Jump to content
Trevor Gillbanks

Apiary Diary May 2020

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Unfortunately not

The hakea gets overgrown when it moves outside the the really poor soil

Dunno about the unfortunate bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, kaihoka said:

I moved a hive into the hakea

i keep forgetting you're one of those migratory beekeepers people keep talking about

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, tommy dave said:

i keep forgetting you're one of those migratory beekeepers people keep talking about

The big commercial opp here puts its hives in the spot for summer manuka .

It has brought a big property down the rd for its manuka and I noticed some of their hives are still in the area.

I am going to suggest that they leave some of them in the hakea next yr .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

I am going to suggest that they leave some of them in the hakea next yr .

so you can deal with robbing over the winter also?

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Mummzie said:

so you can deal with robbing over the winter also?

No robbing when there is a decent flow on .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Started beekeeping at 17 now I'm turning 30, just finished spreading the last 2 7cube loads then dropped the digger off to the cuz for a borrow, sprayed 3 sites, fed 4L hivealive to my winter DBs and back to upgrading pallets.

What a journey of labour it has been, I have nearly completed building my business to what I always wanted, just need a really good 4x4 fork lift now but just took the truck in for a blast, treatment and paint with a 4.56 turbo engine due next hopefully so most probly be next season.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Maru Hoani said:

Started beekeeping at 17 now I'm turning 30, just finished spreading the last 2 7cube loads then dropped the digger off to the cuz for a borrow, sprayed 3 sites, fed 4L hivealive to my winter DBs and back to upgrading pallets.

What a journey of labour it has been, I have nearly completed building my business to what I always wanted, just need a really good 4x4 fork lift now but just took the truck in for a blast, treatment and paint with a 4.56 turbo engine due next hopefully so most probly be next season.

 

 

You recently got the Hiab.  Do you think a 4 * 4 forklift would be better?  I've always been a bit put off by having to tow something behind the truck...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

It's over 30 years since I've had any bees near some hakea but I used to look after a lot of hives which was surrounded by thousands of acres of  it and I don't remember a bee ever going anywhere near it. I wonder if the plants on Coromandel are the same variety as down south.

Edited by Mummzie
of/I've

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, john berry said:

It's over 30 years since I've had any bees near some hakea but I used to look after a lot of hives which was surrounded by thousands of acres of  it and I don't remember a bee ever going anywhere near it. I wonder if the plants on Coromandel are the same variety as down south.

They don’t go near ours either. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just took the grandkids for a walk and there was willow honeydew raining down like a fine drizzle.

  • Good Info 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 23/05/2020 at 8:16 AM, CraBee said:

 

You recently got the Hiab.  Do you think a 4 * 4 forklift would be better?  I've always been a bit put off by having to tow something behind the truck...

Better for my poor access sites where I gotta go off road, the side by side and a 4x4 fork lift, a ute loaded up and the truck loaded up 72+ hives per shift and the side by side can pull the fork lift if it gets stuck unloaded on the way in

Then the hiab loads the side by side and the fork lift unloads at the other end??? That's what I'm thinking

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Maru Hoani said:

Better for my poor access sites where I gotta go off road, the side by side and a 4x4 fork lift, a ute loaded up and the truck loaded up 72+ hives per shift and the side by side can pull the fork lift if it gets stuck unloaded on the way in

Then the hiab loads the side by side and the fork lift unloads at the other end??? That's what I'm thinking

 

Or maybe just have the 4wd forklift take pallets in if not too far?

I've thought about getting a small'ish tractor eg 30hp and then putting a forklift mast on it.  

The trouble is when I think think about the weight of it maybe 1 tonne ish, I'm put off, because I really need it to be able to get into 

more most remote and tricky access site and I'm not sure I could with this on the back.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 24/05/2020 at 3:37 PM, Maru Hoani said:

Better for my poor access sites where I gotta go off road, the side by side and a 4x4 fork lift, a ute loaded up and the truck loaded up 72+ hives per shift and the side by side can pull the fork lift if it gets stuck unloaded on the way in

Then the hiab loads the side by side and the fork lift unloads at the other end??? That's what I'm thinking

Hahaaa  @Maru Hoani ..... trust me ...you'll never be finished .... I guess that's why we got some men on the moon, eh.

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 24/05/2020 at 4:27 PM, CraBee said:

I really need it to be able to get into 

more most remote and tricky access site and I'm not sure I could with this on the back.

