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Not at all... we only just started! These are really classy drums. A big thank you to Jason in persevering to get us to buy them .... a quality product in some pretty sharp packaging.

We get one aggregate sample per bach. We have had some purchasers test each drum but that was their choice and cost.  

The pipe that runs from the honey sump in the extraction room to the bulk tank in the roof has a 20ml tap on it to facilitate sampling . As the honey is pumping into the tank we take samples into a tw

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16 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Not at all... we only just started!

These are really classy drums. A big thank you to Jason in persevering to get us to buy them .... a quality product in some pretty sharp packaging.

nice looking drums.

Something i've been wondering a while, and never got around to asking until now - when testing runs of honey against the manuka standard, is it a sample per drum? per extraction run? something else?

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19 minutes ago, tommy dave said:

nice looking drums.

Something i've been wondering a while, and never got around to asking until now - when testing runs of honey against the manuka standard, is it a sample per drum? per extraction run? something else?

We get one aggregate sample per bach. We have had some purchasers test each drum but that was their choice and cost.  

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The pipe that runs from the honey sump in the extraction room to the bulk tank in the roof has a 20ml tap on it to facilitate sampling . As the honey is pumping into the tank we take samples into a two litre container .  That is then stirred and becomes the batch sample from which a 500gm sample pot is taken.

For high value honey a batch sample is gathered, plus two smaller sample vials.

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13 hours ago, jamesc said:

3511B294-63C1-44B9-AD83-26E8DDAA81B9.jpeg

These are really classy drums. A big thank you to Jason in persevering to get us to buy them .... a quality product in some pretty sharp packaging.

i bet the paint job is worth as much as the honey

 

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14 hours ago, tommy dave said:

when testing runs of honey against the manuka standard, is it a sample per drum? per extraction run? something else?

we take a few samples per drum. so every drum can be tested if required.

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1 hour ago, Honey and Butter said:

Would an experienced beekeeper in the Taupo /South Waikato be interested in harvesting and wintering a bunch of hives - desperately seeking help.

 

recommend providing more details, or probably even better to start a new thread with an opening post providing a lot of detail

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9 hours ago, jamesc said:

Bro .... these drums are the conun- drum of NZ.

Made in India and about forty bucks cheaper than the ones made 100k's down the road in our backyard.

 

Only about $40 each then !?

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On 13/03/2020 at 7:04 PM, tommy dave said:

nice looking drums.

Something i've been wondering a while, and never got around to asking until now - when testing runs of honey against the manuka standard, is it a sample per drum? per extraction run? something else?

I do batch samples, the honeys homogenized first though

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In chemical manufacturing plants there are samples for testing, but also a reasonably large sample which is the 'retained sample' labeled with batch number and date which is generally kept for 5 years, so if there are ever any questions over time about a batch, staff can refer back to the retained samples. 

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To the question. Am I too late taking of my honey my answer would be yes you are.

Pre-varoa you would have been fine but now your hives are likely to be heavily infested and severely damaged and you may not have time to bring them back to health before winter.

Back in the day a lot of honey didn't come off till April or even May but anyone who doesn't have the honey off and the strips in by the end of February is seriously pushing the hives health. Sometimes you get away with it and often you don't.

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13 minutes ago, john berry said:

To the question. Am I too late taking of my honey my answer would be yes you are.

Pre-varoa you would have been fine but now your hives are likely to be heavily infested and severely damaged and you may not have time to bring them back to health before winter.

Back in the day a lot of honey didn't come off till April or even May but anyone who doesn't have the honey off and the strips in by the end of February is seriously pushing the hives health. Sometimes you get away with it and often you don't.

The arataki outfit on the Hauraki has its pasture on. Always late getting it off. I wonder about mites building, but mine tested low. No urgency to treat. 

 

Not too late, but the fact that @Honey and Butter is now looking to employ someone, means it will be by time someone organised it do the grunting. 

1 hour ago, jamesc said:

No .... Visy in Temuka charge us about $120 a drum !

That's expensive. 

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15 minutes ago, Gino de Graaf said:

The arataki outfit on the Hauraki has its pasture on. Always late getting it off. I wonder about mites building, but mine tested low. No urgency to treat. 

 

Not too late, but the fact that @Honey and Butter is now looking to employ someone, means it will be by time someone organised it do the grunting. 

That's expensive. 

Everything is expensive 100k's out of Auckland. But seriously, yes .... I don't understand why.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm in Dunedin, the weather is ####e, forecasting snow to 500 metres, and tomorrow I'm taking honey off my high country hives. It is all on escapes so it is easy going.

Depends on where you are and mite levels in your hives. Down here (inland) the mite levels are low but I still treat anyway, regardless. Better safe than sorry I always say.

Good to see the MPI working hard to incorporate beekeeping as an Essential Business so we can carry on with running our bees,  extraction and packing. We produce honey as part of the food industry. We can't just sit down and leave our hives to fend for themselves whilst a plague runs havoc in the country. I'm interested in what further measures will be incorporated into our daily lives so we will be able to sustain our businesses on a 'normal' level.

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At least at this time of the year, most honey is off, and treatments in, so what better time to sit down and plan for next season, work out what needs replacing or refurbishing, and then starting to work on the to do list in the shed.

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