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7 hours ago, tommy dave said:

it's a prisoner's dilemma situation.

Plenty of beekeepers are adding strips in early feb and pulling them late march, while neighbouring beekeepers are adding strips in late march, and other neighbouring beekeepers are giving up and not adding strips. Those who pulled strips in late march are stuffed in this situation. Who is to blame? the beekeeper who pulls strips in late march and fails to keep monitoring? who knows. I've got sympathy for those competent enough to successfully add strips later.

Fortunately round here, everyone seems to treat at the same time with whatever treatment they are using, and that makes life a lot easier and more pleasurable.  It is soul destroying to have an apiary near someone who treats too little too late.  If a treatment is required between spring and autumn treatments, then an organic treatment is used.

 

When beekeepers treat too little, too late or not at all, and other beekeepers react with further treatments, this expedites the onset of chemical resistance to synthetic treatments.  

 

 

I always do a varroa count assessment early May.  That way I can assess if there is someone in the area that hasn't treated.  I don't often get  caught out, but in one instance I had to shift a nuc yard in December - soul destroying.  

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Had a similar experience.  Put it down to an Apitraz failure, not resistance to Amitraz.   We seemed to get good initial knockdown with the Apitraz, but later in the treatment period its' ef

Hi John, I have not posted much on here but do have a read now and then thought I would put my 5 cents worth in as this is something I have encountered this season.    We used Apitraz l

I was hesitant initially to actually name the product but apitraz is what seems to be causing the problem with my friends hives. I will see if he can find the batch number. It seemed to work fine on m

We haven't cracked a lid for almost a month now. But judging by the bees that were hitting the shed last week , they are alive and stinging.

We went to using Apivar in the autumn as it has a longer treatment time ..... 13 weeks I think ....  so in theory we are covered until the end of April.

Neighbours putting  autumn treatments in during April would be probably best to walk away and claim  a Gvt hardship benefit.

Edited by jamesc
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1 hour ago, Stoney said:

To maintain clean colonies I have found the best option for me is to have a treatment of some sort in over winter...

to give the Mite any breathing space between Feb and August leads to problems. 

That way I don’t really care what my neighbours regime is other than them getting weak and robbed. 

 

What is your hive setup through that period Stoney? IE, how many brood boxes, is there an excluder, how many staples and what size is your normal cluster size?

 

 

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10 hours ago, tommy dave said:

um, i abhor it when people suggest that OA/glycerine isn't a chemical treatment. What, exactly, do you suggest it is? a biological treatment?@! maybe oxalic acid isn't a chemical? god knows what you're getting at. You mean haven't used commercially supplied synthetic strips? if so, say so.

 

some people...


Stand down soldier. No need for anger when someone makes a mistake. I meant synthetic. 

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1 hour ago, Alastair said:

 

What is your hive setup through that period Stoney? IE, how many brood boxes, is there an excluder, how many staples and what size is your normal cluster size?

 

 

No real flows since end of Jan for me colony size is 1 - 2 boxes. I’ve pulled excluder so Q now has access to 2nd fd (Honey) they will all be in here come end of July when I swap the bottom empty to the top. 

Usually winter with staples numbers of which depends on brood amounts. 

Weve had snow here already this autumn with several frosts even back in early feb...  

honey dew usually sees populations wintering much larger. 

All have a 3/4 of honey ready to pop on if required as we bust out the other side of winter.

 

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OK apart from the snow and frosts sounds more like an Auckland size winter cluster.

 

Other question is, why do you want to come out spring with near zero mites. Is it because spring OA treatment is less effective if there is a higher mite population?

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I’d prefer to come into every season not just spring with near zero mites..  ox/gl in my experience is painfully slow in bringing back heavy infested colonies, trials done last season showed they do clean up but coupled with population loss can take too long. 

I’m of the mindset to keep mites very low and don’t give them treatment less time to build up to a point synthetics are needed. 

I’ve just worked one of the 3 sites today that I saw mites entering on bees on 16/3, ox had been in 4 weeks then.. the bad hives (8) of the 28 I gave bayvarol, the rest I left with ox, they all look really nice today, average 5-6 healthy brood with lots of eggs and grubs bees weren’t robbing at all and imagine they’re up in the gully in the beech. 

Edit.. treatment less during main flow, early Dec-late Jan. 

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Hey Stoney ....  Them mites give me goose bumps ... when I think of  where we were last year , the devastation and  the hit we took this year , not to mention the shear amount of Mahi mahi  Main Man and I put in to get the friggin bees back upto speed ..... for next year.

 

I'd be treating the whole lot synthetic. It's a lot of work, not to mention expensive, but....

The big picture always wins.

 

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I agree regarding the need to monitor Mite loads... although I’d say not many do and for various reasons.

 

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Thanks for sharing David.  Great to know I'm not the only one to get caught out.

I must also say that the supplier has shown concern and is being very helpful. 

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On 4/7/2020 at 1:38 PM, tristan said:

re invasion can catch even the most experience beeks out. trouble is it can snowball in highly populated areas.

whats important to note is timing. if the re invasion is out of step of treatment that gives time for the mites to increase in numbers in the hive and reek havoc on the bees before next treatment.

reminds me of the early days of varroa.

 

 

That's why I'm off to give the hives a blast with the provap now, I'll do a count up of mite levels on the trays and assess where I'm at for my spring treatment, also wintering hives away away from other beeks makes a big difference.

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On 6/16/2020 at 9:04 PM, john berry said:

I was hesitant initially to actually name the product but apitraz is what seems to be causing the problem with my friends hives. I will see if he can find the batch number. It seemed to work fine on my hives and those I checked with an alcohol wash had zero mites. The only reason I went away from Apivar is that ripping the strips apart aggravates a bit of arthritis I have in my hands (so much for bee stings preventing arthritis). It does look on the surface anyway as if there has been a problem with the product rather than resistance which is great for the on going use of the product but pretty tough on the affected beekeepers.

I wanted to use apitraz again but I ordered early march and come april I had been told of delays a few times from ecrotek so I had to cancel and revert back to apivar suspended by matches and it is annoying having to rip and push the spike in and then putting sticks in 1400 strips🙁

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I found the quickest way to put in apivar  was to grasp that little triangle shaped tag and give it a quick firm tug to the point of almost ripping it off. It then sits quite nicely and although doing this is a pain is not as bad as sticking matches or nails into it.Another way that worked quite well was to rip them all apart and then bend the top over and give it a good whack with a hammer on either side. They hang nicely this way. I have talked to the suppliers about the problems with this product and how some pretty simple changes would make it a lot more user-friendly

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On 6/21/2020 at 8:02 AM, Maru Hoani said:

I wanted to use apitraz again but I ordered early march and come april I had been told of delays a few times from ecrotek so I had to cancel and revert back to apivar suspended by matches and it is annoying having to rip and push the spike in and then putting sticks in 1400 strips🙁

I find with apivar is i fold the triangle back in half and put it between frames and as it springs back it holds itself there.

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I luv Apivar.   It's stiff and easy and quick to put in.   And  has worked exceptionally well for us this year.....   which is why I'm flat out like a lizard ......🍺 .... celebrating nine bucks 😘

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