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Mummzie

Gorse wine

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The dilemma.....gorse to build the bees up on.....or to make a brew. @jamesc.....don't you have a supply of gorse?

gorse wine.jpg

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Uh huh .... Gorse is the two edged sword ..... wonderfull bee feed, stabilises hillsides, nurse plant for natives, and I read somewhere that in England is has been mulched and used as a high quality race horse feed  .... but is one of Ecan's noxious weeds and subject to  the might of their control regulations.

We have a love hate relationship with the stuff .....

 

Perhaps we should make some of this" most agreeable of social wines" to lure @Ted from the warmth of The Bay and warm the cockles of his heart. 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, jamesc said:

Uh huh .... Gorse is the two edged sword ..... wonderfull bee feed, stabilises hillsides, nurse plant for natives, and I read somewhere that in England is has been mulched and used as a high quality race horse feed  .... but is one of Ecan's noxious weeds and subject to  the might of their control regulations.

We have a love hate relationship with the stuff .....

Several years ago when Environment Canterbury (ECan) called for submissions on their proposed Canterbury Regional Pest Management Plan 2017-2037 they received more submissions on gorse than any other pest.  The Canterbury Hub with extensive help from Trees for Bees NZ, lodged a submission.  Our members were interested in the proposed rules around gorse & broom.  Both are key pollen bearing plants for honey bees in Canterbury & are essential in spring colony expansion for hives going onto pollination contracts or into queen rearing operations, and we were concerned about the total removal of these key plants.  Our submission was successful, with ECan maintaining the status quo.  

 

So, if you want to make gorse wine, we still have the stuff in Canterbury and it's flowering now.  

 

 

Edited by Maggie James

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I could live with gorse, but  any submitters who sought  to  water down any proposed Broom control plan very obviously haven't been into St James  Conservation Area and seen what  broom really can look like . Bee food or not. 

 

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I can understand you sentiments, but only part of the St James Conservation area is in Nth Canty.  In  mid Canty we desperately need gorse & broom pollen for early spring buildup; particularly as dairy does away with more shelter belts and internal farm hedges.    We wouldn't be able to produce queen cells, or get hives built up for pollination contracts.

 

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