lift upto 500kg but I only put enough balist weights on the back(100kg 4x 24kg weights) to do 300kg comfortably to save on weight, the machine itself weighs 980kg then the forks and weights maybe 270kg so around 1200kg all up, it lifts quite high, I got the extended mast as it was only 25kg heavier, probly could stack 3 pallets high, diesel 38hp

It has 7 inches clearance off the ground,4x4 and diff lock 25km speed and independent front brakes.

My mite washes have been coming back between 0 and 2 from 350 bees from site to site(but have done a bit of ox vaporizing with a provap 220), everything's brooding up now, upto 4 frames of capped brood so I'm putting in some bayvarol to guarantee them for the manuka flow in 2 months.

 

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Winter is over . It’s bee time again ........

 

 

25 hives inspected and had staples pulled and replaced . This year using the @Stoney placement method and set and forget . Have not been in them since Feb, which was a high risk strategy , but I wanted to give it a go. 

 

5 dead outs 

Anywhere there was drone brood there is varroa 

More than enough DWV 
 

There are some healthy hives amongst them 

 

So a fairly underwhelming start and back to the results we used to get with chemical strips .

 

 

Looks like we haven’t found the silver bullet yet . If they don’t shake the problems over the next month I might have to rethink my strategy 

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Yep.... We are getting primed for another season....

Today was Ladies day, running dogs around some dodgy boxes.

We ended up with 108 boxes destined for incineration in the big hole.

822CFB2F-002D-4544-93CF-00507C09647C.jpeg

8E7B9F6F-4B6B-43A1-9688-02903979A216.jpeg

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51 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Yep.... We are getting primed for another season....

Today was Ladies day, running dogs around some dodgy boxes.

We ended up with 108 boxes destined for incineration in the big hole.

822CFB2F-002D-4544-93CF-00507C09647C.jpeg

8E7B9F6F-4B6B-43A1-9688-02903979A216.jpeg

Atleast they're not rotting out on you like the thermos I'm doing, had 5 in a site today, I'm putting paraffin waxed ones out.

Only another 300 to change over in the next few seasons.

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Hey @M4tt what was the reasoning with leaving them alone for 5-6 months? 

Doesnt sound too good at all. 

 

Ive got my good woman with me in the ute for a couple of months.. have opened a few lighter hives up today for a looksie and getting her accustomed to what goes on under the lid, still very cold here til late morning, bees very active through midday, most queens have awoken with fresh bands of eggs around the capped brood curve, I’ll be looking to add the first OX treatment about mid August. 

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36 minutes ago, Stoney said:

Hey @M4tt what was the reasoning with leaving them alone for 5-6 months? 

Doesnt sound too good at all. 

 

Ive got my good woman with me in the ute for a couple of months.. have opened a few lighter hives up today for a looksie and getting her accustomed to what goes on under the lid, still very cold here til late morning, bees very active through midday, most queens have awoken with fresh bands of eggs around the capped brood curve, I’ll be looking to add the first OX treatment about mid August. 

Last winter I was in them all the way through monitoring and adjusting and they came through well following the brood with staples .

 

This time I wanted a comparison . The few hives I have now I’m happy to experiment .

 

The Old staples still have OA in them , but to be honest , the hives are damp , which is odd with a dryish winter and ventilated bases .  Nothing goes well in damp hives .

 

So now I really know . Leaving them alone through winter is high risk .

2/3rds would be in pretty good shape , but the poor ones are poor 

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9 minutes ago, M4tt said:

 

The Old staples still have OA in them , but to be honest , the hives are damp , which is odd with a dryish winter and ventilated bases .  Nothing goes well in damp hives .

 

So now I really know . Leaving them alone through winter is high risk .

2/3rds would be in pretty good shape , but the poor ones are poor 


When we used the staples in Winter our hives were exactly like yours really damp and the poor ones never recovered.

This Autumn we reverted back to Bayvarol and the hives are looking awesome.

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