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On 7/5/2020 at 11:20 AM, Don Mac said:

There is a lot of money being invested in goat and sheeps milk.

Local goat farm, milks 3000 will double production this spring - have built another 3000 goat operation almost next door to the first farm.

And a friend is building a brand new dedicated sheep milking  and plans on milking 800 ewes this spring, so long as he finishes the milking shed.

It is his second year of operation and the returns out perform dairy cows....

Do you know if this milk is mostly going into cheese production? I have tried raw goat's milk, it tasted like lit would make great cheese, but I would never want to put it in my coffee.

Does sheep's milk taste similar? Dennis says about putting sheep's milk in coffee, in that case maybe the taste is completely different?

 

Back to honey.. Still lots of people on social media talking about wholesale drum honey down to $2.80/kg Still seems to me it should be put into 500g pots and sold at $15/kg. Yet at the same time, lots of beekeepers are still looking to sell honey at over $25/kg using 250g containers. I don't know if they are actually getting a lot of sales but I presume those beekeepers are actually doing damage by reducing volumes as opposed to if they were all selling at $15/kg and largely speaking footing it with supermarkets.

 

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52 minutes ago, ChrisM said:

wholesale drum honey down to $2.80/kg

Does this include GST, the drum & freight?  

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6 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

Does this include GST, the drum & freight?  

does it make any difference; still well below cost of production for most people?

I suspect ex-works excl GST, as for the drum probably included. The $2.80 figure came up in social media so it could be totally false, but we've already discussed prices of $3.50/kg in various forum threads so it does not seem far fetched. Pretty sad really.

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9 minutes ago, ChrisM said:

does it make any difference; still well below cost of production for most people?

I suspect ex-works excl GST, as for the drum probably included. The $2.80 figure came up in social media so it could be totally false, but we've already discussed prices of $3.50/kg in various forum threads so it does not seem far fetched. Pretty sad really.

I don't think I have discussed any prices.

 

I am well aware it is not fantastic, but if you are dealing in large volumes of honey - drum, plus GST, plus freight is a very big difference.  Also if you are in a position to ride this dreadful industry scenario out, covering costs is a major in keeping your head above water.  

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Seems like I’m not the only one Dreaming Big.

This report out of Aucklands KoiTu is interesting.

The next step is a ‘How to’ plan.

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On 7/6/2020 at 1:19 PM, john berry said:

And they say marketers have no souls.

Sorry Adam it was not meant to be harsh. It was intended as a wry comment on the difference between beekeeper dreamers and marketing realists.

I tend to side with the beekeeper dreamers but I have been round for a while and understand that the price you can get for export honey basically sets the price for local honey. I also know that 10 new brands on the market doesn't mean 10 times as much honey sold. It just means someone gains some sales and someone loses them. The other thing that seems perennial in marketing is that producer packers do everything they can to maintain the price of honey at sustainable levels while some packers(Not all) are more than happy to buy honey as cheaply as possible for short-term gain without a thought for the long-term damage.

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3 hours ago, ChrisM said:

Do you know if this milk is mostly going into cheese production? I have tried raw goat's milk, it tasted like lit would make great cheese, but I would never want to put it in my coffee.

Does sheep's milk taste similar? Dennis says about putting sheep's milk in coffee, in that case maybe the taste is completely different?

 

Back to honey.. Still lots of people on social media talking about wholesale drum honey down to $2.80/kg Still seems to me it should be put into 500g pots and sold at $15/kg. Yet at the same time, lots of beekeepers are still looking to sell honey at over $25/kg using 250g containers. I don't know if they are actually getting a lot of sales but I presume those beekeepers are actually doing damage by reducing volumes as opposed to if they were all selling at $15/kg and largely speaking footing it with supermarkets.

 

 @ChrisM all sheep and goat milk is A2. These farms are supplying driers that convert the milk to powder and incorporate in infant formula.

  • Good Info 2

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On 7/7/2020 at 8:02 PM, john berry said:

Sorry Adam it was not meant to be harsh. It was intended as a wry comment on the difference between beekeeper dreamers and marketing realists.

I tend to side with the beekeeper dreamers but I have been round for a while and understand that the price you can get for export honey basically sets the price for local honey. I also know that 10 new brands on the market doesn't mean 10 times as much honey sold. It just means someone gains some sales and someone loses them. The other thing that seems perennial in marketing is that producer packers do everything they can to maintain the price of honey at sustainable levels while some packers(Not all) are more than happy to buy honey as cheaply as possible for short-term gain without a thought for the long-term damage.

Hi John. I was jesting. I know exactly where you are coming from. You are correct about '10 new Brands' unless those brands deliver something unique enough to drive growth in the category then the value is simply diluted. What usually happens is that 9 of the 10 new brands cannot gain traction and simply drop price to move the product. The knock on effect is that price pressure then gets pushed onto the established volume brands and the whole market gets driven down. Unfortunately your shorter term approach scenario is quite prolific.

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