Jump to content

Recommended Posts

49 minutes ago, CHCHPaul said:


What do they do with the honey that fails?

Doug Briscoe was a beekeeping advisor for the Dept of Agric.  I knew him when he was based in Tauranga, in the late 1970s/early 1980s (by then, Min of Agric).

 

He said that given that he was responsible for the areas where tutin might be found in honey, he felt sort of obliged to have a taste of some (confirmed by others' illness!) to see if the effects were as bad as it was described.

 

He said it was about the worst sick he had ever been, lasting a day or more.  Never again, he said.

 

I don't think I would have had the nerve to do that...

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 197
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Finally my boys big enough to help do a job😁 one less thing for me to do, he smokes my hive I'm working then moves ahead of me smoking and he's really keen too, proud daddy moment

Maggie came up today to prep for her queen raising tutorial ....to be followed by a get together with whoever feels the urge to come out and chew the fat over some wild pork slow cooked on the spit.

We are told you are always never too old to learn. I never really appreciated that saying til yesterday when I attended Maggie's Queen tutoring session.   Thanks Maggie .  ..... insight

Posted Images

I copped a load of tutin honey on my toast a few years ago. Tried it again to make sure I wasn't imagining things. Now always  taste test my harvest. 

Edited by yesbut
Link to post
Share on other sites

For many years, it was said that tutin poisoning would only really happen with comb honey, with the active ingredient sometimes confined to only a few cells.  One story of four people sitting around a table, eating from some comb honey.  Two on one side got violently ill, the others were not affected.

 

While there was a claim that any tutin in extracted honey would be so 'watered down' that it would not make people sick, there was also the claim that the honey may not be thoroughly blended enough to reduce the risk, that there could potentially be 'pockets' of the honey that might have a higher level of tutin still...

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, CHCHPaul said:


What do they do with the honey that fails?

I have yet to find out . . Feed it back to bees.

There are lots of pollination hives in this area.

Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, yesbut said:

I copped a load of tutin honey on my toast a few years ago. Tried it again to make sure I wasn't imagining things. Now always  taste test my harvest. 

Did you get very sick .

Does the honey have a distinct flavour ?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I felt a bit strange & very dizzy, had to lie down. Effect disappeared after about 10 minutes. After I put it up on here a few years ago, the powers that be wanted me to send them the jar so they could relate the tutin level to the affect it had on me. Sadly for them I had already binned it. No flavour out of the ordinary. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, CHCHPaul said:

What do they do with the honey that fails?

The solution to the pollution is dilution.

So, you mix it with other honey until it passes. If you have a failed result of 0.80 and mix it with an equal amount of honey that has no Tutin detected then the combined result will pass if well mixed. 

 

We had anticipated a really bad year for Tutin in Tauranga, but testing results publically visible on the map show this was not the case.

As the person in the BoP Group who was consolidating specimens into groups of five and sending them to the Lab I have spent more time than most looking at test results. We had quite a lot of tests that gave a measured level of Tutin (as opposed to nothing able to be measured <0.01). So, it is reasonable to say that Tutin levels were far higher in our catchment. 

 

As I understand it Tutin is a neurotoxin. If you are poisoned and you don't die, there is a good chance of permanent and lasting brain damage. It is not to be messed about with. However, so far as I know there is not yet a single recorded instance of extracted honey ever resulting in the above. Whereas dealing with comb honey is a lot more tricky if you happen to taste a 'landmine'. So far we have not yet recorded a single Tutin fail within urban boundaries for hobbyists in our local catchment; as shown on the Group's tutin map. Nearly everyone gives permission for their test results to be mapped. However, even those few who don't haven't had a fail.

  • Like 1
  • Good Info 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, yesbut said:

I felt a bit strange & very dizzy, had to lie down. Effect disappeared after about 10 minutes. After I put it up on here a few years ago, the powers that be wanted me to send them the jar so they could relate the tutin level to the affect it had on me. Sadly for them I had already binned it. No flavour out of the ordinary. 