If you're reasonably confident about keeping those sites, it might be cheaper to fix up the access a bit ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyway, me and the Main Man were back on the tools  today.

 

Man love is a funny thing..... there is respect and decorum in Man Love , but the chatter out in the bee yard is one of things I treasure .... status is levelled as we talk and divulge how we and our families  got through lockdown , and is  possibly one of the drivers as to why we persevere when offered low prices for what our bees gather.

But tonight honey prices and money are boring stuff.

 

OMG ..... this time  last year I was pulling my hair out at the dead and dying bees.

What a difference twelve months makes.

 

This year we used Apivar as our autumn treatment of choice. Last year we used O/A.

We pulled strips from about 150 hives today. They were jammed with honey.... three boxes jammed, the queens were laying and the bees were in the top box . So we left one and took one, leaving the taker sat above the feeder to be taken when we felt the urge. It might well sit there til the spring.

 

It was a funny old day, because as we sat in the low light with a cup of tea at smoko savouring the inner glow of happy bees, and that somehow, this year, we seemed to have got it right .... the phone rang.

 

It was my old mate from up north. Old mate had given up his post on the  barricades with his Taiaha and was looking for honey, not some of our insipid whitey honey ..... but the real southern dark stuff .... honey dew.

 

Funny 'ole day

Good 'ole day.

'Aint nothing like a bit of Man Love to put things in perspective.

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, yesbut said:

If you're reasonably confident about keeping those sites, it might be cheaper to fix up the access a bit ?

 

Some of them are 3-4km off-road to get in.  I'll tell you a quick story.  About a month ago I had the truck loaded right up, and I went in.  A bk buddy of mine wanted to see the site and he followed me in his (unloaden) ute.  When we got in there we stopped and I asked him what he thought of the trip in.  He mumbled a bit and didn't reply.  I don't think he'll be back.   Jacinda could create quite a few hundred jobs working on that access 🙂

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@CraBee I keep threatening himself with a dash cam, however we love our farmers and have decided that I can do some tracks with my eyes closed, and the “ powers that be” don’t need pictorial evidence. 😫
 

 

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Bron said:

@CraBee I keep threatening himself with a dash cam, however we love our farmers and have decided that I can do some tracks with my eyes closed, and the “ powers that be” don’t need pictorial evidence. 😫
 

 

Does wet or dry make a big difference to your access tracks.

Here it makes all the difference

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My neighbouring commercial has just lost one of his yards of 20, and is about to remove the other. My three hives will have most of about 200 hectares of Kanuka to themselves. Which is a bother, I don't need more honey.

Edited by yesbut
  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, yesbut said:

My neighbouring commercial has just lost one of his yards of 20, and is about to remove the other. My three hives will have most of about 200 hectares of Kanuka to themselves. Which is a bother, I don't need more honey.

oh no, where will you get all your swarms from if this happens?

If you had only two hives, this would reduce your honey surplus and your workload, what could be better?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, ChrisM said:

oh no, where will you get all your swarms from if this happens?

If you had only two hives, this would reduce your honey surplus and your workload, what could be better?

Funnily enough a couple of months ago I couldn't even give away a hive.  I'll have another go in spring. And I can live without the swarm gathering. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, yesbut said:

Funnily enough a couple of months ago I couldn't even give away a hive.  I'll have another go in spring. And I can live without the swarm gathering. 

B ut you can't live without honey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, yesbut said:

My neighbouring commercial has just lost one of his yards of 20, and is about to remove the other. My three hives will have most of about 200 hectares of Kanuka to themselves. Which is a bother, I don't need more honey.

What do you mean by lost on of his yards?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of you will remember that the summer before last Canterbury had an AFB outbreak, where a vast proportion of the Beekeepers hives were burnt. We had several hundred hives in the vicinity and were a bit fearful of what we would find as we did our autumn Disease checks.

The problem was that after the autumn O/A treatment  a lot of the hives were dead ..... and disease checking was problematic.

We packed up the dead gear in the yards that were a total right off and stuck it in the shed for a rainy day when we would set to and melt it all out.  It's still sitting in the shed as the rainy days have been few and far between.

This spring we made up duds and deads  to repopulate . Many of the hives  made up this spring  never made a crop as we split so hard, but that was part of the plan as we really didn't 'need' more honey this year.

 To say that doing the final disease check of the year is interesting ..... both visual, and with the dogs .....would be an understatement.  

 

The worst part is sitting at home watching the txts come through that 'This morning the dogs are on fire '

  • Sad 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...