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Apihappy

Varroa on the Queen.

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Just that, a blimmin great bug stuck on HRH's dot. I was going to do a Co2 test on the hive but when I saw this I just put strips in there and then. But is it too late?  Does anyone have experience with this problem and if so how did it turn out? 

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Other things about the hive will tell you if it's too late, such as if there is PMS in the brood.

 

However you have got strips in now, so as long as they are good ones and placed correctly, your bees will start feeling better. 🙂

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Thanks Alistair fortunately no obvious signs of disease. I was worried that the Queen would be compromised though and perhaps set off superceedure which may not be ideal with fresh strips in. :(

 

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Queens probably get bitten more than we like to think about. There is no doubt in my mind that queens die younger and age faster now, than pre varroa.

 

As to supersedure with strips in, mine supersede fine with strips in, doesn't appear to be an issue.

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It's a good time of the year for supersedure. Could do you a favour. 

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Posted (edited)

We had a look at the hive this morning with some trepidation but all was well. The queen was free of mites. There was some discussion as to weather carnolians are so chilled out that they forgot to groom the queen. Whatever, there was a distinct improvement in brood pattern and activity in the hive. Quite a few wasps about so stopped the entrance down. Happy with that.

Edited by Apihappy
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Thing with varroa is that they take on the exact smell of the particular hive they are in.

 

Inside a hive is dark and the bees work on feel, and chemical signals. So the back of a mite feels just like a bee, and they smell like a bee. Effectively they are invisible, and walk around on and among the bees as they please.

 

The only time they inflict any pain on an adult bee is when they feed which is from under the abdominal plates, where the bee cannot get them out from anyway. You will see these bees trying to clean and expressing discomfort though. Basically, varroa mites have survival in a beehive down to a fine art.

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I would have thought you would be very Apihappy with that 

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