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MrTipspeed

Wool Carder warfare

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Hello.

Brand new here but wanted to know if anyone has had success in trap nesting and disposing of Wool Carder bees.

They are busy dismembering the honey bees in our garden and I'd love to hear any tips for constructing effective trap nests for them so I can eliminate as many of them as possible. I'm sure the beekeeper who has hives nearby would fully back my campaign against these destructive little #######s.

Cheers.

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Hi, the male wool carder bees select a particular plant which they gaurd from all other pollinators except visiting females which they attempt to mate with.

 

So if you wanted to get rid of them no trapping would be needed, you would just have to fly spray the particular male wool carder bee.

 

However in the greater scheme of things wool carder bees have no profound effect on honeybee populations. I enjoy watching them, I have seen them pounce of visiting honeybees but the honeybee has been unhurt and just moves on.

 

Could you post a pic? I am wondering if what you are seeing is German or European wasps?

wool carder bee.JPG

 

Wool Carder Bee

.

 

german wasp.JPG

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German Wasp

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Hi. Thanks for the reply.

No, these definitely Wool Carders and the males have injured a number of honey bees as I've watched. We've had them around for 3 years now but the numbers have increased this season and the level of agression seems to have ramped up as well for whatever reason. Having read a little about them, it looks as if they're here to stay but I'll still seek a means of limiting their numbers as it appears to me that one aggressive male Wool Carder can disrupt the pollination process of a lot of honey bees. So far a fly swat has proven to be pretty effective but It's fairly labor intensive!

Thanks again for the reply. 

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Perhaps a 'home' of bamboo in short lengths stacked and in an open front box - let them hibernate in the house, and then 'gift' to somewhere far, far away.

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6 hours ago, MrTipspeed said:

So far a fly swat has proven to be pretty effective but It's fairly labor intensive!

I don't have a fly swat.  Instead a mini plastic tennis racket from the $2 shop.  You put a battery in it, and swot away, and the flies get killed by an electric shock on the plastic racket wires.  I have developed a v strong effective back hand. 

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2 hours ago, Maggie James said:

I don't have a fly swat.  Instead a mini plastic tennis racket from the $2 shop.  You put a battery in it, and swot away, and the flies get killed by an electric shock on the plastic racket wires.  I have developed a v strong effective back hand. 

Haha, yes I had one of those  but it John McEroe'd itself at the end of a savage forehand and broke at the end of the handle! Thanks anyway.

 

6 hours ago, Sailabee said:

Perhaps a 'home' of bamboo in short lengths stacked and in an open front box - let them hibernate in the house, and then 'gift' to somewhere far, far away.

Thanks, I'll look into when to do that. In 2010, Ansel Payne,  Dustin Schildroth and Philip Starks published some interesting findings and results for Tufts University regarding nest site selection for the Wool Carder and it seems that bamboo would probably attract these bees as a nesting site.

Cheers.  

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18 hours ago, Alastair said:

So if you wanted to get rid of them no trapping would be needed, you would just have to fly spray the particular male wool carder bee.

The prob with using fly spray to kill a specific pest in the garden, is that often unknowingly you are also killing beneficials.  When you kill a large amount of insects en mass at one site, they drop off the plant and you run the rest of smothering and killing the ground cover below with dead poisoned insects.   

 

Also of note, I know of one beekeeper who on honey analysis traces of fly spray exhibited, and they have absolutely no idea where that occurred.  Certainly not in the extraction plant.  

 

Interestingly MPI state that there is no evidence in NZ or overseas of carder bees impacting on honey bees.  http://www.terrain.net.nz/friends-of-te-henui-group/bees-and-wasps/bee-wool-carder-bee-anthidium-manicatum.html  Maybe you could provide evidence to the contrary and send to the appropriate person at MPI.  

 

"rest" above should read "risk".  

 

Maybe @Jacob could comment on unusual things found on honey analysis.  

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44 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

 Maybe you could provide evidence to the contrary and send to the appropriate person at MPI.

 

Me?

 

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10 minutes ago, Alastair said:

 

Me?

 

Maybe Mr Tipspeed

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Maybe. Not sure why he would want to bother with all that though, he was just here to ask a question.

 

 

.

1 hour ago, Maggie James said:

Also of note, I know of one beekeeper who on honey analysis traces of fly spray exhibited, and they have absolutely no idea where that occurred. 

 

How was it ID'ed as fly spray, ie, which chemicals.

 

Be aware that the active ingredients in fly sprays are commonly used insectides, mostly synthetic pyrethroids. 

 

Something else to ponder, a few years back when wax was being tested, lots of samples showed Tau Fluvenate, even though the beekeeper had never used apistan. It was a great mystery how this could have happened. Turned out to be contamination when the purchaser had re rendered it in a tank previously used for someone elses wax. 

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On 30/03/2020 at 6:34 AM, Maggie James said:

The prob with using fly spray to kill a specific pest in the garden, is that often unknowingly you are also killing beneficials.  When you kill a large amount of insects en mass at one site, they drop off the plant and you run the rest of smothering and killing the ground cover below with dead poisoned insects.   

 

Also of note, I know of one beekeeper who on honey analysis traces of fly spray exhibited, and they have absolutely no idea where that occurred.  Certainly not in the extraction plant.  

 

Interestingly MPI state that there is no evidence in NZ or overseas of carder bees impacting on honey bees.  http://www.terrain.net.nz/friends-of-te-henui-group/bees-and-wasps/bee-wool-carder-bee-anthidium-manicatum.html  Maybe you could provide evidence to the contrary and send to the appropriate person at MPI.  

 

"rest" above should read "risk".  

 

Maybe @Jacob could comment on unusual things found on honey analysis.  

 

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