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jamesc

Regenerative Beekeeping.

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51 minutes ago, Bron said:

Yep, admit to being a lifestyle beekeeper! Could make more money teaching, but not nearly as much fun as I get from opening a beehive or looking at a jar of honey.

Despite the fact that the govt has doubled the registration fee for teachers at $440 pa.  Major drama and complaints on tonight's news.  I think compared to other industries they are getting off pretty lightly.  We have hive levies, compliance costs, petrol taxes, high ACC levies to mention a few extra costs, and we don't get 12 weeks paid annual leave.  I have to ask, have teachers been too insulated for far too long?

 

Oh, I forgot to mention.  Unlike the primary sector, teachers are guaranteed a regular income with kiwisaver employer contributions.  Do they still get long service leave, and ample paid sick leave?  

 

 

I am sure that over the last 20 years, they would tell us that their pay hasn't kept up with other industries.  

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@Maggie James, I’ve popped my soap box in the corner so other than to say, teachers don’t get 12 weeks holiday, they get 12 weeks of non contact time, by the time they’ve caught up on the piles of paperwork & the planning and evaluation there’s probably 6 weeks left. 
 

I loved being a teacher, but it was making me a person I didn’t like anymore.

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Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, Bron said:

teachers don’t get 12 weeks holiday, they get 12 weeks of non contact time, by the time they’ve caught up on the piles of paperwork & the planning and evaluation there’s probably 6 weeks left. 
 

 

Perhaps, now covid, the govt will have to consider how different industries work.  Beekeepers work, as you know incredibly long hours over the season, to pay their way for their down time which these days would not be 12 weeks of the year.  The 12 weeks non contact time, and guaranteed income is the choice of teachers and they need to come to terms with that reality.

 

I am sure that the reality of guaranteed income, and the experience that many have had over the past eight weeks imposed on them, with time with family, garden, home cooking, basic exercise will have an impact on many.  Along with the fact that many not in govt service are not going to earn the $ they once did.  Perhaps there are going to be many, as you note yourself and Stoney as below.  Maybe that's what a large majority have been missing the last few decades, and yes it all contributes to regenerative lifestyles. 

11 minutes ago, Stoney said:

Time to us Is the most valuable asset and yet it can be given away for free.. 

After earning the big bucks on the big jobs,  and feeling like the big boss with all the staff we have now dropped off the big grinding wheel.. preferring to pile the effort into spending what time we have on the things that reward the most.. family. 

I prefer my 19 yr old 500k hilux to a new black Dodge Rambo.. my trailer was loved by someone else before me.. and my bees don’t mind living on hand shifted single floors.. 

The winning payout for me sure ain’t having the flashest truck parked at conference.. just as long as the lifestyle can afford to supply a roof and some tucker she’s all good.. 

 

Edited by Maggie James

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1 minute ago, Maggie James said:

Beekeepers work, as you know incredibly long hours over the season, to pay their way for their down time 

I always thought beeks worked long hours over the season because they had to. I never realised there was an ulterior motive.

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17 minutes ago, yesbut said:

I always thought beeks worked long hours over the season because they had to. I never realised there was an ulterior motive.

Yes, beekeepers do work incredibly long hours over the season, but it is the alternative to other occupations and other choices in life.  I guess you can say that if you are going to work for a living there are benefits and downsides in every occupation.  Then there are the decisions to be made as to whether you are self employed, or an employee of the private or public sector and what industry standards or employment contract (don't know what the appropriate word here is, it used to be what trade union) you come under.  I do understand that it is not always a conscious decision a person makes as to what occupation they end up in, rather a string of events (but life is a complex journey of a string of events). 

 

But no matter what my work or living situation is, I have always chosen a certain amount of self sufficiency and regeneration, and that is a combination of a conscious decision and a string of events.  

 

Crikey, that's a heavy going explanation for me.  Time to call it a day. 

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I’ve been thinking about the mice on the wee wheel running fast going nowhere. 
 

I also wonder how many people who haven’t been stuck in traffic, have had hours that they haven’t spent going somewhere slowly, while juggling family life, dropping children at school & childcare are going to rethink the ‘price’ of these things. 
 

Maybe we will see a lot of regeneration of lifestyles after this.

 


 

 


 

 

 

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having lots of worms in healthy soil is great. Also I think there was discussion on Country Calendar not only making great soil and varied pasture, but also then not over stocking it with more animals than it can naturally support.

So, let's see, they are saying they avoid mono-crops, focus on plentiful and varied forage and don't over stock.

Seems like it would be sustainable and common sense for both farmers and beekeepers.

 

Not that easy to adopt or solve when the problem is over priced farms, high borrowings and a lot of pressure to over produce to make it pay short term on these farms. Similarly the big M distorts the beekeeping industry, people have to put food on the table too.

 

So, that means the long term plan is to make a good profit from multifloral and leave enough honey on the hives that they don't need feeding except in exceptional circumstances. Btw, welcome, you've all become hobbyists.

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We went to the Linnburn Station field day it was awesome to see about 20+ honey species in his paddocks and they all got the chance to flower so a fantastic environment for healthy bees. But yes, buckwheat, sunflower, vetch etc would produce a multifloral honey that is worthless. So we circle back to the question of how to sell a bit of sizzle with the sausage so that it is worthwhile having the bees there. BTW I understand he sold another farm to get the $1 mil to buy the massive seed drill/ roller combo. So it's the sort of farming philosophy that can be embraced if the business financially resilient in the first place. 

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1 hour ago, ChrisM said:

. Btw, welcome, you've all become hobbyists.

