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Pasture/clover honey prices


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39 minutes ago, Alastair said:

LOL just messing with you Gino. 😄

 

Kinda feel the same, it's a bit in your face. However if someone chooses to use it, that is probably their intent.

Me too, with the messing about bit.

 

I will talk with @Grant or better still I will start a thread asking peoples opinions.  Stupid democracy after all.  I prefer Dictatorships.

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MPI's manuka standards are complete and utter rubbish. I had some very good manuka last year with a high UMF and it was graded as non-manuka yet mix enough clover with it and it becomes multi floral m

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Lol Trevor .... I don’t like it either .

 

Alastair it wasn’t that long ago March 2017 .

cost us $80 but his price was variable and we paid more than some because we were getting good money for our honey so nice to spread it around a little.

 

Name was Mike Wraight.

been beekeeping for a very long time. 
 

Top bloke,  very much respected by all who knew him.

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2 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

yes it’s irrelevant now but you are questioning me on Kanuka Manuka pollens and Kanuka adulterating Manuka etc etc ignoring the fact that before MPI told us what Manuka is Kanuka was and will always be part of Manuka honey.

Why was that though - because they couldn’t tell the difference based on pollen??😉

2 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

Your honey may have been sold based on UMF but having UMF doesn’t mean your honey is solely or mainly Manuka. 
So on one side you say before the MPI standard we shouldn’t have sold honey on pollen count Because Kanuka was being sold as Manuka but then you tell me you sold your honey on UMF content no matter the floral sources

I actually like pollen counts to be used to identify honey types as long as it’s accurate and I think of M & K as two different types.  I was paid for my honey based on umf content but I take your point.

2 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

If UMF is what the consumer wanted and was buying Manuka for then what of the high UMF honey produced in Northland that is now not passing the standard ?

Yes umf is what they wanted.  MPI obviously aren’t concerned about that and appear to be solely concerned with making sure it is just Manuka that is sold as such - codex presumably comes into the equation.

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17 hours ago, Stoney said:

What is an average 2MAP for northland Manuka? 

What would you call high 2MAP? 

A very good question.   Whilst the mono "number" is 5 or greater, what  "good 2MAP" means is wide open for speculation?   I would love to hear from anyone who thinks they know what "good 2MAP" actually is .... or certainly what the buyers are using as their leverage points.   It just seems like another way to exclude product that is actually very good  and drive down the value, but maybe I am being too cynical. 
 

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53 minutes ago, Ted said:

Yes umf is what they wanted.  MPI obviously aren’t concerned about that and appear to be solely concerned with making sure it is just Manuka that is sold as such - codex presumably comes into the equation.

I think the reason was that mpi did not want to take a business commercial rating as a starting point, they were looking at, is it-isn't it manuka honey , not what activity or any other commercially vested markers that an industry my want to use in their marketing. 

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36 minutes ago, Dennis Crowley said:

I think the reason was that mpi did not want to take a business commercial rating as a starting point, they were looking at, is it-isn't it manuka honey , not what activity or any other commercially vested markers that an industry my want to use in their marketing. 

With the benefit of hindsight it’s a pity we didn’t market it as UMF Honey or Medical Honey - taking any floral reference out of the name and valuing it entirely on its umf rating.  Problem solved!!

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33 minutes ago, Ted said:

With the benefit of hindsight it’s a pity we didn’t market it as UMF Honey or Medical Honey - taking any floral reference out of the name and valuing it entirely on its umf rating.  Problem solved!!


absolutely 100% agree 

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8 hours ago, Alastair said:

To me this highlights an issue with the pollen analysis method. Every so often we'll put a comb through the extraction line that is clogged up with pollen. Or maybe a bunch of combs with a few cells each. This has potential to dump pollen into the honey that may, or may not, represent the main floral type of the honey, and could skew the results.

wonder if you inadvertently just created a market for frames full of manuka pollen to add into extraction runs?

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55 minutes ago, tommy dave said:

wonder if you inadvertently just created a market for frames full of manuka pollen to add into extraction runs?

Well if you are going to do that, why not just wave a bunch of manuka flowers over the honey in the settling tank or drum.  Just joking, before anyone crucifies me again.

 

In the past I have used two local contract extractors, neither of whom will put frames through containing brood.  

 

With regards to comb clogged up with pollen.  My thoughts are that these have been moved up from the brood nest.  This is a practise that in our area has been frowned on for quite sometime, by our honey buyers.  Because, yes it can alter lab analysis.  Well any way, once again, I will await comments disputing that statement.  

