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Yes it's galvanised although I'm planning a bolt on, bolt off job, may not need to weld to the actual trailer. If a little is needed I could grind it.

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2 minutes ago, Jamo said:

Only half of what it is now.

Pasturizer, dryer and final filter. Vacume chamber was built by pros but rest was me and father in law and has had a few changes over the years.

 

Goodness that is way beyond anything I would even understand. Why do you pasturize honey?

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Only half of what it is now. Pasturizer, dryer and final filter. Vacume chamber was built by pros but rest was me and father in law and has had a few changes over the years.

Another Fitter/Machinist here. I have a 250amp single phase Mig (15amp plug but needs 20amp for full power) in the shed that I haven't used for years (I've had it since new nearly 30 years)

its not worth getting a mig for one job. $1000-1500 for the mig, 130 for gas, plus wire etc. a 200 amp stick welder your looking at $500 + rods.  

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4 minutes ago, Alastair said:

 

 

Goodness that is way beyond anything I would even understand. Why do you pasturize honey?

So the drums don't pop is the short answer. Needs to be a well controlled process to avoid damage to the honey but when done right will be less damaging than leaving boxes of honey in the warm room over the weekend. We are getting quite good at it now. Been doing it for nearly 20 yrs. Also most packers do it but they call it melting the crystals to avoid that nasty p word.

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A few years ago, I worked for a firm that built Rotary cowshed platforms, we used gasless mig wire on the galv pipework, it worked well for the job at hand, but I would not have used it on any structural welds, it was to brittle.

The company I work for now, uses Flux cored wire with CO2 for structural work, I prefer hard wire with Argoshield gas, which is a mix of Argon, Carbon Dioxide and Oxygen. I didn't know there was Oxygen in the mix until I just look it up on the BOC website.   

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10 hours ago, Alastair said:

Trevor I did not know you were trained in this, you are saying get a 180 amp, this is 165, you think that drop will be significant? I will take your advice. Other question, will a 180 A MIG welder get the same penetration as a 180 A stick welder?

There is a big difference inside the machine between 165 and 180 Amps.

A 180 mig and 180 stick will have the same penetration, however, don't get them confused with TIG.  This is a completely different process.

If you are planning on doing and welding with Galv steel then I would only but a stick welder.

However,  modern technology stick/mig welders are pretty good.  I would only buy a welder from a reputable welding equipment supplier.  BOC is a great start.

I am not allowed to weld now as I have a pacemaker and it can be affected by the high impulses of welding.

Do you have a 15 amp outlet in your shed, this will also make a big difference as to the size of welder you can purchase.

 

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Not sure about the 15 A outlet, how would I know? The main switchboard is in there and has a power outlet on it which is the only outlet in the shed and the one I run everything off.

 

Guess I'll have to find out about that, after that I'll defer the decision till after my visit with Tristan.

 

If I don't have a 15 A outlet, might just flag the whole idea. The other possibility would be just tack everything together with my little machine, and once finished take it to an engineer to weld all the joins properly.

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15amp wall sockets are $13.50 from Bunnings, direct replacement for a standard outlet AS LONG AS WIRING IS UP TO IT......a call to your sparky should sort that one way or the other.....changing wall fixtures you are allowed to do as owner.      AFAIK

 

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if the outlet is in the submain or main board then it easy to change it to 15amp socket. btw normal 10amp plugs fit 15amp sockets. so you can still use it for normal stuff.

 

just looking at my calc here, for 5mm steel you need around 160-170 amps, which mean that 160 amp mig is to small.

180 amp will be ok as long as run are not to long. 200 amp machine would be more suitable. (watch the duty cycle specs).

 

trimix gas is the standard gas from boc, coregas etc (bunnings).

if you want to keep cost down straight co2 is also a possibility but trimix is nicer and its a little bit easier on the machine.

dual shield wire i have not used. probably not worth the hassle as its not for thin stuff that you typically do with small machines.

 

machine wise i would not recommend synergic or semi synergic (which some of the boc machines are). something with basic volts, wire speed and inductance controls will work just fine.

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Thanks for that Tristan. 

 

This whole thing is turning out to be more involved and expensive than I had thought. I really only want the welder for one job and financially it's starting to look non viable, may be cheaper to just go to an engineer. 

 

But I'll hold off the decision until after my visit with you. Still got a few months till busy with the bees again so plenty of time.

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@Alastair This is my old stick welder,which I have built a patio,my trailer pictured,various dogboxes and lots of repairs to mates towbars,boxes ,trailers etc.It can take up to a 4mm rod which may need  130 - 150 amps,however the largest Iv used is 3.2 low hydrogens running around 110 - 120 amps no problem.The axle on my trailer is 50mm box with 5mm thickness,the towbar plate is 10mm flat and the steps are 6mm steel deck plate.

Its a 10amp plug ,with half decent handpiece but a new earth clamp i put on.I picked it up 2nd hand for $250 bucks and have had for about12 - 13 years.Im not a welder by trade but learnt all my welding plying my trade as a diesel mechanic.

Something similar ,I would be sure, would more than suffice for your needs,if you are still wanting to stick weld.

I prefer to mig weld but dont have one myself,Iv always had use of a workshop while i was in the trade.

My 5 cents anyway,and if you get desperate and dont wana splash out,you are more than welcome to borrow this one....I love a good excuse to head north!

