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NZBF Hacking some1 Bee”

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Hey guys, recently I extracted couple boxes of honey and with many thxs from members here helping me with some tips! 

anyway the empty frames were leave inside the garages and Some1 leave the back door open! (Wife) Lol...

I came back from work and the wife was scream for help lol..I opened the garage door and heaps! I mean heaps of bees roaring at the honey boxes! 
 Slipped on the protected gear and move the boxes out the back yard! 


Now the next morning there were more bees coming for the honey! 
so I decided to Try to steal these bee! 
I place on the plastics base with close entry and used the top board with the 4 corners exit entry and turn it upside down so the bee can entry the hive Can’t exit back out! 
 

I mean it was a massive bee gathering,

I have trapped bee swarm before but this time iam not too sure if it’s a swamp cause I don’t think there any queen with it! But it was a big gathering..


 

I know it abit too late this time of the season for getting fresh brood..would introducing a new queen worth trying? 
or should I merge these bee with my old lot? 
 

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 its robbing season @Snap and you were providing easy pickings. 

Its easier to get the bees to do the cleanup work after extraction. Place a board on the hive with one or two small holes (10mm drill) Ideally put an empty box on that, then the box with the extracted frames and make sure the top board is totally sealed- no external entry. That way the bees take the honey from the wets and stores it in the hive- leaving you with clean dry frames to store securely for winter away from wax moth.(and bees)

 

That wont be a swarm- just a lot of robbers. When you let them out they will return to their hive...but will be back to check if you have cleaned up yet. Your best course of action is to remove anything honey or wax and keep doors closed for a few days.

 

 

Edited by Mummzie

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I wouldn't have thought that was good practice as it encourages the robbing and could contribute to  spreading AFB.

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What Mummzie and Grant said.

 

However if you do want to use the bees you can move them to a site out of flying range, preferably give them some brood, then a few days later you can give them a queen. At an extracting shed I know that gets a lot of robbers, they vacuum them up at the windows and start mating nucs with them.

 

But really, allowing robbing is bad. Nobody knows how bad it can be till they did it and learned. You have now learned. Doing that to somebody elses bees is poor practise, the bees are just doing what comes naturally, but as per Grant, you are passing whatever diseases your bees may have, to them.

 

If nobody allowed robbing, there would be no spread of AFB. Robbing IS bad, our beekeeping practises should be designed around making sure it does not happen.

Edited by Alastair
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8 hours ago, Grant said:

I wouldn't have thought that was good practice as it encourages the robbing and could contribute to  spreading AFB.

Also contributes to grumpy bees, grumpy beekeeper, grumpy farmer, grumpy public.  Also contributes to decline in hive strength & deaths.  Sometimes to queen deaths when inspecting hives.  Robber bees will hone in on her

Edited by Maggie James

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16 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

Robber bees will hone in on her

I lost a queen in a robbing frenzy situation .

I thought she was just collateral damage .

Why would robbers waste time and energy focusing on a queen ?

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6 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

I lost a queen in a robbing frenzy situation .

I thought she was just collateral damage .

Why would robbers waste time and energy focusing on a queen ?

 

She is just in the way.

Robber bees fight anything that is in their way.

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Agreed, as per Trevor. Robbers do not particularly seek out the queen, but if there is massive fighting especially of a small hive where all bees in it could be involved, the queen can be attacked along with the others.

 

However working a hive in such circumstances is craziness. If it's that bad, the beekeeper is better to pack up and leave. Hives can be lost, both while you are there, and afterwards. The beekeeper should also be taking a look at their own methods to see what they did that allowed things to get that bad in the first place, and change what they are doing.

 

What I do in situations where robbing is a risk, is take the hive lid off and put it down, then stack the honey boxes on it, squarely, so bees cannot get in from underneath. Then put a mat or similar on top, so it's rob proof. Then do whatever it is that is needed in the brood box, not leaving any comb laying out exposed, where robbers can access it. Work fast, don't do anything does not have to be done, and above all leave no honey anywhere that robbers can get to. If robbers never get any encouragement in the form of a taste of honey, you may have bees showing robbing interest, but it will not go too far beyond that.

 

There can be other circumstances though, where nothing you can do will work. I can remember being asked by a friend to look at his 2 hives. Before we even opened them there were angry bees and i took a sting in the face. Opened the first hive and almost instantly it was pounced on by big numbers of robbers. The beekeeper told me a big commercial apiary had just been dumped over the road, less than 100 meters away. The robbing got real bad real fast, with bees fighting. I closed the hive, we put entrance gaurds on, and walked away. To continue would have likely killed those hives. I took a look at the new apiary, it was in uproar. There were some weak hives in it being robbed by the others, and the air was full of enraged bees. With this going on, the hobby hives next door would have to be left until things settled down.

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12 hours ago, Alastair said:

If nobody allowed robbing, there would be no spread of AFB. Robbing IS bad, our beekeeping practises should be designed around making sure it does not happen.

 

You reckon Alistair? Its suggested that beekeepers do most of the spreading of AFB via frames of brood ! But yes, robbing (or "open feeding" as they call it in the USA) is bad. Not to mention a lot of dead bees !

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Put your boxes back in the shed, leave your shed closed up as any bees trapped inside will die over the next couple of days and hunter bees will soon see there is no gain to be had. 

If bees can escape from your garage they will pass on the spot they escaped from so block anything up. 

Lesson learnt, always mat boxes even if in your garage and avoid leaving doors open for hunters to find and communicate the find. 

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6 hours ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

 

She is just in the way.

Robber bees fight anything that is in their way.

I do believe that robbers will seek out the queen.  The queen emits pheromones, so they know exactly which one she is.

 

In a cropping situation, after the crops have been harvested, robbing when inspecting a bee hive can be a major issue.  When inspecting frames, I have witnessed in these extreme conditions, robbers just zooming on the queen within nano seconds killing her!  To avoid major robbing, in these conditions, only a few hives in the apiary can be inspected.  Best to feed hives later in the day or on dusk.  That way the bees take down syrup over night, and the atmospheric dew dissipates any syrup spills in the apiary.  

Edited by Maggie James
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2 hours ago, JohnF said:

 

You reckon Alistair? Its suggested that beekeepers do most of the spreading of AFB via frames of brood ! But yes, robbing (or "open feeding" as they call it in the USA) is bad. Not to mention a lot of dead bees !

 

Oh yes quite right John. What I meant, was if no robbing, AFB would not be spread to neighbouring beekeepers. But of course, within a beekeepers own hives, the primary means of transmition will often be by the beekeeper transfering infected equipment, as you say.

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