 

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7 hours ago, Chrisdub said:

A very good question.   Whilst the mono "number" is 5 or greater, what  "good 2MAP" means is wide open for speculation?   I would love to hear from anyone who thinks they know what "good 2MAP" actually is .... or certainly what the buyers are using as their leverage points.   It just seems like another way to exclude product that is actually very good  and drive down the value, but maybe I am being too cynical. 
 

We had a honey this year with a 2map of 15. 

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Just now, nikki watts said:

We had a honey this year with a 2map of 15. 

Nikki Would 15 2 MAP be pretty normal for your honey? 

Ive heard Sth Island 2MAP is usually higher but DHA lower than nth Island.. meaning value is higher as is used to up the nth Island figures through blending.. 

my 2MAP this season was between 32 and 36 over my 4 batches. DHA average 1460

I find it very interesting how different the Manuka tests both between seasons and also areas. 

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What - Bush! steady on old chap 😀

 

Nothing as good as yours I'm afraid Stoney, but for me, a nice surprise as I wasn't expecting anything.

 

All my honey was extracted in 2 runs. The first i knew had manuka so was hopeful, it had a DHA of 760. The second run included some sites nowhere near any manuka so I wasn't expecting anything but splashed out on a test anyway, it had a DHA of 695. Which because of the dilution factor, means there must be some sites in there that are pretty good.

 

So next season I'm going to work a bit harder at identifying the good sites and keeping them seperate.

 

And yes, I know some of you hard core manuka producers will scoff at those numbers but to me, I'm very pleased, there's plenty i can do with that.

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Year on year these sites produce different numbers which is what interests me the most.. a couple of my sites are in sight of each other but about 4 k as the bee flies and 200 m alt, the high site is consistently higher in HMF but higher DHA . 

Interesting. This season for me growth projections are higher than usual. 

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That helicopter pilot guy who made headlines for selling the highest ever UMF honey officially measured, in jars for something around $3,000 a jar, claimed in a news article that he has selected sites where the manuka is stressed by high winds, etc.. Wonder if there is any truth to that?

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5 minutes ago, Alastair said:

That helicopter pilot guy who made headlines for selling the highest ever UMF honey officially measured, in jars for something around $3,000 a jar, claimed in a news article that he has selected sites where the manuka is stressed by high winds, etc.. Wonder if there is any truth to that?

Interesting .. I met him at conference couple yrs back.. this season for the first 2 wks my poor hives endured sustained nw winds exceeding 120 km and I was surprised at box weights during this time.. I was having trouble standing upright... 

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10 minutes ago, Alastair said:

That helicopter pilot guy who made headlines for selling the highest ever UMF honey officially measured, in jars for something around $3,000 a jar, claimed in a news article that he has selected sites where the manuka is stressed by high winds, etc.. Wonder if there is any truth to that?

The helicopter honey guys never came back here  this seasin

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6 hours ago, Stoney said:

Interesting .. I met him at conference couple yrs back.. this season for the first 2 wks my poor hives endured sustained nw winds exceeding 120 km and I was surprised at box weights during this time.. I was having trouble standing upright... 

YEs, that is v interesting.  Wonder if the wind stunts the growth, and the when things settle down the plant has some sort of major rush to survive, and perhaps also has accumulated stores.  

 

 

Did the winds stand out as either hot or cold?  The myrtle family of trees certainly survive extreme conditions.  

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7 hours ago, kaihoka said:

The helicopter honey guys never came back here  this seasin

Interesting .....we looked at one of the contracts a year or so ago and wondered how we were going to make money. 

Even with no helicopter I'm still wondering how we are gonna make some money.

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1 hour ago, Maggie James said:

 

Did the winds stand out as either hot or cold?  The myrtle family of trees certainly survive extreme conditions.  

Was some great heat overall this year, in 30s,  hot calm muggy Ozzy smoke hazed days, but very windy at the start of flowering. 

Last season was a shocker.... 

I’ll be hedging my bets next season won’t be as kind and will plan for that. 

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8 hours ago, Alastair said:

Just trucks?

 

Wonder if the helicopter thing is no longer viable there, how does your own honey tend to test Kaihoka?

 

My friends down the rd who get manuka get about 5/7% activity what ever that means .

And 90% manuka pollen count .

That was lasy yr . I will find out about this yr .

The manuka flowered really well , but so did everything else .

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