IMG_20200420_130147.jpg

IMG_20200420_130241.jpg

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Thanks Phil, very kind of you. That was certainly a good score for $250.

 

I won't borrow it though, you have inspired me to keep an eye on Trade Me, let's see what sort of stick welder I might be able to pick up 🙂. Since it looks like no way to get a decent MIG with the extras I would want, in the needed price range.

 

My current welder is a cheapy 140 amp max, although as per Tristan I don't think it's a genuine 140 amps. It can run at best a 2.6 mm rod but that is pretty sketchy.

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Put a 3.2 rod in ur welder and try welding a couple pieces of 5 mm plate with that.Id  start around 110 amps...adjust your amps to suit,you might find your welder will be ok.A 2.5 rod anywhere between 60 - 100 amps.

If you are finding rods are sticking,not able to weld well...they may be damp,you can try putting them in oven at low temp or get a new packet.

 

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28 minutes ago, Phil46 said:

Its a 10amp plug

thats not exactly legal. it probably had a 15 amp plug originally. while its commonly done it does lead to burnt out power points.

the transformer style welders are less efficient and tend to draw far more current than compared to newer inverters. 

 

8 minutes ago, Phil46 said:

Put a 3.2 rod in ur welder and try welding a couple pieces of 5 mm plate with that.Id  start around 110 amps...adjust your amps to suit,you might find your welder will be ok.A 2.5 rod anywhere between 60 - 100 amps.

thats going depend a lot on joint confiq and type of rod used.

especially when you going to be dealing with gear thats highly stressed. ie most trailers are generally over welded and can survive a bit of poor welding.  a crane mount, not so much. i would not take short cuts on a crane mount.

 

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most home garages are on a 20amp circuit but the distribution board should say. The 15A plug looks like a 10amp plug except with a larger earth terminal.

If you run one of those plugs at 15A for any period of time they can get pretty hot, not really recommended for continous operation.

A lot of people believe it is safer to use a 16A caravan socket or so-called commando plug. Costs of these are peanuts so there is no reason cut corners.

However, it is a tiny bit illegal to install this diy especially if you want your insurance company to rebuild if it burnt the place down.

So it might be cheaper to factor in a sparky.

Rules have changed a lot for new builds and RCD protection, it is optional if you want to consider upgrade of board(s) to current standards.

I did recently have main board replaced and a 16A socket fitted and found a semi-retired sparky who let me scramble around under the house in the you know what.

 

https://nz.element14.com/c/connectors/electrical-connectors-power-outlet-strips/industrial-mains-plugs-sockets?current-rating=16a

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15 hours ago, Jamo said:

Also most packers do it but they call it melting the crystals to avoid that nasty p word.

i would not have thought they would all do it. its another expense and afaik you loose UMF when taking moisture out.

melting the crystals usually doesn't get it hot enough to pasteurise it.

but than again more and more beeks are taking honey off wet.

3 minutes ago, ChrisM said:

most home garages are on a 20amp circuit but the distribution board should say. The 15A plug looks like a 10amp plug except with a larger earth terminal.

If you run one of those plugs at 15A for any period of time they can get pretty hot, not really recommended for continous operation.

A lot of people believe it is safer to use a 16A caravan socket or so-called commando plug. Costs of these are peanuts so there is no reason cut corners.

However, it is a tiny bit illegal to install this diy especially if you want your insurance company to rebuild if it burnt the place down.

So it might be cheaper to factor in a sparky.

Rules have changed a lot for new builds and RCD protection, it is optional if you want to consider upgrade of board(s) to current standards.

I did recently have main board replaced and a 16A socket fitted and found a semi-retired sparky who let me scramble around under the house in the you know what.

 

https://nz.element14.com/c/connectors/electrical-connectors-power-outlet-strips/industrial-mains-plugs-sockets?current-rating=16a

i think sub boards have been 30 amp for some time now. but you never know with old houses.

 

15 amp plugs should not get hot with hobbyist use. the duty cycle on the welder is not very long. tho commercial welders can be a problem.

the other option is to use a 20 amp plug which is typically used on larger single phase welders. ie 250 or 275 amp welders.

 

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@tristan there was no object given in the original post as to what exactly was being made/repaired .Yes there are a few things to take into account when carrying out any sort of fabrication,however I was basing my opinions on my own experience of welding/fabrication .Maybe could have been a 15amp plug on my welder,doesnt look like it and Iv never changed it.

 

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Hey mate, if you're after a simple single phase no fuss mig welder I'd recommend something like a Weldwell steadymig 165 . Using argosheild gas and 0.9mm solid wire. Good solid machines if maintained, seem to pop up on trademe from time to time for a decent price.

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2 hours ago, Shaun said:

 

IMG_20191013_062114.jpg

 

ok just for @yesbut

 

this is a good example of the compromise you have to make with trailer design.

the big wheels gives excellent ground clearance for going through the rough stuff. by the looks of it the ute tires are interchangeable with the trailer which is handy for dealing with spares and gives a lot of traction. this is commonly done with offroad trailers.

however the downside is the utes tow ball will bottom out well before the trailer even gets close to bottoming out. the height becomes a problem with hand loading and possible issue with high roll centre.

smaller wheels gives a lower centre of gravity, makes it more stable, but reduces traction and ground clearance.

it all depends on whats important to you.

 

i like the 4 bar drawbar setup. very strong for the weight.

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