Lol .... 

grasshopper...

many path led here.. but most path begin  at the hobbyist gate 

 

deep down below the profit margin or the grey hair is the excited grin of the hobby keeper... floating in the timeless ebb and flow off the colony. 

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, jamesc said:

but about lifestyle , making do with less  but with more time to enjoy ...... which is why we got into the Bees ...... right

Lol, I bet you'd be in that big brute hauling when an opportunity allowed...

Staying in nice digs, an expense account, a long way from home. 

Oh, with a in house lawyer in tow. 

You really need to write a book. 

Edited by Gino de Graaf
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9 hours ago, jamesc said:

The other week Country Calendar profiled an Otago Cocky practising Regenerative farming .

And all that pollination from a single beehive

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9 hours ago, Maggie James said:

 

Despite the fact that the govt has doubled the registration fee for teachers at $440 pa.  Major drama and complaints on tonight's news.  I think compared to other industries they are getting off pretty lightly.  We have hive levies, compliance costs, petrol taxes, high ACC levies to mention a few extra costs, and we don't get 12 weeks paid annual leave.  I have to ask, have teachers been too insulated for far too long?

 

Oh, I forgot to mention.  Unlike the primary sector, teachers are guaranteed a regular income with kiwisaver employer contributions.  Do they still get long service leave, and ample paid sick leave?  

 

 

I am sure that over the last 20 years, they would tell us that their pay hasn't kept up with other industries.  

If you actually knew a teacher in person you wouldn't say the above.

The fact that every few years the govt has to provide incentives to recruit enough teachers is fact in its self that sane people choose other easier jobs.

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Just now, Shaun said:

If you actually knew a teacher in person you wouldn't say the above.

The fact that every few years the govt has to provide incentives to recruit enough teachers is fact in its self that sane people choose other easier jobs.

I have an immediate family member as a long term teacher, went back to teaching because it was a better lifestyle than working a decade for NZ's biggest lawyers.  Whilst the teaching pay equity is not as attractive as it was 20 years ago, unlike many jobs it is pretty much guaranteed income and job security.  Guaranteed income can come in particularly handy e.g. when the house  is munted by earthquakes and you couldn't get a rental property, motel to rent, in or around the ChCh area for love nor money unless you had guaranteed income.  

 

The industry bodies, or government departments, or various occupations often have recruiting drives.  We are probably about to get inundated with these drives as the government need to get people into employment and/or training.    

 

I doubt that these days, there are very few easy jobs available.  We live in a very competitive and expensive environment.  

 

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Many of the children starting school today are a far cry from those who used to start school. Totally un-house trained, very little verbal language range which is within bounds, and often have parents who have put very little effort into helping their children develop these basic skills. Financial background of the parents determines whether they have been sat in from of a TV all day, or using a handheld device all day. Many of these parents absolutely refuse to hear their children's reading at home. 

 

Have done several one day seminars on Biological farming - another incarnation of regenerative farming, and is usually phased in over five or so years, and once achieved the savings are considerable, mostly in fertiliser and veterinary costs. For one thing, the move away from the rye/clover diet to broader ranges of seeds planted. I hope that over the coming decade that Covid 19 will have sped up the rate of these types of practices as the land and water will benefit hugely, as well as the farming families.

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Definitely a more profitable and satisfying option long term. Also if there were more regen ag farmers in my area I would be happy, as they are more dependant on their beekeeper than they are on the fertiliser rep. There is an interesting film called "the Pollinators" that looks at all the bee death drama in the U.S. and it puts up regen ag as the possible solution. Even before this, we had been giving out alternative species to white clover for farmers to try, mainly for drought tolerance. So there could be a quiet revolution beginning on this front. 

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Posted (edited)

Well I don't know bout you lot, but I'm still trying to get what:   "income minus profit equals expenses" means.  Say I earn ten bucks, and I want a profit of nine bucks, that means I only have to pay $1 in expenses - but what if my expenses are $8-.  Sounds like a cracker of a business model to me, not having expenses 🙂

 

@john berry loved your post.

Edited by CraBee
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, CraBee said:

Well I don't know bout you lot, but I'm still trying to get what:   "income minus profit equals expenses" means. 

the factors in your control is the profit you take, and the expenses you incur

In your example, you are allowing $1 for expenses. Then you have to work very smart to achieve it.

 

It is suggesting a more realistic

Income $10

Profit $4

Expenses $6

Then your working smart target is to reduce your $8 expenses to $6 .

 

Edited by Mummzie

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Once you have a budget of $6 for expenses then you can decide how to get value from that spend limited to 6

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Posted (edited)

Ah ha I've got it.

I make airplanes.  I sell them for $10. (market for planes not great at the moment.....).

I want to make a $2 profit.

I should incur $8.50 in expenses, but instead I'm thrifty and spend $8 (I left the wings off).

🤔   😬    😱

 

 

Edited by CraBee
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06608D0B-C049-48C0-8007-A18889B049C4.jpeg

Aaah ..... you are getting there @CraBee  ..... I think.

 

Planning for next season  might go along the lines of ...... This year I sold X amount of honey for Y amount of dollars.

The budget is set in stone.

It costs me CC amount of dollars to run a hive, which with simple maths of Y divided by CC means I can run Q amount of hives.

 

Sorted.

 

The dilemma comes when   Y = 0 .

 

In the meantime, today was a day for Soul Regen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Today I trekked through the wilderness to the Promised Land.  OK, I didn't really trek, was in the truck

with the Bee Dog, who had to put up with my yarns, poor dog.   Manuka doing its thing with some still flowering, 

was very surprised to see a bee working it.  Its still relatively warm up here.  Yes that's a double Kauri.

Manuka Kanka Canopy.png

Manuka Double Kauri.png

Manuka Promised Land.png

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