I remember that conversation/ thread 😇

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to extract my honey frame by frame and keep it unblended which would give all the problems of comb honey .

The honey from my place arrives in a 20 litre bucket blended , but all from here .

Down the coast there were fantastic  pure manuka crops .  Most of this honey came from more inland areas with scrubby manuka on sour pakahi soil , not tutu country.

Now that MPI has considered us a high risk area and honey has to be extracted early it will be problematic .

A lot of crops come late here .

I shall really have to think about the tutin issue now .

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

I shall really have to think about the tutin issue now .

 

It's not that hard. Observation is the key. Numbers of hoppers on the seven finger outside the bathroom window for example, vs the floral availability, drought.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, CHCHPaul said:


What do they do with the honey that fails?

 

Dispose of it or blend it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, NickWallingford said:

I don't think I would have had the nerve to do that..

That's when you invite the mother in law for a cup o tea and honey on toast.

You get brownie points for being kind to your her and maybe the honey will ..............

Edited by Dennis Crowley
  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, yesbut said:

It's not that hard. Observation is the key. Numbers of hoppers on the seven finger outside the bathroom window for example, vs the floral availability, drought.

not really any five finger here.

what other native have you seen them on that i should look at.?

Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

not really any five finger here.

SEVEN finger aka Pate aka Schefflera digitata.    Hoppers like grapes too

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, kaihoka said:

I like to extract my honey frame by frame and keep it unblended which would give all the problems of comb honey .

This is still quite different. If you extract a whole frame you are mixing and blending all the cells in that frame. 

If you have take a tsp of comb honey and put it on toast you are rolling the dice with a total of about 6 cells.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The current limit is set at 100 times lower than what would make you feel even slightly ill. The best solution if you have hives in a high-risk area is to take some scrape samples from each batch before extraction and if they are high then just save the honey for feed.

It's a real pain when companies extract from other people and one pallet of very high tutin  ends up mixed with the whole days extraction. Some contract extractors now make it the responsibility of the supplier and if you're not careful you can end up paying for massive losses. Blending is absolutely fine but only if the honey is something like 1.0   or 2.0  . I have heard of some samples coming back at 50 or 60 and it would just not be practical to try and blend that. Note that even at that level it should have no effect on anybody although I'm not sure I'd want to try. 

From what I've heard random scrape sampling tends to give a very similar test result as after final extraction.

  • Like 1
  • Good Info 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, kaihoka said:

I like to extract my honey frame by frame and keep it unblended which would give all the problems of comb honey .

The honey from my place arrives in a 20 litre bucket blended , but all from here .

Down the coast there were fantastic  pure manuka crops .  Most of this honey came from more inland areas with scrubby manuka on sour pakahi soil , not tutu country.

Now that MPI has considered us a high risk area and honey has to be extracted early it will be problematic .

A lot of crops come late here .

I shall really have to think about the tutin issue now .

 

All the honey I  take offf for other people comes in after December 31st. I tell them to get it tutin tested, whether they do or not who knows. I have never seen a vine hopper on the tutu plant in the Northern Westland area and the line goes from Fox River north.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Maggie came up today to prep for her queen raising tutorial ....to be followed by a get together with whoever feels the urge to come out and chew the fat over some wild pork slow cooked on the spit.

you just need to let Maggie know as we are still contact tracing.

For those who worry aboit such things... we spruced up the LongDrop. 
It’s a great place for a quiet chat.

B76907AA-1966-4BBA-893B-862D5102A02C.jpeg

874C1CF1-A1B9-4CFE-A15B-159BEB8E890A.jpeg

 

That's not Daniel Boone is it?

 

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, yesbut said:

SEVEN finger aka Pate aka Schefflera digitata.    Hoppers like grapes too

Thats pretty rare here too.

Lots of hoppers in the flax .

They breed in there

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...